Tag Archives: USB

USB Volume Control and Caps Lock LED

p_leriche @ instructables.com build a USB volume control which is simple, cheap and extensible. Check it out:

I’m not the first person to publish an Instructable for a USB volume control, but I think this one is about as simple and cheap as it gets, and at the same time can be extended at minimal cost to various other functions such as:

  • Mute, Play, Pause and various other media buttons
  • Keyboard LEDs such as Caps Lock, Scroll Lock and Num Lock (a kana LED is also defined for Japanese users)
  • Application launch buttons such as browser, email, calculator etc
  • Browser navigation and other application control buttons
  • Gamepad buttons
  • System buttons for functions such as Sleep, Hibernate, Wake, Power down
  • Mouse buttons and movement

and many more, subject to support being provided by your operating system. Mine implements the volume and mute functions (mute by pressing the knob) and the 3 main keyboard LEDs.

USB Volume Control and Caps Lock LED – [Link]

Designing a simple and cheap temperature logger

pickandplace.wordpress.com writes:

I started with making the TMP102 temperature sensor work. Nothing to say in particular, it’s just an other I2C-small-package-sensor. Or rather SMBus, but apart from the minimum speed clock requirements on the SMBus, the two protocols are alike.

Designing a simple and cheap temperature logger – [Link]

PCB X-mas tree

Matthias created a X-Mas tree project using the DirtyPCB boards from dangerousprotorypes.com :

The project features an USB capable PIC16F1549 µC with:

  • USB FS device
  • 48 MHz internal Oscillator
  • 2 PWM modules
  • 10-bit ADC with Voltage Reference
  • Integrated Temperature Indicator Module

The LEDs are connected to the 2 PWM outputs via N-mos drivers. A Potentiometer is connected to one ADC channel for controlling the brightness of the LEDs or possibly the speed or variation of animations. Different modes of the X-mass tree can be switched by pressing a push button.

PCB X-mas tree – [Link]

30 Minutes HIV Detection Using USB Stick

In partnership with DNA Electronics,  Imperial College London researchers had developed a revolutionary USB stick that can detect HIV in the bloodstream.

In order to detect the virus, it’s enough to use a drop of blood. Then the USB stick generates an electrical signal that can be read by a computer, laptop or handheld device.

“We have taken the job done by equipment the size of a large photocopier, and shrunk it down to a USB chip” – Dr Graham Cooke, study author

This detection is useful for HIV patients for managing their treatment and to maintain their health. The longer the detection of HIV virus the harder to treat it, because antiretroviral treatment that is used for HIV may stop changing the status due to the resistance built by the virus to the medicine. This what the USB stick is working to solve, providing accurate results in a surprisingly short time.

To implement this, researcher had worked on “a novel complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) chip based, pH-mediated, point-of-care HIV-1 viral load monitoring assay that simultaneously amplifies and detects HIV-1 RNA”.

Conventional ways to test HIV may take several days, but this device is promising to give results in less than 30 minutes! In addition, the detection can be done remotely, which allows faster detection for patients by themselves, and for some areas that don’t have advanced lab tests.

“This is a great example of how this new analysis technology has the potential to transform how patients with HIV are treated by providing a fast, accurate and portable solution. At DNAe we are already applying this highly adaptable technology to address significant global threats to health, where treatment is time-critical and needs to be right first time.” – Professor Chris Toumazou, DNAe’s Founder, Executive Chairman and Regius Professor at the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering at Imperial College London

Partnering with DNA Electronics was a great step for the researchers since this company is using similar technology to develop devices for detecting bacterial and fungal sepsis and antibiotic resistance. Right now, researchers are now looking for possibilities to advance their work and to check the ability that the device can detect other viruses such as hepatitis.

This research was funded by the National Institute for Health Research Imperial Biomedical Research Centre and it was published in Scientific Reports. You can learn more about it by checking the article “Novel pH sensing semiconductor for point-of-care detection of HIV-1 viremia” and the press release.

Single-chip USB-C buck-boost battery charger

isl9238-battery-charger-promo

Intersil’s ISL9238 and ISL9238A add 5V-20V reverse boost for USB On-The-Go charging of portables such as smartphones and headphones; two USB-C buck-boost battery chargers support bidirectional power delivery in ultrabooks, tablets, power banks and other mobile products. by Graham Prophet @ edn-europe.com:

The single-chip ISL9238 and ISL9238A battery chargers can replace two-chip solutions to reduce bill of materials (BOM) costs by up to 40%. Both ICs employ Intersil’s R3 modulation technology to extend battery life and deliver acoustic noise-free operation, improved light-load efficiency and fast transient response. The ISL9238 and ISL9238A operate in forward buck, boost or buck-boost mode to fast charge mobile battery packs with up to 4-cell Li-ion batteries.

Single-chip USB-C buck-boost battery charger – [Link]

Programming ESP8266 With Arduino IDE : The Easy Way

The ESP8266 WiFi Module is a self-contained SOC that can give any microcontroller access to your WiFi network. It’s an extremely cost-effective board with a huge and ever-growing community. Each ESP8266 module comes pre-programmed with an AT command set firmware. This module has a powerful on-board processing and storage capability that allows it to act as a standalone microcontroller.

Following 2 easy steps, you can upload Arduino sketches on your ESP8266 using Arduino IDE.

  • Configuring the IDE
  • Making the circuit

Parts List:

  1. ESP 8266 Module.
  2. Jumper wires.
  3. A breadboard.
  4. One USB to TTL converter, a.k.a UART converter.

Configuring The IDE:

In order to bring support for ESP8266 chips to the Arduino environment, you need to add ESP8266 Arduino Core in the IDE.

NOTE: You must have Arduino IDE version 1.6.4 or higher. The latest version is highly recommended. Download the latest version of IDE from Arduino.cc.

  1. Install Arduino 1.6.8.
  2. Start Arduino and open Preferences window.
  3. Enter http://arduino.esp8266.com/stable/package_esp8266com_index.json into Additional Board Manager URLs field. (See the first image)
  4. Open Boards Manager from Tools > Board menu and install esp8266 platform. (See the second image)

Add URL to "Preferences" in Arduino IDE

Add URL to “Preferences” in Arduino IDE

Select ESP8266 board from Board Manager

Select ESP8266 board from Board Manager

Making The Circuit:

ESP8266-01 wiring for uploading program
ESP8266-01 wiring for uploading program
ESP8266-12E wiring for uploading program
ESP8266-12E wiring for uploading program

ESP-01:

  1. Connect GPIO0 to Ground (set it LOW or 0)
  2. Connect CH_PD toVcc (set it HIGH or 1)

ESP-12(E/F):

  1. Connect GPIO0 to Ground (set it LOW or 0)
  2. Connect GPIO15 to Ground (set it LOW OR 0)
  3. Connect GPIO2 to Vcc (set it HIGH or 1)
  4. Connect CH_PD toVcc (set it HIGH or 1)

Pin Vcc and GND should be connected to power supply’s +ve and -ve rail respectively. TX and RX of ESP8266 should be connected to RX and TX of USB to TTL converter respectively.

NOTE: You can replace the USB to TTL converter with an Arduino UNO board, but you have to upload a blank sketch or “bare-minimum” sketch to the Arduino so that the MCU of the Arduino board doesn’t interrupt. Connect TX and RX of the ESP8266 to RX and TX of the Arduino UNO respectively.

Conclusion:

You are done! Now just select your ESP8266 board from Tools > Board menu, write any program, and click on Upload button. The ESP8266 will run as standalone microcontroller now.

To have a clear idea, read the article FLASH AT FIRMWARE TO ESP8266 also.

DueProLogic – USB-CPLD Development System

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The DueProLogic is a complete FPGA Development System designed to easily get the user started learning and creating projects.

The DueProLogic makes programmable logic easy with an all inclusive development platform. It includes an Altera Cyclone IV FPGA, on board programming, four megabit configuration flash, and an SD connector for add on memory. You can create your HDL code, program it into the flash and interact with the hardware via a Windows PC.

DueProLogic – USB-CPLD Development System – [Link]

UsbSafe² – Programmable dongle for protecting USB devices from USB hosts and chargers

usbsafe-iso-1_jpg_project-body

USB connections can transfer both information and power. UsbSafe² is a device for protecting USB-connected hardware from both excessive voltage, current and unauthorized data access. Unfortunately, the practice of “juice jacking” (accessing data from a device connected to a public charging station), has become all too common. UsbSafe² provides a unique combination of an anti-juice jacking mode with protection from faulty power sources. With UsbSafe² you’ll feel safer knowing that your valuable gadgets are protected and secured, wherever you go and whatever you plug into!

UsbSafe² – Programmable dongle for protecting USB devices from USB hosts and chargers – [Link]

DIY USB 5V Solar Power Bank

Abdulgafur tipped us with his latest project, a 5V solar powered power bank. The circuit consists of two stages, the first stage is the battery charger stage based on MCP73831 and the second stage is the step up converter based on LT1302-5 which converts the battery voltage to 5V.

Solar energy is renewable, free, widely available and clean form of energy. It is considered as a serious source of energy for many years because of the vast amounts of energy that is made freely available, if harnessed by modern technology. Many people are familiar with so-called photovoltaic cells, or solar panels, found on things like spacecraft, rooftops, and handheld calculators. The cells are made of semiconductor materials like those found in computer chips. When sunlight hits the cells, it knocks electrons loose from their atoms. As the electrons flow through the cell, they generate electricity. In this project, we are building a power bank which harvests energy by using a solar panel.

DIY USB 5V Solar Power Bank – [Link]

MPPT Solar Charger Design based on PIC18F26J50

solarchargereagletop-768x541

At the core of the design is a PIC18F26J50 in a 28 pin SOIC package. It’s capable of running at down to 2.15 volts and consumes extremely little power when running at lower clock speeds. And apart from that it features USB so we can have all the benefits of USB without any external components except, of course, a USB socket.

MPPT Solar Charger Design based on  [Link]