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13 Jul 2014

11bgas

by Henrik’s Blog @ hforsten.com:

All of the best integrated circuits today come in hard to solder BGA packages. Because BGA packages have connections under the chip soldering is harder and it needs to be done using a reflow oven or hot plate. Another problem is with designing the PCB, vias and traces need to be small enough to fit between the solder balls and there needs to be usually quite many layers in the board to make room for all the closely packed traces. This means that a cheap Chinese two layer board doesn’t have enough room and more layers are needed. Adding layers increases the cost of the board dramatically when ordering only a few copies.

Making embedded Linux computer - [Link]

29 Jun 2014

Internal-32MHz-RC-oscillator-without-PLL-1

by Shawon Shahryiar @ embedded-lab.com:

Okay firstly the reason I wrote about the clock system instead of I/O ports or something else in this second post of the XMega series is simply because of the fact that without understanding clock configurations you won’t get what you want from your chip. Since XMega’s clock system is software-level configurable and complex at first, it makes itself the first priority module before anything else.

XMega Clock System - [Link]

9 Jun 2014

blend

Blend Micro is an Arduino development board with built-in Bluetooth 4.0 Low Energy (aka BLE or Bluetooth Smart) connectivity targeted at developers using the Arduino platform to design IoT applications. The board uses an Atmel ATmega32u4 micro-controller and the Nordic nRF8001 BLE chip.

The Blend Micro runs in the BLE peripheral role only, allowing BLE central role devices to establish communication.

Blend Bluetooth with an Arduino Platform - [Link]

6 Jun 2014

3D_PCB_SMD_first

This project is a USB to Serial converter using an ATMEL AVR microcontroller. There are two version of the converter, one with SMD parts and another with TH parts. The mcu used is an ATmega8 and USB communication is done using software on AVR mcu. It’s based on the software USB implementation of AVR-CDC. Firmware can be downloaded from the download section of CDC-RS232.

USB to Serial Converter using AVR microcontroller - [Link]


31 May 2014

cdc232-t45

CDC-232 creates a virtual COM port on PC that doesn’t have real RS- 232C port. It enables RS-232C communication (without control lines), after connecting the device and installing the driver.

Write the program to AVR, build the circuit, and connect the device to PC’s USB port. Install the driver on Windows. Access the device through generated virtual COM port from terminal software or your application. Control lines (DTR, DTS, RTS, CTS) are not used by the host application. Set the terminal software as “no flow-control”.

Windows requests the driver installation again when connected to other USB port. Detect the previously installed driver automatically. Another COM number will be assigned. If you set serial number in AVR (rebuild with modified usbconfig.h), you can get the same COM port at any USB port. However, you cannot connect multiple CDC devices of the same serial number.

Before detaching the device, close the COM port in terminal software or in your application. Otherwise, you cannot connect to the device again because of the broken file handle. Restart the terminal software or your application then. Switch to the fast transfer mode using “lowcdc.vbs” to get the baudrate higher than 9600bps.

CDC-232 – Virtual COM on ATMEL AVR - [Link]

16 May 2014

zero

A new development board has been released from the Arduino – Arduino Zero:

A new development board has been released from the Arduino stable of development products. This board has been developed jointly by Atmel and Arduino and targets ‘The next generation of IoT development’.

The Zero board contains an Atmel SAMD21 microcontroller, built around the 32-bit ARM Cortex M0+ processor. The board also packs 256 KB of flash and 32 KB of SRAM. Shield connectors are Arduino R3 compatible at 3.3 V. The (EDBG) Atmel embedded software debugger is available to aid program development.

Acording to Massimo Banzi, co-founder and CEO at Arduino “The Zero board expands the Arduino family by providing increased performance to fuel creativity of the Maker community. The flexible feature set enables endless project opportunities for devices and acts as a great educational tool for learning about 32-bit application development”.

Arduino Zero Targets the IoT - [Link]

8 May 2014

oswatch-2

This watch, by Jonathan Cook, recently won MAKE’s Arduino Challenge, as posted on Bits and Pieces from the Embedded Design World. [via]

The watch is the latest iteration of an ongoing BLE watch endeavor Cook has been exploring for the past nine months. In addition to time and date functionality, he’s building interfacing that any smartwatch wearer would want — email, Facebook notification, Twitter updates, etc., and hopes to have the community further the platform as well.

Atmel-based smartwatch wins Make challenge - [Link]

30 Apr 2014

ypod_board

by mictronics.de:

This page is related to the yamppPod (yPod) MP3 player project of Jesper Hansen at www.yampp.com  The hardware of this player is based around an Atmel ARM7, here AT90SAM7S128 and the VLSI VS1033 MPEG3 codec. Powered by a single LiIo/LiPo battery, the player also includes a color LCD, a 5-way switch for user inputs and a TWI EEPROM to store settings. A Micro SD card slot provides access to the music and system files stored a simple Micro SD card. Recharging the battery as well as data exchange with a PC is done by the USB interface available via mini-USB connector. A 3.5mm stereo jack provides the audio signal for headphones or any kind of amplifier. And everything located on a tiny 4-layer PCB.

yamppPod MP3 Player - [Link]

25 Apr 2014

Final-Key-Hardware-Password-Manager

The final key – Hardware password manager by cyberstalker.dk

The Final Key is a piece technology that solves a problem. The Final Key is a hardware password manager with encryption and focus on combining portability, compatibility security and easy of use. It is a hobbyproject of mine and not under any commercial distribution, you are also free to build your own clones if you like the idea. The Final Key is based around a 16 MHz Atmel ATmega3U4 microprocessor and 64 KiB of EEPROM for storage. You connect to The Final Key using any serial terminal, and “triggers” the account you want to log into. Then you can focus the username/password field of the website/application you want to log into, and then you press the button and The Final Key acts as a keyboard and types your credentials directly into the receiving application.

[via]

The final key – Hardware password manager - [Link]

20 Apr 2014

FRII89LHOHYDNQ9.MEDIUM

Here is how to make your own usbtinyisp

DIY $5 USBTinyISP - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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