PolarBerry – A secure PolarFire SoC (FPGA + RISC-V) Linux-capable SBC and SoM

PolarBerry – A secure PolarFire SoC (FPGA + RISC-V) Linux-capable SBC and SoM

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PolarBerry is a System on Module (SoM) SBC utilizing the Microsemi PolarFire SoC, which integrates a low-power FPGA with a highly-secure, four-application-core, 64-bit RISC-V subsystem that is Linux-capable.

Application Flexibility

PolarBerry is designed to be application-flexible, while also being quick to use and deploy. Its combination of features make it perfect for applications that require high-performance but a low power draw, defense-level security, a real-time, deterministic RISC-V processor that’s capable of Linux, a small physical profile, immediate connectivity, or custom extensibility – such as those in the autonomous vehicle or defense industries.

FPGA, RISC-V, and Linux

PolarBerry with its PolarFire SoC provides a system with hardcore, deterministic, coherent RISC-V processing and programmable logic – enabling real-time systems and Linux with unparalleled security features.

SBC and SoM Form-factor

As the board is essentially an SBC in a SoM form-factor, it can be utilized as a standalone module or along with a carrier board like the Sundance DSP SE215 carrier or one of your own designs.

A Raspberry Pi connector, two CAN bus interfaces, and an RJ45 port for Ethernet allows PolarBerry to tap into extensive ecosystems, and its Samtec connectors provide high-speed communication to a carrier board for powerful peripheral customization.

For example, PolarBerry works well with our SE215 PCIe SoM carrier board which provides access to an FMC and additional interfaces like an SFP+ module.

Specifications

  • SoC: Microsemi PolarFire FPGA MPFS250T-FCVG484
    • 5 x RISC-V cores in a deterministic, coherent cluster
      • 1 x RV64IMAC monitor core
      • 4 x RV64GC application cores
    • 254K x logic elements (4LUT + DFF)
    • 784 x math blocks (18 x 18 MACC)
    • 16 x SERDES lanes at 12.5 Gbps
    • 12 W maximum power consumption
    • Built-in oscillator for configuration, etc.
  • Security:
    • DPA-resistant bitstream programming
    • DPA-resistant secure boot
    • Anti-tamper
    • DPA-resistant crypto-coprocessor
    • CRI DPA countermeasures pass-through license
  • Memory: Micron MT40A1G16WBU-083E:B
    • 4 GB of 32-bit wide DDR4 memory
  • Storage:
    • 128 Mb SPI Serial NOR flash for storing boot image
    • 4 Gb eMMC for general use
  • Clock Sources:
    • 1 x 25 MHz XO with ±10 ppm stability over temperature, as reference
    • 4 x Silicon Labs SI5338A programmable clock sources, providing flexible clocking to FPGA and high-speed transceivers
  • Transceivers:
    • 4 x high-speed, low-power transceivers from 250 Mbps – 12.7 Gbps
  • Expansion Interfaces:
    • High-speed IO: 3 x high-speed Samtec connectors
      • Bank 1 IO from FPGA including ULPI
      • JTAG
      • SPI interface from FPGA
      • 100/1000BASE-T interface
    • Raspbery Pi connector: 40-pin (2 x 20) male headers with standard .1″ (2.54 mm) pitch
      • 1 x I²C from MSS part
      • 1 x UART from MSS part
      • 20 x GPIOs from PL part(can be assigned to SPI, UART, CAN or another interface from MSS)
      • 6 x GPIOs from MSS part
      • All RPI signals are 3.3 V logic
    • CAN: 6-pin (1 x 6) male headers with standard .1″ (2.54 mm) pitch
      • 2 x CAN 2.0 PHY
    • Ethernet: RJ45 connector
      • 100/1000BASE-T
  • Power: Intel EN63A0QA
    • Operates on 5 or 3.3 V input
    • Maximum power consumption of module is 16 W
  • Dimensions: 55 x 85 mm
  • Temperature range: -20°C to +65°C

The project will soon lauch on CrowdSupply.com, get more details here: https://www.crowdsupply.com/sundance-dsp/polarberry

Mike is the founder and editor of Electronics-Lab.com, an electronics engineering community/news and project sharing platform. He studied Electronics and Physics and enjoys everything that has moving electrons and fun. His interests lying on solar cells, microcontrollers and switchmode power supplies. Feel free to reach him for feedback, random tips or just to say hello :-)

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