Tag Archives: voice

Espressif Systems is bringing voice enabled kit to makers and developers

Voice Assistants are becoming more widely accepted, devices like Amazon Echo, Sonos On, and Google Home devices are seeing the larger market share. The mounting interest in voice assistants and voice-activated platforms is leading to new ways of communicating, and in theory, creating additional channels to drive revenue.

It’s estimated that 30% of searches will be done without a screen in the next years, that there will be 21.4 million smart speakers in the US by 2020, and 2019 could put the voice recognition market to a $601 million industry. Amazon is paving the way for the possibility of these predictions with their goal of “Alexa on all Every Devices”, and the launch of the Amazon Alexa Voice development kit that will allow manufacturers easily integrate Alexa into their products. The voice-based platform could be the next stealth thing, after all, it’s easier to voice out your thoughts than type them out.

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The Shanghai-based Chinese manufacturer Espressif Systems known for their famous ESP8266, is releasing its own voice development kit, the ESP32 LyraTD MSI HDK (Hardware Development Kit” also known as “Audio Mic HDK”, was recently announced on Twitter with this question – “does anyone need something like that?”

The Audio Mic HDK is powered by the ESP32, comes embedded with Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 4.1 LE and as a four-microphone array with dual speaker output ports. It provides support for micro SD Card which can be used for storing audio files, and provides support for – UART, SPI, I2C, I2S, and JTAG through its breakout expansion pins.

Targeting applications in the areas of wireless audio, voice assistant, and home appliances. The kit supports all major cloud voice vendors such as – Amazon Alexa, Google Assistant, and Baidu DuerOS. It supports soft decoder and keyword recognition on the ESP32 processor.

The following are the Espressif Audio Mic HDK specifications:

  • Wireless Module – ESP32-WROVER module
  • Connectivity –
    • 802.11 b/g/n WiFi
    • Bluetooth 4.1 LE
  • DSP – 4-mic array chip
  • Storage – micro SD card
  • Audio –
    • Audio driver chip
    • Earphone jack
    • Dual speaker output ports
    • 4x microphone array with up to 3-meter sensitivity while playing music
  • Expansion –
    • I2C/SPI header
    • 6-pin UART header
    • I2S header
  • Debugging – USB-UART micro USB interface (based on CP2102N), and JTAG header
  • Misc –
    • Power switch
    • 8x keys on top
  • Power Supply – 5V via micro USB port

It’s unclear when the board is intended to be fully available for the public and the prices are currently unavailable.

The Little Buddy Talker – Arduino Compatible Speech Chip Set

Small, versatile, fun, and inexpensive! Use the 254 word library to bring speech to your Arduino projects! Speak, Arduino, Speak!

About a year ago, I designed an Arduino shield that allowed for you to add voice to your electronic designs.  I’ve since been able to minimise that design into a much less inexpensive, and smaller unit.  This unit has a 254 word library that consists of colours, commands, months/days/time, numbers, directions, feelings, units of measurement, security words, math lingo, and general words; all of which are spoken by “Lucy” – A lovely female voice with an English accent! Meet “The Little Buddy Talker” Arduino compatible speech kit set!  It is Production Ready, and eager to land in your hands!

The project is live on kickstarter and has 29 days to go.

Homebrew Multimode Digital Voice Modem adapter

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Florian Wolters made his own version of MMDVM adapter:

During experiments with digital voice mode in hamradio I discovered a nice project describing an adapter for D-Star, DMR and other digital modes based on an Arduino Due and a little PCB to be put on top. This unit is called the Multimode Digital Voice Modem or MMDVM (see [1]). It seems that this is getting quite popular because hard- and software is Open Source.

Homebrew Multimode Digital Voice Modem adapter – [Link]

Controlling Arduino using your Voice

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bluehybrid @ instructables.com shows us how to use your voice to control a led light on Arduino. To achieve this he used the 1Sheeld Arduino shield.

This Project is getting start to use arduino with 1Sheeld

In this project we will turn an LED (ON) and turn it (OFF) by Voice

We will say “Open” to turn it (ON) and “Close” to turn it (OFF)

Controlling Arduino using your Voice – [Link]

Voice Changer

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Voice Changer project can be used to transpose or distort one’s voice by encoding the sound appearing at the Microphone input. This project is built around AP8072 IC.

Specifications

  • Supply input : 6 VDC @ 200 mA
  • Output : Speaker, 8 Ω / 0.5 W
  • Audio amplifier type LM386 with volume control preset
  • Jumper selectable tone frequency for encoding sound
  • 4 Tones to choose
  • Built in noise reduction circuit for reducing environment noise
  • On/Off Jumper connector for power supply input
  • Berg connector for power supply input and speaker output
  • Four mounting holes of 3.2 mm each
  • PCB dimensions 48 mm x 52 mm

Voice Changer – [Link]

Speech Recognition with Arduino and BitVoicer Server

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leandro4b @ instructables.com shows us how to control some LED using your voice. He used an Arduino board and BitVoicer server to make this happen.

In this Instructable I am going to show how to use an Arduino board and BitVoicer Server to control a few LEDs with voice commands. I will be using the Arduino Micro in this Instructable, but you can use any Arduino board you have at hand.

Speech Recognition with Arduino and BitVoicer Server – [Link]

How to use a Serial Voice Recognition Module

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by codebender_cc @ instructables.com:

In this tutorial you will learn how to use a voice recognition – serial – module with the Arduino uno board. This module can store up to 15 voice commands. Those are divided into 3 groups, with 5 commands in each group.

First we should train the module with voice instructions group by group. After that, we should import one group before it could recognize the 5 voice instructions within that group.If we need to implement instructions in other groups, we should import the group first. Only one group can be active per time.

In this tutorial we will use an RGB LED and we will try to change the color of it with voice commands.

How to use a Serial Voice Recognition Module – [Link]