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Preparing for the corporate world


slackjack
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I will be graduating in 2 yrs with a bachelors degree in computer engineering. I want to know whats the best way to prepare for the "real world". What should I start doing from now to best prepare myself for post-college jobs. I want to avoid receiving a blow in the face.

Any advice would be great.


--thank you  :)

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Hi slackjack!  ;D

the best way to prepare for the "real world"?
base from experience, have more hands-on experience with your work.. you may sleep during lecture hours, but be sure to spend a lot of time in your laboratory.. the best way of learning is doing.. you may easily forget about the definitions or properties of something that you memorized for your examination but am sure there's a pretty good chance of retaining info when you learned it because you experienced it yourself.. Also, making your own projects would be nice as it increases your "experience" in the filed of Electronics..

8)
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Thanks for the input logan. I'm currently trying to make the transition from whatever theory I know to practical applications. But unfortunately its not going as smooth as I thought it would. Mayb I just need to work on a few more projects. I plan on doing this extensively during the summer vacation.

:)

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Hi jack,

I think Logan covered it very well; “hands on” is vital and should be given priority! Don’t misunderstand this but theory is sometimes unnecessary knowledge! Books are good to have in the bookshelf when you need to look something up, don’t try to learn them all by heart!

Logan, you get an “A” for this one! ;D

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Most colleges offer some type of work study program where you get credits for working in the field that you are studying. This is the best preparation. The employer benefits because they do not pay you and you benefit because you get credit for the work performed. You also get an inside look at your "soon to be" field of expertise. Get on a work study program with a firm that is in your field of study. It might turn into a job and you will be ready for the corporate world by the time you graduate. Even if you decide you do not like the firm that you worked with on the work study program, it will still give you much knowledge of what you will be up against after graduation.

MP

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Logan, you get an “A” for this one! ;D


That is because thats what happened to me.. the only electronic projects i made during my 4-yr stay in college were a soldering iron, an AM radio (assembled from a Kit complete with PCB with holes drilled already), an amplifier (also assembled), an AC/Dc converter (still from a kit) and one 200W baffles, and my Electronic Item Finder as the last..
amongst those, ONLY the EIF didn't work but that was athe project which taught me a lot..
... and that is because, i myself made it from scratch (except for the schematic)

so jack, i wish you luck with all your projects and yes.. "extensively" is a very appropriate word..

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I would suggest that you try to make room in your schedule for at least one work study per year of your last two years. If you can put more time in, then all the better. It is hard to put a lot of time into work study because you still must maintain your other coursework. I will say this: Most of the technicians I have hired, have come to the organization through work study. It also gave me a chance to see how they would perform and how well they work with the group. I am also on the advisory board for the local college, so I see the benefits of work study throughout the Electronics Industry. You should make an appointment with your counselor or appropriate school representaive for this as they will be able to tell you more about the program in your school than what I could possibly know.
Best of luck to you!

MP

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