Jump to content
Electronics-Lab.com Community

Hey all. New member ere. Little help please??


sinn
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi,

first of all, i'd like to say it's been an interesting read of the forum topics.

I'd like help on something.

I have a nickel coil, that glows hot due to high pressures within an internal combustion engine. The two ends of the coil aren't linked to anything; the coil only glows because the pressures are so high, and not because of a current induction or anything.

Since the two ends of the coil are free, is there anyway that I could wire up the coil to something that would limit it's heating under the high pressures?? Would Infra Red emitting nicket respond to any type of frequency of some sort.

I'd like to be in a position where I could apply some sort of input (within the two ends) and prevent the coil from heating up.

I hope this doesn't sound too odd  ::) Well it's worth asking  ;D

Looking forward to any ideas / suggestions. thanks all!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Ante,

well the coil must be heating (glowing) since it is igniting the fuel mixture.

I have checked for potential difference between the two ends, but were're talking very very small voltages (microvolts).

It's probably a silly question, but if I linked the two ends, wouldn't the wire stop glowing, since energy from the heated wire is being extracted?? I've tried this, but the effects are negligible. Is there a way where I could amplify the effect.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi sinn

What kind of engine is this? A stationary engine? A truck engine? Any other
kind of engine? Can this coils be removed in a simple way(without dismantling
the engine)? Are they electrically insulated? Is it glow plugs, found in some
diesel engines? Questions are many, since you didn't supply us with enough
information in the beginning, before you can get an answer.

//Staigen

Link to comment
Share on other sites


Hi sinn

What kind of engine is this? A stationary engine? A truck engine? Any other
kind of engine? Can this coils be removed in a simple way(without dismantling
the engine)? Are they electrically insulated? Is it glow plugs, found in some
diesel engines? Questions are many, since you didn't supply us with enough
information in the beginning, before you can get an answer.

//Staigen


Hey,
apologies for not going into much detail.
Yes it is a glow engine. The principles of the glow engine is as follows:
"as the piston reaches the top of the cyclinder, the huge increase in pressures makes the nickel wire glow red hot. This glowing nickel wire ignites the fuel mixture".
My problem is that i'm using a very powerful fuel that has a tendency to pre-ignite, in other words, the nickel wire is glowing too soon. I was hoping to discuss a potential method to maybe delay this glowing. Yes you're right, I don't want to totally shut off the glowing effect, since this would shut off the engine. I'd just like to limit it.
Like I mentioned earlier, the two ends of the nickel wire are free; is there any input that could limit the heating effect?

Thanks all!
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi sinn

If the diesel engine you have is preigniting the fuel injection pump is
adjusted wrong. Maybee there is something wrong with the injection
nozzles too. If the engine starts to glow then run for your life, it's soon
will explode, and you can get hit by parts flying around! Why do you run
it with fuel that it is not constructed for?

//Staigen

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sure the pressure can be reduced, but it is almost impossible to calculate the absolute perfect pressure that will cause the plug to start glowing.

I am using more powerful fuel for big gains in performance. It's a little project.

I was hoping there'd be a more simpler electronic method to limit the heating effect of the nickel coil.

Does metal emitting InfraRed respond to any type of resonance/input/etc??

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think so as the glowing of the wire has nothing to do with current flow. It is purely resdidual heat from the previous firing. As the fuel is compressed the flash point of the fuel lowers and bang.

To start a glow plug engine you need to apply a voltage to the plug. This is removed once it has started. The burning fuel keeps the wire glowing until the next cycle.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
  • Create New...