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220 volts Versus 120 volts


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1. Hi guys! i noticed that every countries have their different voltages supply..in my country we used 220volts other countries used 120volts... im just confused can u pls enlighten me...what is more economical to used 120v or 220v? advantages & disadvantages using 120V or 220V? We all know a TV that was manufactured at Japan having 120v can used to other country that have 220V using step up transformer...

2. I saw lately my friend have a halogen bulb w/ the specifications of 24Volts ac 5Owatts, the problem is he told me that the store he used to buy that bulb are out stock only available are 22.8Volts ac 50 watts...This will be used at the OR lights ( heraeusHanaulux ) ...im just confused! that the reason i come out w/ my question no. 1..What is the reason of having different voltages used to light up a bulb having a 50 watts:Is there any effect in intensity of the lights and operation of the equipments? confuse: .....By the way in our countries we used 220volts ac.

3. 220volts versus 120volts .........

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Hi Don,
I am in Canada where we have both 120VAC and 240VAC in our homes. Most things work with 120VAC but high power appliances like the stove, air conditioning and clothes dryer use 240V.

Your halogen light bulb is 22.8V or 24V and they are only 5% different so either bulb will work fine. The 22.8V bulb will be a little brighter and will burn out a little sooner with 24V.

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Like Canada, U.S. also uses both ~220 and ~110. We use the 220 to power big stuff that need a lot of power such as a stove, water furnace, washer dryer, etc...

In the U.S. we are charged by kilowatt hour. Which means, if we use the same amperage at 220, we will be charged a lot more! I would image that a device will be drawing the same amount of current at 110 or 220, provided that it can run at both voltages.

So, the disadvantage to 220, is that it will most likely coast more, however, you can run more powerful toasters off of 220...

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In the U.S. we are charged by kilowatt hour. Which means, if we use the same amperage at 220, we will be charged a lot more! I would image that a device will be drawing the same amount of current at 110 or 220, provided that it can run at both voltages.

So, the disadvantage to 220, is that it will most likely cost more, however, you can run more powerful toasters off of 220...

No. A device that operates with both voltages will draw the same power with either voltage, so the current is half when the voltage is doubled. Then the cost of the electrical power is the same.

My toaster gets pretty hot. If its power is doubled then it would set itself and my house on fire!
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Hi Ante,
I am paying only about $.10/kWh. Sure it is cheap. It would be a lot cheaper if Canada was smaller because I am subsidizing the people who live hundreds of km from a generating station. Niagara Falls is not far from me.


ONLY! :o  Are you kidding?
Here we have 3 phase 400V for heavy appliance (stove, washing machine or a welder) and 230-240V for everything else this allows thinner wiring and lower losses (but slightly bigger transformers since we have only 50Hz)! ;D

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Hi Ante,
My electricity is cheap because I don't waste it like many people do. A neighbour pays more than 4 times as much as me. Their incandescent lights are on all the time when I have only one to four compact fluorescent lights turned on only when needed. Their air conditioning is on when a nice cool breeze blows through open windows on my house. Their clothes dryer is going when my clothes are drying on the line outside.
Pretty soon my electricity supplier will charge a premium price for electricity that is used at at times of peak demand. I will avoid consumption at those times then I will pay less than now.

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Hi ante..

Thanks for the information about the economical point of view regarding to the wire needed when you have higher voltage which allow thinner wiring compare to low voltage, ..Can you give me mathematical computation with that...what about regarding to transmission losses can you also give me mathematical explanation..
You also mentioned

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