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Is there a big difference between an FM transmitter and an FM receiver?


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I have a stupid little thingy that plugs into the headphone jack of a CD player or similar device. When it's on, it picks up the output and transmits it to the 88.1, 88.5, 88.3 or 88.7 FM band. But it's always staticy! I don't know if it is the circuit of the device or maybe those channels?

I thought if it is easy to modify an FM radio to transmit instead of receive, I would kill to deer with one arrow...

I also like the idea of being able to tune into any frequency on the FM band but I don't know how all this works...

Is this a bad idea???

Thanks!

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I have a stupid little thingy that plugs into the headphone jack of a CD player or similar device. When it's on, it picks up the output and transmits it to the 88.1, 88.5, 88.3 or 88.7 FM band. But it's always staticy!

There are cheap lousy ones and there are very good inexpensive ones. Most have a short range to avoid interference to other radios or so they don't break the law of some countries. They are made to transmit from an MP3 player in a car to the car radio in the same car. How far are you transmitting?

I thought if it is easy to modify an FM radio to transmit instead of receive, I would kill to deer with one arrow...

I nearly killed a deer a few days ago. I was driving and it crossed the road in front of me.
A radio receiver circuit is completely different to a radio transmitter circuit.

I also like the idea of being able to tune into any frequency on the FM band but I don't know how all this works...

They had one that you could tune to any channel, but it drifted its frequency all over the place. The new one has a quartz crystal for no frequency drift and the manufacturer can use 4 frequency choices or 8.

Is this a bad idea???

Maybe your transmitter is bad or is too cheap. Maybe your radio is bad or is too cheap. Maybe you are transmitting too far.
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Well, I usually only use it in my car where it sits right under the radio or in the passenger seat. Some times if its staticy I throw it in the back seat and it has less static, even though the antenna is on the hood... The radio is the original radio in the car, which is 22 years old... So, the radio is pretty old. I just want to play my Ipod through the car speaks. Is there any other way to do this? It doesn't have cassette or CD. I thought about taking the radio out and wiring a headphone plug in parallel with my radio, but I'd rather not do that.

Any other ways?

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A cheap radio overloads when the transmitter's signal is strong because it is nearby. The designer reduced the sensitivity of the radio so that it doesn't overload so much. Then it cannot pickup weak stations that are far away, and it still overloads but not as much.
A good radio is extremely sensitive to pickup weak stations that are far away and has electronic circuitry that reducs overload automatically.

Old car radios were cheap without a cassette player, or costed a little more with a cassette player. They won't have an input jack.

My new car has a good radio with a CD player that plays MP3 recordings. It has a very powerful amplifier and many speakers including a sub-woofer. You should get one.

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