Jump to content
Electronics-Lab.com Community
Sign in to follow this  
nickagian

Resonator datasheet needed

Recommended Posts

It makes a big difference. There are ceramic resonators for AM radios, FM radios, shortwave radios and many other applications. There are many manufacturers, shapes and sizes. Digikey lists 563 different ones for sale. Which one?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have asked for a ceramic resonator at about 10MHz for my microcontoller project and I was given this one...the only thing that is written on it is "L10.7A",which I guess shows the frequency, 10.7MHz...that is all I know about it! Oh and it has a red dot above one of the side pins..


It has an input, an output and a ground. The input and output pins can be swapped, and the center pin is probably the ground pin.


But thanks anyway, because that is what I was looking for... I didn`t know which pin is for the ground...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You have a wideband tuned circuit for shaping the IF of an FM radio. A microcontroller uses a narrowband resonator that is like a quartz crystal. Try the one you have, it might work.


Actually, that is not so. What he has is also used for microcontrollers. They are perfect for this application and much cheaper than a crystal. Just ground the middle pin and either of the outside pins can be connected to either of the clock pins on the micro. I have a drawer full of these for this application. I never use a crystal for a micro project, except for specific conditions where I need it. Resonators are commonly used instead of crystals. They take up less space on the pc board since you do not need the capacitors. It also sometimes eliminates routing problems on a pc board.

...of course, mine are much smaller than Hotwaterwizard's resonators  ;D

MP

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually, that is not so. What he has is also used for microcontrollers.
MP

His is 10.7MHz which is a wideband ceramic filter for the IF of an FM radio. Microcontrollers also use a 3-pin ceramic resonator but they are narrow-band and are 0.5% accurate.
Digikey has a 4.000MHz 3-pin ceramic resonator with the capacitors built in for only $.34US each. Ceramic filters for FM radios cost much more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sure, 10.7 MHZ is a size used for IF, but micros also use various size Crystals for specific purposes. A 10.7 MHZ Resonator (or Crystal) will give you almost 3% less error in RS232 data transmission at 57600 baud than a 10 Mhz Resonator (or Crystal). I don't know what OP purchased since I am not clairvoyant, but I would be surprised if it did not work for this purpose. Even a digital gate based clock will work for a micro.


MP

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

10.7MHz resonator will work with microcontroller, even if it is defined as working up to 10MHz maximum.
However, the problem comes when if the program is written with the frequency of 10MHz, and now working with 10.7MHz things must happen in the wrong way.
Be careful with the 3-pin ceramic resonator (pin order always is: input-ground-output), as in some devices, the manufacturer already adds the internal caps across input and output to ground, so the enduser must not use the external caps. The only way you know that is identifying part from its marking on package and look up in the manufacturer's datasheet.

ElectronicsGeek

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...