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Inverter Circuit 12V DC to 230VAC Sine Wave


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The project of the 500W square wave inverter is here: http://www.electronics-lab.com/projects/power/033/index.html and is updated with a circuit that works.

You could make a pure sine wave inverter with a high current linear amplifier driving a transformer and waste a lot of battery power as heat, or you could make a complicated pulse-width-modulation (class-D) circuit drive a transformer with variable width pulses and waste less power. I have never seen a circuit because a pure sine wave is rarely needed.

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Hi Harry,
The modified 500W inverter is simply a CD4047 Cmos oscillator/divider/opposing outputs IC driving LM358 dual opamp buffers to increase its output currents. Each buffer drives sets of transistors connected in a darlington arrangement and the output transistors are paralleled for very high current. The transistors apply their high current swings to a center-tapped transformer that steps-up the voltage.

I haven't seen the schematic for a modified sine wave inverter. I heard that their output is a square wave with a step in it. I don't know how they make the step without overheating.
Maybe the transformer has a tap on its low-voltage winding and a separate output transistor drives the tap on each side to make the step.
Actually, a separate transistor would drive the full winding to make the step, and another transistor would drive the tap for full output on each side. ;D

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Hi Audioguru,

Yes, this is closer to the sine wave than the square wave but not perfect though. I am sure that some equipment will be more forgiving to this waveform than to square wave. But obviously the circuit becomes more complex which is hereby proven by the fact that you had to look twice to see how it works! ;D ;D

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The project of the 500W square wave inverter is here: http://www.electronics-lab.com/projects/power/033/index.html and is updated with a circuit that works.

You could make a pure sine wave inverter with a high current linear amplifier driving a transformer and waste a lot of battery power as heat, or you could make a complicated pulse-width-modulation (class-D) circuit drive a transformer with variable width pulses and waste less power. I have never seen a circuit because a pure sine wave is rarely needed.


That thread is actually a re-make of the project and not a correction. There were not many problems in it. Some traces were connected where they should not be and the decimals were off in the clock components. Either way, you have a square wave. Using a linear amp for a sine wave will waste too much energy. If you live in the arctic, it could certainly be beneficial as a heater.

Here is a schematic from a link ante sent me some time ago. This might be what you are looking for.

MP

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Another form of sinewave conversion and a much more effective way to do this is to use a micro to generate varying levels of square waves which are very close together in timing and which, when smoothed with a capacitor, will become a sine wave. This will give you the efficiency of a square wave inverter, but a sinewave output. See the drawing below. It is not a very good one but gives you an idea. You would need many more waves than in this depiction to get a smooth sine wave.
Hope this helps.

MP

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actually class D is a far cry from being digital. It is PWM. Class D uses triangle wave controlled by input signal (sine) to produce a PWM type of controlling signal. I was referring to a constant clocked squarewave controlled by a sinewave to produce varying heights of squarewaves, which when smoothed, creates a representative sinewave. Class D produces all the same height PWM waves. This is less useable as an inverter type circuit.  ;D

MP

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Actually, since the digital PWM waves of a class-D amplifier all have the same height, and are also constantly clocked, there is far less heating than in your proposed "vaying heights" plan. Most fairly high power class-D amplifiers are surface-mount, and don't even need a heatsink.
Class-D amps are perfect for a sine-wave inverter. ;D

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