Tag Archives: Wifi

Starling – WiFi enabled LED Display

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Starling is a modular, Open Source LED display with WiFi connectivity. It comes with a mobile app for easy configuration and usage and has hardware support for Bluetooth.

The LED matrix is driven by an Atmega8 microcontroller (MCU), instead of a standard ASIC. This provides a lot of flexibility in the firmware. The firmware detects and assigns IDs to newly plugged-in modules. The microcontroller also stores font tables; hence if ASCII is sent on the serial (UART) port of the MCU, ASCII is what will be displayed on the matrix. Since the firmware detects adjacent displays, it can easily decide if it needs to display static or scrolling text.

Starling – WiFi enabled LED Display – [Link]

Wi-Fi and OLED Upgrade for MightyOhm Geiger Counter

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Dan Watson @ syncchannel.blogspot.com wanted to have more fun with his MightyOhm Geiger Counter so decided to add an OLED display and Wifi capability to it. To achieve that he modified the counter, added a Feather HUZZAH ESP8266 with OLED FeatherWing and wrote some code. The process is documented on his blog:

I assembled my Geiger counter kit from MightyOhm some time ago. It’s a very fun kit and the finished counter looks awesome. Oh, that Geiger-Muller tube sitting on that yellow PCB! I’ve always wanted to modify it somehow and add functionality. Today I realized that an Adafruit Feather sits PERFECTLY where the AAA battery holder normally goes. Doesn’t it look like they belong together?

Wi-Fi and OLED Upgrade for MightyOhm Geiger Counter – [Link]

Wearable WiFi Detector


A WiFi (Wireless Fidelity) is a technology that uses the 2.4GHz UHF and 5GHz SHF ISM radio bands to allow devices such as computers, smartphones, digital cameras, tablet computers, etc. to network. Nowadays the WiFi technology is being used by cities to provide free or low-cost Internet access to residents. The WiFi is inexpensive and is easy to setup but it is also unobtrusive. The people may not know that they are in a hotspot unless they open their smartphones or tablets and stream movies on it.

This reference design is a simple circuit that helps WiFi users determine if there is a hotspot nearby. The circuit uses a WiFi chip, a crystal, an SPI flash and some other external components to detect if there is a WiFi network available within the area. The WiFi chip is programmed to spot wireless networks and display the result on a small light emitting diode (LED) connected to one of the GPIO pins of the WiFi chip. The LED will just keep on blinking if there is no wireless network available within the area. As soon as the WiFi chip detects a network, the LED will stop blinking and become steady.

The prototype of this circuit must be in small size so that it is wearable. The WiFi chip and the LED with the battery can be soldered into two different PCBs to make the prototype smaller. The TE Connectivity 87220-8 male and 5-534237-6 female header then connects the WiFi and the LED PCBs. The WiFi chip only consumes small power especially when it is in standby mode. But to conserve power when it is not used, the user can turn OFF the WiFi detector using the TE Connectivity MLL1200S slide switch.

Wearable WiFi Detector – [Link]

ESP8266 Troubleshooting Guide

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In this article Rui Santos help us solve the main issues that may arise when trying to flash a new firmware or uploading scripts on ESP8266 Wifi module. He discuss about NodeMCU flasher and how to use it successfully and also he discuss about ESPlorer IDE and it’s use.

ESP8266 Troubleshooting Guide – [Link]

Remote WiFi DHT11 Temperature an Humidity Display

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BoianM @ instructables.com shows us how to build a remote temperature and humidity display using DHT11 sensor and two ESP8266 modules. To program the ESP8266 modules a visual programming software is used.

The advantage of the ESP8266 over Arduino and other controllers is the builtin Wi-Fi. In this Instructable I will show you how with the help of Visuino you can use two ESP8266 modules to make a remote LCD Display for Temperature and Humidity DHT11 sensor.

Remote WiFi DHT11 Temperature an Humidity Display – [Link]

Building a low cost wifi camera

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Johan @ johan.kanflo.com build his own Wifi webcam combining an Arducam Mini and a ESP8266 Wifi module. The result is the Esparducam board!

Sometime ago I came across the Arducam Mini which is quite a nice camera module from UCTronics. It is a small PCB with a two megapixel OmniVision OV2640 sensor, an interchangeable lens and an FPGA to do the heavy lifting of image processing and JPEG encoding.

Building a low cost wifi camera – [Link]

Sparkfun: First Impressions of the ESP32

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Jimb0 @ sparkfun.com takes a first look on the new ESP32 WiFi board by Espressif that’s an improvement of the ESP8266 board.

The ESP32 doesn’t replace the ESP8266, but it does improve on it in every aspect. Not only does it have WiFi support, but it also features a Bluetooth 4.2 radio, making it even more versatile. The CPU is similar to the ESP8266 – it’s a 32-bit Xtensa® LX6, but the ESP32 has two cores! There’s also 128KB of ROM and 416KB SRAM, but Flash memory (for program and data storage) is still left up to an external chip (up to 64MB).

Sparkfun: First Impressions of the ESP32 – [Link]