LED driver IC BCR431U gives more freedom in designing low current LED strips

LED driver IC BCR431U gives more freedom in designing low current LED strips

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Infineon Technologies AG  releases the BCR431U. The constant current linear LED driver IC provides low-voltage drop performance for regulating LED current. It is the second device released in the new generation BCR family with low voltage drop focusing on low current designs of up to 37 mA. Typical applications for the new BCR431U include LED strips, channel letters, architectural LED lighting, LED displays, as well as emergency, retail, and appliance lighting.

The voltage drop at the integrated driver IC can go down to 105 mV at 15 mA. This is unmatched in the industry and provides far more flexibility in lighting applications. It improves the overall efficiency and provides the voltage headroom required to compensate for the LED forward voltage tolerances and variances in the supply voltage. The BRCU431U allows either to add additional LEDs to lighting designs, for example, seven instead of six LEDs in series driven by one IC. Or it can be used to increase the overall length of a LED strip design from, for example, 5 to 7 m. Overall, longer LED strips mean fewer feeding points and less efforts in installation.

The LED current is easily adjustable via a high ohmic resistor on a dedicated pin with an IC supply voltage ranging between 6 V and 42 V. For safe and reliable operation and to extend the overall LED system’s lifetime, a smart over-temperature controlling circuit keeps the current constant even at rising temperature. At the same time, it reduces the LED current only when the junction temperature gets very high. The BCR431U features a dimming capability of down to 1 percent, which makes it attractive for a great variety of LED strip designs.

Availability

The BCR431U can be ordered now in a SOT-23-6 package. In addition, a demo board is available. More information is available at www.infineon.com/bcr431u.

Mike is the founder and editor of Electronics-Lab.com, an electronics engineering community/news and project sharing platform. He studied Electronics and Physics and enjoys everything that has moving electrons and fun. His interests lying on solar cells, microcontrollers and switchmode power supplies. Feel free to reach him for feedback, random tips or just to say hello :-)

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