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Found 6 results

  1. Have an awesome project in mind using some LEDs. In that project I will be using some LED Fading Effect and few LED Chaser Circuits. But before jumping onto that, I thought I should create a short tutorial and show you guys how to fade a LED with or without an Arduino automatically or manually using a potentiometer. Video: https://youtu.be/IIUsdICycOw Sponsors This video is sponsored by PCBWay. PCBway: only $5 for 10 pcbs from https://www.pcbway.com/?from=CZcouple PCBWay specialize in manufacturing of very high quality, low-volume, colored PCBs at a very budgetary price. In addition to the standard PCBs, you can also order Advanced PCBs, Aluminum PCBs, FPC/Rigid-flex PCBs. They also provide PCB assembly and other related service which can meet your needs to the greatest extent. The ordering process from PCBWay is very easy. Once I had my design ready, I just had to upload the gerber file to the PCBWay's website and select the type, color and any other customization that I want and then just send it for fabrication. For my project, I choose the black color. PCBWay ships from china to most of the countries of the world within 3 to 7 business days. Talking about the quality, its absolutely mind-blowing. Without Arduino Lets first create the fader circuit without an Arduino. The base of this circuit is an operational amplifier IC named LM358. In this circuit, initially, the LED slowly glows with increasing brightness & after reaching its maximum brightness, the LED slowly dims its brightness and the process continues. Automatic Fading Components Required For the Non-Arduino bit we need: 1 x LM358 IC 1 x BC547 Transistor 1 x 0.47µF Capacitor 2 x 4.7KΩ Resistors 1 x 22KΩ Resistor 1 x 10KΩ Resistor 1 x 4.7MΩ Resistor 1 x 220Ω Resistor 1 x LED and a 9V Battery How This Circuit Works To get the fading effect we need to generate a series of triangular waves. Because of the triangular waves, the LED starts glowing slowly and then slowly dims off and the cycle continues. This setup is done using the LM358 IC. LM358 is a dual operational amplifier (Op-Amp) IC, integrated with two op-amps powered by a common power supply. Pins 1, 2, and 3 are one op-amp channel, and pins 5, 6, and 7 are the 2nd op-amp channel. As the capacitor charges and discharges the state of the PIN 3 switches from high to low and based on that the PIN 2 of the op-amp obtains the desire output. If you want to know more about this IC, please check out my "Tutorial No 21 : DIY - IR Module" : https://youtu.be/_M8FQIPi1qk. So, basically the op-amp here is used for voltage level detection. In this circuit, we are applying a voltage on positive pin (PIN-3) and the voltage to be detected is applied at negative pin (PIN-2). The transistor acts as a signal amplifier. You will need this if you are attaching a cluster of LEDs however for just 1 LED you can simply remove it. The Board So, this is how my board looks like in 2D and 3D. There are 15 breakout-boards in this 100cm x 100cm assembly. Component Assembly Now, lets solder all the components to the board. Lets first solder all the resistances to the board. Then lets solder the transistor followed by the capacitor to the board. After that lets solder the LED and the female pin header. To conclude the setup, lets solder the IC base and then install the IC into it. Demo So, this is how it looks like. Good thing about LEDs is that they can be easily controlled as compared to the traditional light bulbs. Which means you can easily change their intensity based on your need. Just by making a slight modification to this circuit you can change the brightness of a LED Lamp when someone walks in or out of a room. Manual Fading Using PWM Now, if you want to get the same dimming effect but want to manually control the intensity, you will have to find a way to modulate the pulse sent to the LED or group of LEDs using a potentiometer. I am going to do this by generating PWM Signals. What is PWM? Pulse Width Modulation, or PWM, is a technique for getting analog results with digital means. PWM value varies from 0 to 255. The bigger the value of PWM, the brighter the LED is and vice versa. - If PWM = 0, it is same as GND, so the LED will be OFF - If PWM = 255, it is same as VCC, so the LED will be fully ON To get varying analog values, you change, or modulate, that pulse-width. If you repeat this on-off pattern fast enough with an LED, the result is as if the signal is a steady voltage between 0 and 5v controlling the brightness of the LED. In this setup, we are going to use the 555 Timer IC in Astable mode (A free-running multivibrator that has NO stable states but switches continuously between two states this action produces a train of square wave pulses at a fixed known frequency) to generate the PWM Signals. 555 Timer IC will vary the voltage delivered to the LEDs to achieve the Dimming effect of the LED. Components Required For this setup we need: 1 x 555 Timer IC 1 x LED 1 x 220Ω Resistor 2 x 1N4007 Diodes 1 x 50KΩ Potentiometer 1 x 10nF Capacitor 1 x 100nF Capacitor and a 5V Battery How This Circuit Works Based on the charging and discharging timings of the Capacitor, a PWM Signal is generated at PIN 3 (OUT PIN) of the 555 Timer IC. The output is then sent to the LED to produce the dimming effect. Demo So, this is how it looks like. By rotating the knob of the 10K Pot we can adjust the brightness of the connected LED. With Arduino Now, lets repeat these setups using an Arduino. The beauty of Arduino is that it has 6 digital pins that can be used as PWM outputs (3, 5, 6, 9, 10, and 11). PWM signals are sent using the analogWrite() function by passing a value between 0 - 255. - analogWrite(255) requests a 100% duty cycle (always on), - and analogWrite(127) is a 50% duty cycle (on half the time), and so on. Components Required For this setup we need: Arduino UNO/Nano whatever is handy 1 x Breadboard 1 x LED 1 x 220Ω Resistor 1 x 10KΩ Potentiometer Automatic Fading Connect the positive leg of your LED to the digital output PIN9 of your Arduino through a 220Ω resistor. Connect the negative leg directly to the GND. That it, that's how simple it is. The Code After declaring PIN 9 as LedPin, and setting up the pinMode in the setup() section, we are going to loop through and dim the LED in the loop section. By gradually increasing the PWM value from 0 to 255, and then back to 0 we can get the fading effect. In this sketch, the PWM value is set using a variable called 'brightness'. Each time in the loop, it increases by the value of the variable 'fadeAmount'. If brightness is at either extreme of its value (either 0 or 255), then 'fadeAmount' is changed to its negative. So, if the fadeAmount is 5, then it is set to -5 and if it is -5, then it is set to 5. The next time through the loop, this change causes brightness to change its direction. A delay is added to control the speed of the fading effect. Demo So, this is how it looks like. Manual Fading Connect the positive leg of your LED to the digital output PIN6 of your Arduino through a 220Ω resistor. Connect the negative leg directly to the GND. Connect the left (or right) pin of the 50KΩ PoT to VCC and then connect the right (or left) pin of the PoT to the GND. Now, connect the 'data' pin of your potentiometer to the Analog PIN 'A0' of the Arduino. In this circuit, the potentiometer is working as a voltage divider. One of the outer pins is connected to the GND, the other to Vcc and the middle pin is the voltage output. The wiper position in this setup determines the output voltage. Now, lets have a look at the code. The Code Based on my setup, I set the LedPin as 6 and Potentiometer pin Pot as A0. Another variable 'Knob' is used to read and store the value of the potentiometer. pinMode of the LedPin is set to OUTPUT and we don't need to do anything for the PoT as its default value is already set as input. In the 'loop()' section I am first reading the value of the PoT using the 'analogRead()' function and then mapping its value between 1 to 255. A potentiometer intakes a value between 1 and 1024, but in our setup it has to be between 1 to 255. The 'map()' function divides the value read from the potentiometer into equal intervals of 1/255, which is then sent to the LED using the 'analogWrite()' function. Demo So, this is how it looks like. Thanks Thanks again for checking my post. I hope it helps you. If you want to support me subscribe to my YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/tarantula3 Full Blog Post: https://diy-projects4u.blogspot.com/2021/02/led-fader-with-or-without-arduino.html Video: https://youtu.be/IIUsdICycOw Gerber File: 1. Gerber : https://drive.google.com/file/d/1w1hHZBFsXQR74ZTn04097awaAUqMndJi/view?usp=sharing The Code: 1. Automatic Fading : https://drive.google.com/file/d/1hab3sISIlurrPQBat80OLb90RXqQKzLZ/view?usp=sharing 2. Manual Fading Using PoT : https://drive.google.com/file/d/1TzXdVO5lVjPNaw_NPSUexIye3WZGJ6cj/view?usp=sharing Sketches: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1_WtmESof7kSyuJ_cmkkFZ8E8mdQXl3Z9/view?usp=sharing BTC: 1M1PdxVxSTPLoMK91XnvEPksVuAa4J4dDp LTC: MQFkVkWimYngMwp5SMuSbMP4ADStjysstm DOGE: DDe7Fws24zf7acZevoT8uERnmisiHwR5st ETH: 0x939aa4e13ecb4b46663c8017986abc0d204cde60 BAT: 0x939aa4e13ecb4b46663c8017986abc0d204cde60 LBC: bZ8ANEJFsd2MNFfpoxBhtFNPboh7PmD7M2 Thanks, ca again in my next tutorial.
  2. A Chaser Circuit consists of a clocked IC or other electronic unit like an Arduino that drives an array of LEDs in such a way that individual LEDs (or small groups of LEDs) turn on and off in a predetermined and repeating sequence, thus producing a visually attractive display in which one or more ripples of light seem to repeatedly run through a chain or around a ring of LEDs. In this tutorial I am going to create 3 chaser circuits using Arduino and IC4017 decade counter. https://youtu.be/F6V1AjESWbU Sponsors This video is sponsored by PCBWay. PCBway: only $5 for 10 pcbs from https://www.pcbway.com/ PCBWay specialize in manufacturing of very high quality, low-volume, colored PCBs at a very budgetary price. In addition to the standard PCBs, you can also order Advanced PCBs, Aluminum PCBs, FPC/Rigid-flex PCBs. They also provide PCB assembly and other related service which can meet your needs to the greatest extent. The ordering process from PCBWay is very easy. Once I had my design ready, I just had to upload the gerber file to the PCBWay's website and select the type, color and any other customization that I want and then just send it for fabrication. For my project, I choose the black color. PCBWay ships from china to most of the countries of the world within 3 to 7 business days. Talking about the quality, its absolutely mind-blowing. Using IC555 and IC4017 Lets first create the chaser circuit using the IC4017 decade counter and IC555 timer IC. Components Required For the Non-Arduino bit we need: 2 x 4017 Decade Counter IC 1 x 555 Timer IC 1 x 10 K Potentiometer 1 x 1 Kilo Ohm Resistor 1 x 100 Ohm Resistor 1 x 100 MFD Capacitor 20 x Zener Diodes and 10 x Red LEDs Circuit Diagram 1. Forward Chaser The circuit is very simple. The 555 Timer IC operates as a clock oscillator or clock generator. The output on PIN-3 goes high causing a shift. The signal from the 555 IC clocks the 4017 decade counter. Output of 555 timer IC on PIN-3 is given as an input to 4017 IC through PIN-14. Whenever a pulse is received at the input of IC 4017, the counter increments the count and activates the corresponding output PIN. This IC can count upto 10, so we have attached 10 LEDs to the circuit. By increasing or decreasing the value of resistance of the 10K pot we can adjust the speed of the chaser circuit. Since only one LED will be turned on at a given time, I have attached just one 220ohm current limiting resistor to the cluster of LEDs. Demo: So this is how it looks like. 2. Forward Reverse Chaser using 2 x IC4017 Now, to give the forward and reverse effect we are attaching another 4017 IC to this circuit. If lets say the 1st IC connects from 1 to 10 (left to right) then the second one should connect from 10 to 1 (right to left). However, now we cannot connect the counter ICs directly to the LEDs as we did before. We have to use Diodes to stop the reverse flow of current to the 2nd IC. We have also lowered the value of the current limiting resistor to 100ohms as at a given time 2 LEDs will be on, one running from left and one from the right hand side. Demo: Now lets do a quick test. By lowering the speed I can get the desired forward and reverse effect. By removing one of the 4017 ICs we can get the effect that I demonstrated in the previous example. 3. Forward Reverse Chaser using 1 x IC4017 To get a forward reverse effect using one 4017 IC we need to connect 8 diodes to the circuit. The 1st and the 6th LED will be directly connected to the IC4017. The LEDs at the far end will get signals from only one pin however the one in the middle will receive signals from 2 x pins and hence we need diodes to stop the reverse flow of the current. Demo: So this is how it looks like. Using Arduino Now, I am going to repeat the same setup using an Arduino. Components Required For the Arduino bit we need: 1 x Arduino Uno/Nano (whatever is handy) 1 x 220 Ohm Resistor 10 x Red LEDs Few Connecting Cables The beauty of using an Arduino is that the setup remains the same for all the previously shown circuits, the only thing that changes is the code. So, I am going to use this simple setup for the rest of the tutorial. Circuit Diagram 1. Forward Chaser Code: The code for the forward chaser is very simple. Start by defining the constants and the global variables that will be used throughout the code. Then in the setup section define the pin modes. Now, in the loop section we are going to start by turning off all the LEDs followed by turning one LED on at a time. A counter is used to tell the loop which LED to turn on in the next cycle. Once the value of the counter reaches 10 (the maximum number of LEDs) the counter resets to 1 and the 1st LED lights up and the cycle continues. Demo: So this is how it looks like. 2. Forward Reverse Chaser Code: The code is same as the previous setup. The only thing that changes is the function that deals with the LEDs. In this setup we cycle through LED 1 to LED 10 and then reverse from LED 9 to LED 1. The counter resets when the max count is reached. Demo: So this is how it looks like. 3. Left-Right Chaser Code: The setup is exactly the same as the previous two setups. This function is the one which turns on the LEDs at the two far ends and then the one before that and likewise until they cross each other. The counter is reset when the max count is reached. Demo: So this is how it looks like. PCF8574 8-bit GPIO Port Extender Using a PCF8574 8-bit GPIO Port Extender we can add even more LEDs to this setup. PCF8574 becomes a life saver when you run out of pins on your Arduino. This "GPIO (General Purpose Input Output) pin extender" provides an additional 8 pins (P0 ~ P7) which can be used to 'output a signal' or 'read a signal as an input'. These modules run on the I2C bus, and if daisy-chained you can connect upto 8 of these devices in a project. Each device will give us an additional 8-bits of GPIO enabling 64 GPIOs in total. To know more about this IC please check out my tutorial number 10 : "PCF8574 GPIO Extender - With Arduino and NodeMCU". Thanks Full Blog Post: https://diy-projects4u.blogspot.com/2021/01/led-chaser-circuits-using-ic4017-and.html Video: https://youtu.be/F6V1AjESWbU Gerber File: 1. https://drive.google.com/file/d/108EUNylmearJgU_4qSlxNr9GAPGrLGRh/view?usp=sharing Code: 1. Forward: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1bw1la5oRMWZRXsfYJ41qNbCoEkJsZHBM/view?usp=sharing 2. Forward Reverse: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Oag8kxbvfxZg7StFrYzWwtcqQx6okwzd/view?usp=sharing 3. Left Right: https://drive.google.com/file/d/17ZEsKU3OFrcjaJpvyUJMQbHQ-lznbp0H/view?usp=sharing Sketch: 1. With Arduino: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1YHWvpkDbGbGVHwX65HwvwS3_JyFwZdK9/view?usp=sharing 2. Without Arduino: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1LdxcS1BXf3GtQTRhWCoCZKm6ppRwsc5k/view?usp=sharing BTC: 1M1PdxVxSTPLoMK91XnvEPksVuAa4J4dDp DOGE: DDe7Fws24zf7acZevoT8uERnmisiHwR5st LTC: LedWPdTaUzr5iaJx8garkcykSs1DZU1FAx ETH: 0xB62a901Ee6cE24f3153CA6ae565C2A6533066faA BAT: 0xB62a901Ee6cE24f3153CA6ae565C2A6533066faA BCH: 14xJhpswSAQi375S39yDFsrBFtDoiLVX1J
  3. Trying to explain dialup to a pre-teen will evoke the same wild-eyed bewilderment as “a dinosaur was as-big-as this house”. We can’t go off what our parents did because two tin cans connected by a string isn’t really the same these days and probably it would look like a piece of junk for the new and upcoming generations. However, the truth is "life is busy" and hence we don’t spend enough time with our children. Children need high-quality time with parents and caregivers - the QUALITY of time spent with them is much more important than the QUANTITY of time. Christmas was the perfect time to explore and setup this bonding. With a bit of help from my little monster and by using The Most Complete Starter Kit from ELEGOO I created this small Christmas Village for my little monster. https://youtu.be/j9d58jL1THU Components Used [Village Creation] ----------------------------------------------- To create the cardboard village we need: Cardboard Sheets A4 Paper Permanent Marker or Pen Scissor and a Knife Hot Glue Gun or Wood Glue Adding a bit color would have made my project even more attractive however I just left it all in white. Paper Templates --------------------- I created 2 x PDF files with all the measurements in it. The links to the PDF files is in the description below. After printing the PDFs on A4 sheet, I extracted the shapes from it using a paper cutting scissor. Cutting The Cardboard ------------------------------- Then I traced the paper-cutouts on pieces of cardboard and using both scissor and knife I extracted all the pieces of cardboard that I need for this project. Using a hot-glue gun I joined all the cardboard cutouts. Be very careful while using a hot-glue gun. Use gloves as much as possible to avoid the hot glue from burning your hand and fingers. By using wood-glue instead of hot-glue you can get a cleaner and stronger finish, but hot glue is faster. Hot glue can also be more forgiving as you can re-heat and re-glue if you're unsatisfied with your seam. Try applying the glue from the inner side as much as possible to leave the outer side neat and clean. Meaningful connections are all about quality of time and not quantity of time. Keep it simple and connect with your child in ways that make sense for your lifestyle and relationship. Each connection has a lasting impact and provides the support and reassurance that your child needs. Although the days with little kids often seem long; however, the years fly-by. Use this practical and purposeful blueprint to enjoy the moments you have together. Color or Not To Color ---------------------------- So, this is how it looks like. As advised earlier, adding a bit color would have made my project even more attractive however I just left it all in white. I created this wooden frame on which the village will sit. This frame will also house the electronic components inside it. Components Used [Electronics] ---------------------------------------- Now for the Electronics bit we need the "The Most Complete Starter Kit from ELEGOO". This kit has all the components that are required for this project. 1 x ELEGOO UNO R3 9 x Blue LEDs 9 x White LEDs 5 x Yellow LEDs 1 x RGB LED 3 x 220 Ohm Resistor 1 x Stepper Motor 1 x Stepper Motor Driver 1 x LDR Adding LEDs ----------------- Using the soldering iron I made few holes around the pathway. These holes are for the Blue and White LEDs which will blink alternately. Adding RGB-LEDs would have definitely given this a better look and feel. Next, I added a RGB-LED to the water-feature. Later, I will add a bit of cotton on top of this which may look like flowing water. SUN & MOON ------------------- So, this is how the final setup looks like. I added some hills at the back for the rising and setting of the sun and the moon. The logic is very simple. A DC-Motor or Stepper-Motor rotates the Half Sun and Half Moon. A LDR is placed in a way that the Sun rays can cover it up. When the moon side is up the sun rays cove the LDR and vice-versa. This LDR acts as a switch and turns on and off the blue and white flashing LEDs. With the same logic you can go even more creative than what I did. Coding --------- The DC Motor run off the 5V pin of the Arduino so we don't need to code anything for that. For the rest of the code I am looping through and flashing the RGB LEDs followed by checking if the LDR has detected any light and then waiting for 200ms before repeating the process again. Thanks ---------- Thanks again for checking my post. I hope it helps you. If you want to support me subscribe to my YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/tarantula3 Full Blog Post: https://diyfactory007.blogspot.com/2021/01/arduino-christmas-village.html Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j9d58jL1THU Code: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1RABIcytmGJo3m6ghkzk8KYoQmRycmBku/view?usp=sharing Cardboard Templates: Christmas Tree : https://drive.google.com/file/d/13NqyTz0WU1Q8qshmeGsMqV9j_K5hU0AN/view?usp=sharing Houses : https://drive.google.com/file/d/15hzvw0cuT9-XM3dqoUrUwIffBj5fQWff/view?usp=sharing Train : https://drive.google.com/file/d/1aGcprGGrlxslU2F8XmnmUZ1KYQZVORJ1/view?usp=sharing BTC: 35ciN1Z49Y1bReX2U7Etd9hGPWzzzk8TzF DOGE: DDe7Fws24zf7acZevoT8uERnmisiHwR5st LTC: MQFkVkWimYngMwp5SMuSbMP4ADStjysstm ETH: 0x939aa4e13ecb4b46663c8017986abc0d204cde60 BAT: 0x939aa4e13ecb4b46663c8017986abc0d204cde60 Thanks, ca again in my next tutorial.
  4. 788bs Led Matrix Pinout There are several types of led matrix displays available in the market. We can understand it in size and types, e.g. 5x7, 8x8, common anode, and common cathode type. But in this article, I will discuss 788bs as a common anode 8x8 red color matrix Modules. We use it in many electronics displaying items, e.g. electronics clocks. also for moving message displays, displaying games, etc. We use dot matrix display with an Arduino UNO board directly, sometimes in projects. But for some projects, we use a max7219 chip or 74hc595 for dot matrix driver as required in our projects. 8x8 dot Matrix Pinout details The dot-matrix modules most of the time comes in red color. It is very easy to attach with an Arduino board as compared to RGB led. If we look at a piece of the 8x8 dot matrix, it contains 16 pins in which 8 pins used for rows and 8 for columns out of 64 Led. We start from Pin # 1 to pin # 8. Pin number 1 is R5 (Row-5) and Pin number 8 is R3 (Row-3) at the downside. At the upper side From Pin 9 (Row-1) to Pin 16 (column-1) located. But a newbie always confuses and starts from zero, because we know the picture/diagram. often we get from some source, also we have to sort out which one +VE and -VE. might be an expert can understand from common cathode/anode type. But my concern about the person has a basic knowledge of electronics. Who try to make their own initial display projects like a clock or some more. Ok, let’s start if we have an 8x8 dot matrix and how do we know where pin 1 is? As in IC Chips near Pin 1, a dot mentioned at IC/Microcontroller Chip. But here, how do we know? At the led dot matrix, the manufacturer writes the tag or mark at pin 1 side, as shown in the figure. We can find it. And also a curve mentioned at pin number 1 side. Row = + Positive Supply Column = - Negative Supply The testing power supply should be 1.5V DC required. it means only one battery cell enough or uses one 130 ohm resistance in series at a positive/negative side. After that attached led to the power supply. We found that the 8th column and 5th rows led become ON as Connection shown in the figure. How to connect the battery cell with a matrix display. Pin Test of led dot matrix As shown in fig pin # 1 and pin # 16 got Energize and 8th Column and 5th-row led become ON. We should verify the Dot-matrix before using because if any led blows we can change. Programming with Arduino UNO To run the 788bs, you need to check it with Arduino UNO. What material you need to perform a complete test. Arduino UNO Amazon Breadboard Amazon / Banggood 788BS 8x8 matrix Amazon / Banggood Battery (1.5V) only one Jumper wires The dot matrix display often used with the shift register 74HC595 led driver or max7219. most common in electronic Circuits, we operate it with a Microcontroller or Arduino platform, and even with Raspberry Pi. But in this circuit, you can test the matrix direct with an Arduino UNO board. Interface dot matrix with Arduino First setting up the matrix circuit, as per the connection given in the picture diagram. start the Arduino IDE to program the Arduino UNO board. Arduino IDE is available at Arduino official site. For this circuit, it does not need resistance at all. Just connect wires as per given instruction. here you need two steps before starting a matrix connection with Arduino. as per the 788bs datasheet, matrix pins connection given. 1- 8x8 led matrix code generator This will help to generate code for your matrix. Just draw anything for the matrix, copy the code, and use it in your program. You can draw different symbols, shapes, or words. 2- Add matrix library with Arduino Ide First, add the 8x8 led dot matrix library in Arduino Ide. After that, the library manager in Arduino Ide will run the code. It will display in the matrix. Connection Diagram 788bs matrix and Arduino UNO Matrix Rows Pins # ------------ Arduino Uno Pins # Pin # 1 ---------- 2 2 ---------- 3 3 ---------- 4 4 ---------- 5 5 ---------- 6 6 ---------- 7 7 ---------- 8 8 ---------- 9 Matrix Column: Pins # ----------------- Arduino Uno Pins # Pin # 1 -------------10 2 ------------- 11 3 ------------- 12 4 ------------- 13 5 ------------- A1 6 ------------- A2 7 ------------- A3 8 ------------- A4
  5. This project is the second one in the new IOT project series on Ameba RTL8195AM Dev. Board. The focus of this project is to demonstrates how easy it is for Ameba Wi-Fi Dev. board to communicate with our smart phone via MQTT protocol. Phone to microcontroller communication used to be very difficult as they use totally different hardware interface and phone get its data mainly through the network. Now with a Wi-Fi enabled microcontroller like Ameba RTL8195AM, communication with our phone becomes a bliss. Of course, in this project, only a mini hand-crafted window is used for demonstration purpose but controlling a real window should not be a problem if you simply replace the servo motor with a bigger DC step motor and change the source code accordingly. With this smart curtain system, you may, 1. Remotely control your curtain to open or close instantaneously 2. Check your curtain status according to the MQTT message received 3. Link with the previous weather station project and automate your room from there Hardware List of hardware needed Ameba 1 RTL8195AM x1 Servo motor x1 Jumper wires x3 DIY materials x3 Hardware connection is shown below, for the window, you may use a Lego house as substitute or simply build one using plywood or hard form board, the exact structure can also be found in this folder. Software 1. Check and make sure you have installed the ameba 1 board to Arduino IDE via adding this link into “additional boards manager URLs” under “Preference”, and install it in “board manager” under “Tools”, https://github.com/ambiot/amb1_arduino/raw/master/Arduino_package/package_realtek.com_ameba1_index.json 2. Upload source code to your Ameba1 RTL8195 board using arduino IDE 3. Install a MQTT client App on your smart device (android/iOS) a) To use a MQTT service, you must first get a free MQTT server address b) Go to www.amebaiot.com and register for a user c) Then go to cloud service tab and register your device d) Once approved, the same username and password used for registration can be used to make use of the MQTT service for free 4. Connect to your MQTT server by keying in the correct server address, port number, username and password • For Host name: cloud.amebaiot.com • For Port number: 1883 • For username: same as your amebaiot.com username • For password: same as your amebaiot.com password 5. Key in the topics that you specified in the code, always remember to swap the publish topic and subscribe topic when you want to monitor your microcontroller’s published data.
  6. I am looking for any missing parameters …. all comments are welcome !
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