Tag Archives: USB

LimeSDR Mini – Software-defined-radio card

An open, full-duplex, USB stick radio for femtocells and more.

The LimeSDR and LimeSDR Mini are members of the same family of software-defined radios. One does not replace the other. Rather, they are complementary.

Simply put, the LimeSDR Mini is a smaller, less expensive version of the original LimeSDR. However, it still packs a punch – at its core, the LimeSDR Mini uses the same LMS7002M radio transceiver as its big sibling. The Mini has two channels instead of four, and, by popular demand, SMA connectors instead of micro U.FL connectors. Check out the comparison table below for more details.

LimeSDR Mini – Software-defined-radio card – [Link]

White Paper: Cut the Cord with Power over Ethernet (PoE)

Providing AC power to each device individually is an extra cost especially for organizations when installing IP cameras, VoIP phones or network access switches and routers in the facilities. To help in this way some modern protocols, like USB and Ethernet, provide the power over the same data cable. However, USB is not designed for networking and long distance network applications. Besides that, the 900 mA at 5V in USB 3.0 is suitable for low-power devices like external hard disks but can’t provide enough power for high-power devices like switches and other network instruments. For these reasons, PoE (Power over Ethernet) can be the best choice.

CAT-5/5e twisted-pair Ethernet cable. Image courtesy of: CableOrganizer

PoE can provide power up to 30W beside data connectivity on any standard CAT-5/5e twisted-pair Ethernet cable, and supports 10Base-T, 100Base-T, 100Base-TX, and 1000Base-T Gigabit Ethernet interfaces.

The LEX Computech 3I390NX Series

As an example of an SCB (Single Computer Board) that provides PoE on its ports is a board called 3I390NX from LEX COMPUTECH which is based on the latest Intel Pentium Processor N4200/ N3350/E3950 Apollo Lake processor family. The Ethernet ports are provided by the Intel Ethernet controller i1211-AT.

3I390NX SCB features are:

  • Intel Apollo Lake N4200/N3350/E3950 CPU/chipset.
  • On Board 4GB DDR3L.
  • Display: HDMI, DP, VGA & eDP.
  • 5 x GbE (4 x PoE) LAN.
  • 2 x Mini PCIe.
  • 6 x USB.
  • HD Audio.
  • 2 x COM (1 x RS232 / 422 / 485 port (external), 1 x RS232 / 422 / 485 port (internal)).
  • Hardware digital Input & Output, 8 x DI / 8 x DO.

To know more about this SCB you can preview the full white paper published on IEEE Spectrum, or download it directly from here.

FT234XD – USB to BASIC UART IC

The FT234XD is a USB to serial UART interface with optimised packaging (3mm x 3mm 12 pin DFN) for smaller PCB designs and the following advanced features. Check datasheet on the link below.
FT234XD – USB to BASIC UART IC – [Link]

PD Buddy Sink – USB Power Delivery for everyone

Clayton G. Hobbs @ hackaday.io published some details of his project, a USB power delivery board. He writes:

USB Power Delivery is a cool standard for getting lots of power—up to 100 W—from a USB Type-C port. Being an open standard for supplying enough power to charge phones, laptops, and just about anything else under the sun, USB PD is poised to greatly reduce the amount of e-waste produced worldwide from obsolete proprietary chargers. Unfortunately, like all USB standards, it’s quite complex, putting it out of reach of the average electronics hobbyist.

PD Buddy Sink – USB Power Delivery for everyone – [Link]

Opendime v2 – Genuine Verified Bitcoin Credit Stick

Opendime announced their USB stick that allows you to spend Bitcoin like a dollar bill:

Opendime is a small USB stick that allows you to spend Bitcoin like a dollar bill. Pass it along multiple times. Connect to any USB to check balance. Unseal anytime to spend online.

Hopefully everyone who needed an Opendime for Christmas has got it under the tree already, because we are now out of stock! But the big news is we’ve redesigned the hardware and improved it. Same price, same concept, but some useful improvements.

Opendime v2 – Now Genuine Verified Bitcoin Credit Stick – [Link]

USB 3.0 NanoHub

Muxtronics @ tindie.com designed a USB 3.0 mini hub. Source files here:

Are you familiar with my NanoHubs? Tiny, penny-sized USB hubs you can use to add additional USB ports in incredibly cramped spaces, like hacking projects or mobile devices? Whereas the original NanoHubs were all USB 2.0, limited to 480Mbps, this new NanoHub allows for transfer speeds of up to 5.0Gbps, as well as up to 3.0A of power delivery. The cut-off connector boards allow you to test your application before soldering it into your product, reducing the size of the hub from 27x34mm (about 1.1×1.3″) to 20x20mm (4/5ths of an inch on each side), with an overall thickness of just 1.55mm (1/16″).

USB 3.0 NanoHub – [Link]

RELATED POSTS

Opensource USB HUB

Christian @ hackaday.io build his own USB Hub based on GL850G IC:

I was looking to make a custom USB Hub for a project but I couldnt find any of them that worked and using the chip GL850G. The chip is pretty old and cheap, but in my case I didnt need to use any of the fast transfering USB3, probably the next version can be based on this schematic.

Opensource USB HUB – [Link]

Pastilda: Open-source Hardware Password Manager

Pastilda is an open-source hardware password manager, designed to manage your credentials in a handy and secure way.

Pastilda works as a middleman between your computer and keyboard. It provides easy and safe auto-login to your OS, bank accounts, mailboxes, corporate network or social media. Pastilda stores encrypted passwords in its memory. You can request a particular password at any time by pressing a special key combination on your keyboard.

Pastilda: Open-source Hardware Password Manager – [Link]

Orthrus – SD card secure RAID USB storage

Nick Sayer @ hackaday.io build a SD card RAID USB storage board. He writes:

This project is a hardware mechanism to provide secure “two man control” over a data store. It is a USB microSD card reader, but it requires two cards. The data is striped in the style of RAID 0, but the data is also encrypted with a key that is stored in a key storage block on each card. In essence, each card is useless without the other. With possession of both cards, the data is available without restriction, but with only one, the remaining data is completely opaque.

Orthrus – SD card secure RAID USB storage – [Link]

Data-rich 3.5mm jack vies with USB-C for headsets

Horst Gether @ edn.com writes about how the simple and well established 3.5mm jack can be used for data-rich communication between headset and mobile device.

The 3.5mm phone jack is a well-established standard in the audio industry and continues to get strong support from users in the market. Originally invented in the 19th century for telephone switch boards, it made its way into mobile phones, tablets, and personal computers to connect audio and communication headsets for phone calls or simply for listening to music. While the phone jack has a rather long evolutionary history, the functionality that the 3.5mm four-pole accessory device provides to its end customers is rather limited.

Data-rich 3.5mm jack vies with USB-C for headsets – [Link]