Tag Archives: tube

Design of a Korg Nutube Amplifier

Karlwoodward @ www.rs-online.com/designspark is in the process of designing a “guitar pedal” for amplification and distortion using the Korg Nutube we featured earlier. The Part 1 of a series of articles goes through the basic aspects of tubes and valves, the pros and cons on using a Nutube valve as well as discussing about low gain and high source impedance. In Part 2 of the series he goes deeper by building a working prototype and making some measurements.

Nutube – low power vaccum tube

A new vacuum tube which puts vacuum fluorescent display technology to practical use is in distribution from RS Components.

Nutube, similar to a conventional vacuum tube, has an anode grid filament structure, and operates exactly as a triode vacuum tube. Also similar to a vacuum tube, it creates the same characteristic rich overtones. By applying their vacuum fluorescent display technology, Noritake Itron Corp., a Noritake Co. Ltd affiliated company, have devised a structure which achieves substantial power saving, miniaturization, and quality improvements when compared with a conventional vacuum tube.

Nutube – low power vaccum tube – [Link]

Slimline SMD Bamboo IN-14 Nixie Clock

@ instructables.com writes:

There are a lot of nixie clocks out there and a lot of them are based on the IN-14 tubes. I wanted to design my own for the sake of designing my own, but also had some specific requirements: Make it as small and thin as possible. A lot of the clocks out there have very bulky bases. CNC a nice case out of bamboo. Because I like bamboo and wanted to get some use out of my little desktop CNC machine. No RGB leds under the tubes. I hate those. Single spin of the PCB, no prototypes. I wanted this to be a relatively quick project. This meant using a microcontroller and RTC I have used before, heavily borrowing from proven designs and using a pre-made power supply to limit the risk of having to iterate the board.

Slimline SMD Bamboo IN-14 Nixie Clock – [Link]

RELATED POSTS

Nixie Bargraph Kit

Robin @ kickstarter.com launched his new campaign on a project using IN-9 Nixie tubes. Now you can easily control two IN-9 Nixie bargraph tubes with 2 PWM inputs from your Arduino, Raspberry or other control board. The tubes are controlled by PWM signals and adjusting the PWM duty cycle you can control the tubes height, thay easy!

I had the idea for this project after building myself a Nixie bargraph clock which looked fantastic and eye catching. Instead of using conventional nixie tubes, which use numbers to display the time, the time is indicated by the height of the neon glow. But, this isn’t just limited to displaying the time, anything can be indicated with these tubes, temperature, humidity, atmospheric pressure, proximity… anything!

Geiger counter with SBM20 tube

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by weirdlab.fr:

I “rebuild” my Geiger counter, the SBM-20 tube was initially inside the box, i have put this one inside a 32mm diam plastic tube, for more convenience, wired through a XLR3 cable. This counter is from “Electronique-Pratique” n°368, a french electronic magazine. Shem, pcb, and PIC hex & C source code available.

Geiger counter with SBM20 tube – [Link]

Wireless Nixie Thermometer

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by christian.ich.7 @ instructables.com:

The Target of this Project was to learn how to use different functions of the atmega:

• Connecting two Atmegas with a wireless connection
• Each Atmega has a Thermometer (DS1621) to read the actual temperature
• Use the sleep Mode of an Atmega
• Controlling a Nixie bargraph In-13

Wireless Nixie Thermometer – [Link]

RELATED POSTS

Nixie Tube Clock

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by Pete Mills :

If you’ve poked around the internets where electronics hobbyists collect, it is likely that you are acutely aware of our incontrovertible affinity for building timekeeping clocks. It is similarly unlikely that you have been able to evade the plenitude of nixie tube based projects. There is a reason for this.

Nixie tubes are cool. They have great aesthetic appeal with their difficult-to-photograph, warm orange glow, and dem curvy numerals. They add an organic je ne sais quoi to a hobby with ostensibly digital design cues. Further, they pose technical challenges in the way of producing and switching the ~175 V DC needed to light each tube element. And as far as I am aware, there are no new nixie tubes being produced; as such, procurement can be a challenge unto itself. My N.O.S. nixies came from Russia thru Ebay, and only 3 were duds. Incidentally the seller replaced those 3, FOC.

Nixie Tube Clock – [Link]