Tag Archives: VFD

Arduino VFD Display Clock Tutorial

1,232 

0

FP770N2IBL0P092.MEDIUM

by Kesselwagen @ instructables.com

Vacuum fluorescent displays look really kinda fancy and cool to me, I really love the blue-breen color. That’s why I decided to write this Instructable about a clock based on this technology. This is my first instructable here, showing you how I have designed built my clock and how you can build yourself exactly the same or a similar clock that utilizes the VFD display. I’m not a native speaker – just for you to know if you’re wondering why some sentences might make no sense at all.

Arduino VFD Display Clock Tutorial – [Link]

VFD Modular Clock IV-18 SMT

 

vfd-smt-iv18-31

VFD Modular Clock IV-18 SMT edition is a special solder-free kit version of the original VFD Modular Clock . The firmware is mbed based and is freely available at http://developer.mbed.org/teams/Akafugu/code/vfd_modular_clock_mbed/

Features:

  • IV-18 8-digit Russian VFD Display Tube
  • Open source mbed based firmware
  • LPC1347 ARM Cortex-M3 64kb microcontroller
  • GPS (option)
  • Four Letter Word
  • Easy to update firmware with no special drivers required (LPC1347 usb bootloader)

VFD Modular Clock IV-18 SMT – [Link]

Teardown, Repair and Analysis of an Agilent E3642A DC Power Supply

TheSignalPathBlog @ youtube.com:

In this episode Shahriar attempts a repair of an Agilent E3642A DC Power Supply which is completely non-responsive. After presenting a teardown of the power supply, the GPIB interface is used to verify the functionality of the power supply. The problem is traced to the main display unit which communicated with the main power supply via a serial interface.

After disassembly of the display, it is revealed that the entire unit has suffered a catastrophic failure due to the VFD display drive IC. All components must be individually removed and replaced. Unfortunately the main processor is a Mask ROM IC version (80C51) and cannot be sourced. Can you help Shahriar find a replacement part?

Teardown, Repair and Analysis of an Agilent E3642A DC Power Supply – [Link]

ChronodeVFD: Wearable Electronics VFD Wristwatch

15544764266_8e4625878c_z

by johngineer.com:

The ChronodeVFD is a personal project I’ve been working on for a couple of months. It’s a wristwatch built around the IVL2-7/5 VFD display tube. I originally purchased a few of these tubes to build a standard desk clock, but after playing around with them, I realized I could probably build a wristwatch too. The tube has a number of features which make it more suited than most Soviet-surplus VFDs for this purpose.

ChronodeVFD: Wearable Electronics VFD Wristwatch – [Link]

New Product – VFD Moduar Clock IV-4 6-digit

102 total views, no views today

0

vfd-38

VFD Moduar Clock IV-4 6-digit  by akafugu.jp:

This new shield design for the VFD Modular Clock is a variant of the original IV-4 shield, but with 6 digits. IV-4 tubes are Russian 16-segment VFD tubes, and can display numerals and the letters A-Z.

We’ve also designed a completely new enclosure for the IV-4 6-digit shield. It uses 2mm semi-transparent blue acrylic, and is designed to give a low-profile rounded appearance.

Creating a 6-digit IV-4 shield without redesigning the base board presented a unique challenge: The HV5812 driver used to drive the VFD tubes has 20 channels. IV-4 tubes are 16 segment displays, 20 – 16 = 4, so in other words the HV5812 driver can only support 4 IV-4 tubes.

New Product – VFD Moduar Clock IV-4 6-digit – [Link]

VFD filament driver using 555

vfdfilamentdriver-600x450

Kerry Wong documented his VFD filament driver built:

I recently salvaged a vacuum fluorescent display (VFD) from a piece of old test gear. The VFD is a 13 digit 7-segment multiplexed display and I thought it would look great in a custom digital clock or something similar. While it has the model number FUTABA 13-MT-54NA, I could not find any information on the internet specifically for this model. Of course, before I could put this vacuum fluorescent display to use in my final project, I needed to first build a driver circuit to drive this display.

[via]

VFD filament driver using 555 – [Link]

IV-11 VFD Tube Clock Final Design

157 

0

Haris Andrianakis writes:

This is a project i designed a year ago but never built, because of not enough spare time. This month i found some free time so i started building it and i send the pcb layout for manufacturing.

All started when i received some IV-11 vfd tubes from an ebay seller i ordered from and i started testing and prototyping by first trying to simple light up the VFD tube.

A VFD tube works like a 7-segment led display with some small differences.

A) The Filaments. The Filaments exists to power the tube. We have to supply these two pins with 1.2Volt and nothing more (polarity doesn’t matter).

B) The Grid. The Grid is like the common anode of a 7-Segment LED display. So the Grid has to be pushed high at 60Volt (in these tubes) in order the segments to be able to light up.

C) The Segments. The Segments light’s up simple by pushing them high at 60Volt.

IV-11 VFD Tube Clock Final Design – [Link]

Vacuum Fluorescent Display & Teensyduino

Getting Started- Vacuum Fluorescent Display & Teensyduino | A work in progress….  [via]

This is a quick tutorial on getting a VFD working with an Arduino (or Arduino equivalent system). VFDs are beautiful devices with a wonderful hexagonal mesh of wires and this lovely green/blue glow. Operating at around 5V, they offer a nice alternative to high voltage Nixie tubes, while still retaining a lot of the charm.

This tutorial will show you how to connect a Arduino-like device to a VFD display as well as a basic program to display text.

Vacuum Fluorescent Display & Teensyduino – [Link]

Vacuum Fluorescent Display & Teensyduino

Getting Started- Vacuum Fluorescent Display & Teensyduino | A work in progress….  [via]

This is a quick tutorial on getting a VFD working with an Arduino (or Arduino equivalent system). VFDs are beautiful devices with a wonderful hexagonal mesh of wires and this lovely green/blue glow. Operating at around 5V, they offer a nice alternative to high voltage Nixie tubes, while still retaining a lot of the charm.

This tutorial will show you how to connect a Arduino-like device to a VFD display as well as a basic program to display text.

Vacuum Fluorescent Display & Teensyduino – [Link]

Using VFD display with Arduino

Using VFD display with Arduino – [via]

Summer of 2010 I picked up an Arduino board from adafruit and took some time to walk through all of the tutorials available with it. Since then I have spent most of my time on other projects including my bachelor’s. Recently I have obtained the Motor Party Pack, LoL Shield Kit, and a 20×2 VFD (Vacuum Fluorescent Display) to go with the original board so my interest is sparked again. I have found that the Motor Party Pack and LoL Shield have adequate instruction and tutorials, but the VFD is lacking in beginner level instructions to get started. As such I have decided to write a tutorial for the 20×2 VFD available through adafruit.

The adafruit VFD is made by Samsung and is model No. 20T202DA2JA, this is really unimportant though as adafruit is nice enough to link you to the spec sheets for both the module and the controller chip. What you would be looking for is the pin-out found on page 4 of the module controller sheet.

Using VFD display with Arduino – [Link]