Tag Archives: Wifi

ESP8266 Desktop Clock – WiFi Synchronised

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This project is a wifi synchronised desktop clock using 7-segment displays. The heart of the project is a ESP8266 board.

The ESP8266 is a awesome chip; with integrated WiFi, 80MHz clock speed, total 160kb RAM, 512kb of flash memory, and a ton of other features, it makes a regular Arduino look like a joke. The project shown in this Instructable is based solely on the ESP8266-01 module, unlike several other projects on the web where it is used in tandem with another microcontroller. This makes it great demonstration of the capabilities of the ESP chip.

ESP8266 Desktop Clock – WiFi Synchronised – [Link]

Control an electrical appliance with your smartphone – WiFi

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Ruben Marc Speybrouck show us how to control a device using your tablet or smartphone. To achieve that he used arduino, blynk and a wemos / ESP8266 board.

In this tutorial we will be making something I call a wifi controlled ac switch. (But iy also works for DC applications that are powered by a wall outlet) Basically we will make a small box that can control any ac electric current in your home, based on commands from your tablet or smartphone. On top of that it can be programmed to react to input from any kind of sensor. Tailored to your needs and limited only by your imagination.

Control an electrical appliance with your smartphone – WiFi – [Link]

ESP8266 Wifi controlled Home Automation

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geekrex @ instructables.com shows us how to use ESP8266 Wifi module for home automation. He writes:

ESP8266 is a great thing for starting to Wifi And IOT. It is also cheap and be used for making cool projects connected to the Internet .Learn how to make a simple IOT Project with it ESP8266 WLAN Module could be a self contained SOC with integrated TCP/IP protocol stack that may offer any microcontroller access to your WLAN network.

ESP8266 Wifi controlled Home Automation – [Link]

Door Status Monitor using the ESP8266

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Rui Santos tipped us with this tutorial on how to monitor the status of your door using an ESP8266.

In this project you’re going to monitor the status of a door using an ESP8266. The goal of this project is to show the endless possibilities that this $4 WiFi module offers when integrates with a free platform that I’m about to show you.

Door Status Monitor using the ESP8266 – [Link]

Raspberry Pi Wifi module without USB

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This board will let you add WiFi functionality to your Raspberry Pi Zero without having to sacrifice the only available high speed USB port. The board is based on ESP8266 Wifi module.

WiFi on a Raspberry Pi using the HAT connector and an ESP8266. The goal of this project is to add WiFi to the Raspberry Pi Zero while keeping the USB port free for devices or OTG connection to another host.

Raspberry Pi Wifi module without USB – [Link]

Control ESP8266 over the internet

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Here is a basic tutorial on how to control ESP8266 over the internet using two buttons on a browser window. The article goes through Arduino IDE configuration and example code is included.

There are but a few things better than (succesfully) programming and using your Arduino. Surely one of those things is using your ESP8266 as an Arduino with WiFi!

Control ESP8266 over the internet – [Link]

VoCore: A Cheap And Coin-sized Linux Computer With Wi-Fi

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VoCore is an open source hardware that runs OpenWRT Linux. This tiny computer comes with Wi-Fi, USB, 20+ GPIOs that will help you to embed it on your projects.

With each passing day, mini computer boards are getting more and more popular. Single board computers like Raspberry Pi, CHIP, OrangePi etc. are being endorsed by makers and DIY enthusiasts to create new innovations. However, if you are looking for an even smaller Linux computer, VoCore is the perfect device for you.

VoCore: A Cheap And Coin-sized Linux Computer With Wi-Fi – [Link]

External antenna modifications for the Raspberry Pi 3

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In this post dorkbotpdx.org show us a couple of different ways that an external antenna can be added to the Raspberry Pi 3.

It’s not clear why an external antenna is not an option for the Pi 3, there are a number of possible reasons and I don’t presume to know the Raspberry Pi Foundation’s exact rationale. It could be to improve the out-of-box experience, an integrated antenna “just works” and there’s no potential for the antenna connector to be broken plugging in an antenna. It could be to reduce complexity, the unit with an integrated antenna is compact and self-contained.

External antenna modifications for the Raspberry Pi 3 – [Link]