Tag Archives: ultrasonic

Ultrasonic Atomizer

This reference design is a simple ultrasonic atomizer that helps fight against respiratory diseases. Atomizer is like nebulizer, it is just that nebulizer takes time to deliver liquid to mist. However, both undergo almost the same process. This medical ultrasonic atomizer circuit is composed of power supply circuit, ultrasonic oscillator and atomizer circuit. It specifically uses the TE connectivity’s fuse for overcurrent protection.

The device works when electrical energy is transmitted to piezoelectric transducer within the converter, where it is changed to mechanical vibrations. This ultrasonic vibrations are intensified and focused at the tip where the atomization takes place. The liquid travels through the probe and spreads out and the oscillating tip disintegrates the liquid into micro droplets that forms a low velocity spray.

This simple atomizer is widely used for medical applications. It uses high frequency vibrations to aerosolized the medication into a fine mist. It is commonly used for the treatment of cystic fibrosis, asthma and other respiratory diseases.

Ultrasonic Atomizer – [Link]

HC-SR04 Ping Sensor Hardware Mod


by cascologix.com:

HC-SR04 ultrasonic sensor modules, also commonly called ping sensors, are practically a dime a dozen, with many Asia online retailers selling them in the $2 to $3 dollar range each. While possibly not intended for an end solution or product, these sensors offer a more affordable option for prototyping and application development compared to the original and possibly more well-known ping sensor sold by Parallax, or transducers sold by Maxbotix.

HC-SR04 Ping Sensor Hardware Mod – [Link]

DIY Digital Tape Measure


by electronics for everyone @ instructables.com:

Today I hope to teach you all about ultrasonic sensors and hopefully by the end you’ll have a nice little digital tape measure of your own to use as you please. This is my second version of this project so if you can get it as small or just don’t feel like dealing with the Arduino Pro mini feel free to change it in any way you want.

DIY Digital Tape Measure – [Link]

Analog Ultrasound Range Finder


by netzener @ instructables.com:

When I started my career in control systems I was fascinated with the many different ways that machines could be interfaced to the environment they operated in. Limit switches (electrical and optical), encoders, resolvers, strain gauges, thermocouples… the control system engineer had a long list of sensors to choose from. And the list has grown even longer following successful innovations in micro machining.

Analog Ultrasound Range Finder – [Link]

Arduino LCD Project for Measuring Distance with Ultrasonic Sensor


by toptechboy.com:

In LESSON 18 you learned how to use an ultrasonic sensor to measure distance, and in LESSON 19 you learned how to connect an LCD to the arduino. In this lesson we will combine what you have learned to create a circuit for measuring distance, and displaying results on an LCD display.

You can use the schematic below to connect the circuit. If you did LESSON 19, you should already have the LCD hooked up. For more info on connecting to the LCD, and how it works, review LESSON 19. This schematic is for the LCD in the Sparkfun Inventor Kit, or similar LCD. If you have a different LCD, you will have to determine the proper connections. There are some helps in LESSON 19. If you need the ultrasonic sensor, you can pick one up HERE.

Arduino LCD Project for Measuring Distance with Ultrasonic Sensor – [Link]

Dog Repellent Ultrasonic Circuit 2



When we hear the word “Ultrasonic” we often refer it to bats and dolphins communication. Technically, “Ultrasonic” applies to sound that is anything above the frequencies of audible sound, and includes anything over 20kHz. Frequencies used for medical diagnostic ultrasound scans extend to 10 MHz and beyond. This dog repellent ultrasonic circuit will chase away angry dogs. It comprises of a 555 timer IC, a speaker/piezoelectric and a little ferrite transformer.

The main part of this circuit is a 555 timer IC. A 555 timer IC is an integrated circuit (chip) used in a variety of timer, pulse generation, and oscillator applications. The 555 can be used to provide time delays, as an oscillator, and as a flip-flop element. Derivatives provide up to four timing circuits in one package. You can use the 555 effectively without understanding the function of each pin in detail. Frequently, the 555 is used in astable mode to generate a continuous series of pulses, but you can also use the 555 to make a one-shot or monostable circuit. The 555 can source or sink 200 mA of output current, and is capable of driving wide range of output devices.

To use this circuit adjust 4k7Ω Resistor at resonance frequency of the piezo transducer for maximum amplitude of the repeller ultrasonic sound. At 11 KHz to 22kHz this can reach a value of 10Vpp and the buzzer is a passive one (without generator).

Note: Ultrasonic frequency must be set with a dog nearby.


4k7Ω Resistor
10uF Capacitor
10nF Capacitor
1k2Ω Resistor
4k7Ω Potentiometer
NC Push Button

Dog Repellent Ultrasonic Circuit 2 – [Link]

Arduino Ultrasonic Anemometer


by lfaessler @ soldernerd.com:

My aim is to build an ultrasonic anemometer based on a Arduino Uno board. Now what’s an anemometer? That’s just a fancy name for a wind meter. I want to be able to measure both wind speed and wind direction with high accuracy. Most wind meters are of the cup or vane variety. They turn wind into mechanical motion and then measure that motion to calculate wind speed and possibly direction. An ultrasonic anemometer on the other hand sends and receives ultrasonic pulses and measures the time-of-flight. From the time-of-flight (or the time difference, depending on your approach) you can then calculate the wind speed in a given direction. Add a second pair of senders and receivers at a 90-degree angle and you get both wind speed and direction.

Arduino Ultrasonic Anemometer – [Link]

Tactile Holograms


by elektor.com:

When MC Hammer rapped ‘You can’t touch this’ little did he know of the work being carried out by a group of scientists at Bristol University. The team led by Dr Ben Long and colleagues Professor Sriram Subramanian, Sue Ann Seah and Tom Carter have produced an ultrasonic sound system able to generate 3D shapes in mid-air that can be felt.

Tactile Holograms – [Link]