Tag Archives: USB

USB 3.0 NanoHub

Muxtronics @ tindie.com designed a USB 3.0 mini hub. Source files here:

Are you familiar with my NanoHubs? Tiny, penny-sized USB hubs you can use to add additional USB ports in incredibly cramped spaces, like hacking projects or mobile devices? Whereas the original NanoHubs were all USB 2.0, limited to 480Mbps, this new NanoHub allows for transfer speeds of up to 5.0Gbps, as well as up to 3.0A of power delivery. The cut-off connector boards allow you to test your application before soldering it into your product, reducing the size of the hub from 27x34mm (about 1.1×1.3″) to 20x20mm (4/5ths of an inch on each side), with an overall thickness of just 1.55mm (1/16″).

USB 3.0 NanoHub – [Link]

RELATED POSTS

Opensource USB HUB

Christian @ hackaday.io build his own USB Hub based on GL850G IC:

I was looking to make a custom USB Hub for a project but I couldnt find any of them that worked and using the chip GL850G. The chip is pretty old and cheap, but in my case I didnt need to use any of the fast transfering USB3, probably the next version can be based on this schematic.

Opensource USB HUB – [Link]

Pastilda: Open-source Hardware Password Manager

Pastilda is an open-source hardware password manager, designed to manage your credentials in a handy and secure way.

Pastilda works as a middleman between your computer and keyboard. It provides easy and safe auto-login to your OS, bank accounts, mailboxes, corporate network or social media. Pastilda stores encrypted passwords in its memory. You can request a particular password at any time by pressing a special key combination on your keyboard.

Pastilda: Open-source Hardware Password Manager – [Link]

Orthrus – SD card secure RAID USB storage

Nick Sayer @ hackaday.io build a SD card RAID USB storage board. He writes:

This project is a hardware mechanism to provide secure “two man control” over a data store. It is a USB microSD card reader, but it requires two cards. The data is striped in the style of RAID 0, but the data is also encrypted with a key that is stored in a key storage block on each card. In essence, each card is useless without the other. With possession of both cards, the data is available without restriction, but with only one, the remaining data is completely opaque.

Orthrus – SD card secure RAID USB storage – [Link]

Data-rich 3.5mm jack vies with USB-C for headsets

Horst Gether @ edn.com writes about how the simple and well established 3.5mm jack can be used for data-rich communication between headset and mobile device.

The 3.5mm phone jack is a well-established standard in the audio industry and continues to get strong support from users in the market. Originally invented in the 19th century for telephone switch boards, it made its way into mobile phones, tablets, and personal computers to connect audio and communication headsets for phone calls or simply for listening to music. While the phone jack has a rather long evolutionary history, the functionality that the 3.5mm four-pole accessory device provides to its end customers is rather limited.

Data-rich 3.5mm jack vies with USB-C for headsets – [Link]

Reference design – USB Type-C charger delivers 18W

Graham Prophet @ eedesignnewseurope.com discuss about a 18W USB power supply reference design.

This joint reference design describes an 18W, USB PD compliant, AC-DC power converter. The design, titled DER-567, pairs the WT6630P USB Type-C PD controller from Weltrend with Power Integrations’ InnoSwitch-CP off-line CV/CC flyback switcher IC, to produce a compact and highly energy-efficient standards-compliant power adapter, that PI says will deliver faster charge times for the larger batteries required to power next-generation mobile devices.

Reference design – USB Type-C charger delivers 18W – [Link]

MPPT solar charger

Lukas Fässler from Soldernerd has been working on revised version of his MPPT Solar charger project:

Over the last few weeks I have been quite busy with my MPPT Solar Charger project. I’ve built up a first board and started writing firmware for it. Since the last version was not too different in terms of hardware I was able to re-use most of that code. But I hadn’t even touched on the whole USB stuff back then so there was still a lot of work to do. While the project is still far from being complete I am happy to say that I’ve made quite some progress. Most importantly, the new design seems to work well and so far I haven’t found any mistakes in the board layout. But let’s go through this step by step.

MPPT solar charger – [Link]

Micro Maestro 6-Channel USB Servo Controller

The Micro Maestro is the first of Pololu’s second-generation USB servo controllers. The board supports three control methods — USB for direct connection to a PC, TTL serial for use with embedded systems, and internal scripting for self-contained, host controller-free applications — and channels that can be configured as servo outputs for use with radio control (RC) servos or electronic speed controls (ESCs), digital outputs, or analog inputs. The Micro Maestro is a highly versatile six-channel servo controller and general I/O board in a highly compact (0.85 x 1.20″) package.

The extremely accurate, high-resolution servo pulses have a jitter of less than 200 ns, making this servo controller well suited for high-precision animatronics, and built-in speed and acceleration control make it easy to achieve smooth, seamless movements without requiring the control source to constantly compute and stream intermediate position updates to the Micro Maestro.

Check this intro video by Pololu to see Micro Maestro in action:

Key Features

  • Three control methods: USB, TTL (5V) serial, and internal scripting
  • 0.25μs output pulse width resolution (corresponds to approximately 0.025° for a typical servo, which is beyond what the servo could resolve)
  • Pulse rate configurable from 33 to 100 Hz
  • Wide pulse range of 64 to 3280 μs when using all six servos with a pulse rate of 50 Hz
  • Individual speed and acceleration control for each channel
  • Channels can also be used as general-purpose digital outputs or analog inputs
  • A simple scripting language lets you program the controller to perform complex actions even after its USB and serial connections are removed
  • Free configuration and control application for Windows makes it easy to:
    • Configure and test your controller
    • Create, run, and save sequences of servo movements for animatronics and walking robots
    • Write, step through, and run scripts stored in the servo controller
  • Virtual COM port makes it easy to create custom applications to send serial commands via USB to the controller
  • TTL serial features:
    • Supports 300 – 250000 kbps in fixed-baud mode
    • Supports 300 – 115200 kbps in autodetect-baud mode
    • Simultaneously supports the Pololu protocol, which gives access to advanced functionality, and the simpler Scott Edwards MiniSSC II protocol (there is no need to configure the device for a particular protocol mode)
    • Can be daisy-chained with other Pololu servo and motor controllers using a single serial transmit line
  • Board can be powered off of USB or a 5 – 16 V battery, and it makes the regulated 5V available to the user
  • Compact size of 0.85″ × 1.20″ (2.16 × 3.05 cm) and light weight of 0.17 oz (4.8 g)
  • Upgradable firmware

The Micro Maestro is the smallest of Pololu’s second-generation USB servo controllers. The Maestros are available in four sizes and can be purchased fully assembled or as partial kits. you can check other products here.

You can get your Micro Maestro for around $20 from the product’s page, and you can also learn more about this product by checking the User’s Guide.

Source: Sparkfun

Using HealthyPi with a PC for ECG,Respiration & SpO2

Ashwin K Whitchurch, Venkatesh Bhat, and Manikandan S @ hackster.io build a PC based ECG,Respiration & SpO2 monitor.

We introduced the HealthyPi as a HAT add-on for the Raspberry Pi, turning it into a full-featured, medical-grade open patient monitor. However, we realized later that people also wanted to use the board standalone with a Windows/Linux/Mac PC. We already had an on-board USB port from the SAMD21 on the board.

Using HealthyPi with a PC for ECG,Respiration & SpO2 – [Link]

Analog Discovery USB isolation

Bob tipped us with his latest article. He writes:

Back when I was developing the PSU burner, I wanted to have the Analog Discovery isolated from the common ground, to avoid noise and other issues. Since I did not have a way to do this, I ended up using a laptop on battery for measurements. But for long term, I needed to have this isolation. Unfortunately, things that can isolate USB at 480Mbps or faster are too expensive to justify.
The solution
The ADUM3160 isolator can provide a magnetically isolated 12 Mbps connection, which proved to be good enough. I grabbed one ready made isolator module from ebay for about $12, cheap enough. Well, it is not perfect: the B0505S DC/DC converter provided can only supply 1W and the Analog Discovery is a hungry beast.

Analog Discovery USB isolation – [Link]