Tag Archives: USB

BML GPIO-14 USB Board for PCs

BML project for using a $2 FTDI FT260Q for adding 14 bits of GPIO to any PC via USB with no device drivers required.

Ever miss the simple days of using a PC’s LPT1 parallel port to bit-bang GPIO over 8 output pins and 4 input pins of the DB-25 connector? I sure do. My first design project as a BSEE graduate in 1993 was to design a LPT1 controlled test fixture for the Motorola MDT-9100-T data terminal (shown below). Those were the days. By multiplexing 12 parallel port pins into 74HC dip CMOS latches and transceivers my test jig tested all the IO signals of the MDT-9100s 386sx motherboard. All of the diagnostic software could be written in C on my Windows 3.1 desktop thanx to this versatile interface. Those were the glorious simple days of computing. Sigh…. Then USB came along and killed the wonderfully easy parallel port interface.

BML GPIO-14 USB Board for PCs – [Link]

Micro Soldering Station for 10$

Transform a cheap USB soldering iron in a powerfull Active tip Soldering Station.

With almost no thermal capacity this station regulates the tip’s temperature instantaneously. Solder larger thermal mass with ease, it’s magic.

Micro Soldering Station for 10$ – [Link]

Renesas Develops RJ45 Ethernet Socket With Entire Ethernet Controller Embedded Into It

Renesas Electronics Corporation, a significant supplier of advanced semiconductor solutions, announced its latest industrial Ethernet module solution, the I-RJ45. It combines a single- or dual-port RJ45 connector and simplifies integration for industrial Ethernet by supporting various industrial network applications including sensors and transmitters, gateways, operator terminals and remote I/O.

Renesas RJ45 Ethernet Module
Renesas RJ45 Ethernet Module

This new device is an intelligent RJ45 module that comes with specialized embedded software that supports multiple industrial Ethernet protocol stacks. The software package and sample codes provide system manufacturers with a complete set of tools and frameworks to build their application. This helps to prototype systems, reducing the time needed for industrial network protocol integration. The modules are 50 x 17.5 x 12mm (single) and 50 x 35 x 12mm (dual).

With a general Application Programmable Interface (API), the application can easily be connected to the protocol software. It offers a seamless integration path to other Renesas ASSP solutions. The single-port version of the RJ45 module is based on the RX64M microcontroller (MCU) Group and the dual-port module solution includes the R-IN32M3 industrial Ethernet communication chip.

Renesas also offers a solution kit version of the module that consists of a single or dual-port industrial Ethernet module attached to an adapter board for development. This adapter board enhances the module to connect with Arduino and Pmod interfaces, which enables it to connect to other Renesas MCU development boards including Renesas Synergy™ and RX. The Ethernet module solution kit also includes a quick start-up guide, a USB cable and a CD with software and documentation.

Samples of the I-RJ45 industrial Ethernet module solution are now available worldwide. The mass production is scheduled to begin in Q3, 2018. The industrial Ethernet module solution kit may be available in April 2018 and projected price of €299.00 per kit.

More information is available at the product page of Renesas.

OSD3358-SM-RED – A Reference, Evaluation, And Development Board From Octavo Systems

The OSD3358-SM-RED from Octavo Systems is a reference, evaluation, and development board for the OSD335x-SM series of System-in-Package (SiP) devices. It is powered by a 1 GHz processor, ADC, and 1 GB of DDR2 RAM into an enclosure of the size of a coin.

OSD3358-SM-RED single-board computer

The SiP needs a PCB, along with components like an Ethernet jack, power supply, IO pins, and USB sockets to communicate with the other complimentary electronic parts. These boards include several power options, including a micro-USB connector, barrel jack, and solder points for battery usage. Ethernet and USB connectors are included, along with expansion connectors setup so that BeagleBone Black Capes can be connected directly. Finally, a 9-axis IMU, barometer, and temperature sensor are included. Data from sensors can be collected directly without the help of extra hardware or software.

This board is longer and slightly wider than a Raspberry Pi, at an exact dimension of 108 x 54 mm. It’s also thicker at 32 mm due to the decision to mount the Ethernet jack on top of the two USB ports. A micro-SD card slot is included, though WiFi capability is not provided. For internet connectivity, the user needs to rely on wired or dongle connection.

It comes pre-loaded with a Debian Linux distribution, complete with drivers for the onboard sensors already available. It can also boot off of the SD card to load other Operating Systems. This board can be used in one of three ways: as a standalone device, a USB client, or using a UART port as a Linux terminal. In the standalone case, the user simply connects the micro-USB connector to an appropriate power source, then to a monitor via a micro-HDMI to HDMI adapter. Once booted up, the screen goes to a minimal Linux install, allowing the user to access a web browser, terminal, and other necessary tools that a developer can build upon.

At a cost of $199, this board wouldn’t be an appropriate substitute for a Raspberry Pi or BeagleBone in standalone situations, but it will certainly be useful for a professional upgrade to OSD335x-SM SiPs.

Linux-driven COM And Carrier Board Powered by Zynq SoC

MYIR Tech has launched an $85 module, Xilinx Zynq-7010 or -7007S that runs on MYC-C7Z010/007S CPU Module. MYC-C7Z010/007S CPU Module is a part of their newly launched sandwich-style, $209 MYD-Y7Z010/007S Development Board. There’s an open source Linux 3.15.0 based BSP for the module, and the MYD-Y7Z010/007S carrier board ships with schematics. Both the module and development board can withstand -40 to 85°C temperature range.

MYC-C7Z010/007S CPU Module

MYC-C7Z010/007S CPU Module
MYC-C7Z010/007S CPU Module

Xilinx’s Zynq-7010 has dual-core Arm Cortex-A9 block as the Zynq-7015 or Zynq-7020, which is available along with the Z010 on the earlier MYC-C7Z010/20 module. However, the Zynq-7010 SoC has more FPGA logic cells (28K). On the other hand, the Zynq-7007S is limited to a single Cortex-A9 core and a 23K logic cell FPGA. The Zynq-7010 ranges from 667MHz to 866MHz while the 7007S can operate from 667MHz to 766MHz.

The MYC-C7Z010/007S has 75 x 50mm dimension. It ships with 512MB DDR3 SDRAM4GB eMMC, and 16MB quad SPI flash. There’s a Gigabit Ethernet PHY and external watchdog. A 1.27mm 180-pin stamp-hole (Castellated-Hole) expansion interface is also there for ARM and FPGA interfaces that are useful to improve shock resistance. Supported I/O incorporates single USB and SDIO interfaces plus a pair of serial, I2C, CAN, SPI, and 16-channel ADC.

MYD-Y7Z010/007S dev board

MYD-Y7Z010/007S Dev Board
MYD-Y7Z010/007S Dev Board

The 153 x 80mm MYD-Y7Z010/007S Development Board expands the MYC-C7Z010/007S CPU module with 3x GbE ports, a USB 2.0 OTG port and a DB9 combo port with isolated RS232, RS485, and CAN signals. There’s also a microSD slot for memory expansion and a debug serial port.

An optional, $29 MYD-Y7Z010/007S I/O Cape plugs into the GPIO interface offering an HDMI port, a user button, and LCD, camera, and dual Pmod connectors. The LCD interface supports optional MYIR 7- or 4-inch capacitive and resistive LCD modules. The HDMI port only supports 720p resolution for now. The MYD-Y7Z010/007S board is further equipped with a reset key and boot switch. There’s also a 12V/2A DC input.

The MYC-C7Z010/007S module with the Zynq-7010 is available now for $85. The MYD-Y7Z010/007S Development Board is available with the Zynq-7010 based module for $209. More information is available at MYIR’s MYC-C7Z010/007S and MYD-Y7Z010/007S product pages.

USB Adaptive Charger (2.7A per port) with Wattmeter

A 10.8A, 4 port USB charger with a wattmeter and adaptive intelligent charging.

It works by taking any DC input between 7V to 17V, from an AC/DC adapter or car adapter. It can be used anywhere with wall outlets, car power ports, lead-acid batteries, DC-output solar panels, and lithium-ion battery packs (2S, 3S, and 4S).

It then drops the voltage down to 5V and intelligently adapts to match the maximum current the device being charged would accept. We believe it is the most powerful 4-port USB charger at 10.8A. No device is throttled when every port is in use.

USB Adaptive Charger (2.7A per port) with Wattmeter – [Link]

Comma AI’s Panda is a Car Hacking Dongle for Self-Driving Possibilities

Comma.ai is a self-driving car startup founded by George Hotz, the American hacker known for unlocking the iPhone and the PlayStation 3. Comma AI who originally wanted to build self-driving car kit, canceled their initial project due to safety concerns from NHTSA but later open-source their project and has now launched a Panda, an On-Board Diagnostics (OBD) II adapter that is expected to expose a car sensor data with the hopes of turning that information for self or assisted driving application.

Panda OBD-II Dongle

Panda is a small size OBD II dongle and will plug into the port of most new cars made since 1996 with preference giving to vehicles of 2010 and above. Panda supports 3 CAN (Controller Area Network), 2 LIN (Local Interconnect Network) and 1 GMLAN (General Motor Local Area Network) for access to almost all of the sensors in most of the cars on the road. It also includes WiFi and USB port to help interface with a computer and smartphone.

With a dimension of 34 mm x 50 mm x 27 mm, Panda can read a host of data. Panda will be able to measure the car speed, location (if available), fault codes, braking force, engine speed, gas level, and many more. To help parse all that information Comma AI also launched Cabana a CAN analysis tool.

Panda can be paired with Openpilot, the company’s open-source autonomous driving software and this pairing could be used to take control of a compatible vehicle’s gas, brakes, lights, and steering.

Some Specifications of Panda dongle

  • Dimensions –  34mm x 50mm x 27mm
  • Weight: 32g
  • Car Interfaces –
    • 3x CAN
    •  2x LIN
    • 1x GMLAN
  • Connectivity – USB (with fast charging support) & WiFi
  • Software Support
    • Android and iOS chffr (getchffr.com)
    • Cabana (comma CAN analysis tool)
    • Openpilot (open source self-driving)
    • Python library (pip install pandacan)
    • SocketCAN (Linux can-utils, Wireshark)
    • Wi-Fi ELM327 (Android and iOS apps)
    • Windows J2534 (Car manufacturer tools)

According to Hotz,

“the real point of shipping Panda out to people is to create that interface that cars don’t have. We want to plug cars into computers.”

Panda is available for ordering at about $99 on the comma AI product page and a GPS with no Wi-Fi variant available for $199

Infinite Noise true random number generator

This is an Open hardware USB true random number generator coming soon on crowdsupply.com

The Infinite Noise TRNG is an affordable and secure true random number generator (TRNG) based on a modular entropy multiplier technique that continuously loops over previous random output, gathering randomness from the noise of the hardware components along the way, to generate the next random output. The simplicity of this technique makes it quite robust to common attacks like signal injection. The openness of the implementation makes it and easy to inspect and verify, as all security hardware should be!

Features & Specifications

  • Default 30 KB/second of random data
  • No firmware
  • “Whitening” implemented in the driver
  • Comes with polycarbonate enclosure
  • Immune to power supply noise and RF interference
  • Uses only stock components
  • Health monitor built into host drivers
  • Multiplatform driver support (Windows, Linux, and also ARM-support)
  • Fully open source (see GitHub repo)

USB Armory: Open Source USB Stick Computer

An open source USB stick computer for security applications.

The USB Armory is full-blown computer (800MHz ARM® processor, 512MB RAM) in a tiny form factor (65mm x 19mm x 6mm USB stick) designed from the ground up with information security applications in mind. Not only does the USB Armory have native support for many Linux distributions, it also has a completely open hardware design and a breakout prototyping header, making it a great platform on which to build other hardware.

Features

USB Armory: Open Source USB Stick Computer – [Link]

Isolated USB to UART Converter for Arduino Pro Mini

Simple, tiny USB to UART converter with digital isolator working between 2.5V and 5V up to 3Mbaud, with the Arduino Pro mini connector.

It’s a USB to UART converter with a digital isolator at the UART side. It has a micro USB for connecting to the PC and a 6 pin header with the same pin-out of the Arduino Pro mini board.

The chip FT231XQ is used as interface between the USB and the UART protocol, while the Si8642 is used for isolate the board from the PC. This converter is very useful if you are working on some projects and worrying about short circuit with the main power supply. Because the isolator isolates the two sides therefore there is no electrically connection.

Specifications

  • Original FT231XQ: Compatible with almost all the operating systems and capable of variety baud rates from 300 baud up to 3 Mbaud
  • Original Si8642BB-B-IS1: Low-Power Quad-Channel Digital Isolators with isolation rating up to 2.5kV
  • Size of 40 x 17 mm
  • 4.1 mm isolation between the two sides guarantee an electrical isolation up to 1kV
  • Working between 2.5V to 5V.
  • TX and RX LEDs indicators.
  • Micro USB connector.
  • Standard 2.54mm 6 pins female header.
  • Protected by a transparent heat shrink sleeve.

The board is live on kickstarter available for funding and has 24 days to go.