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14 Apr 2014

w2aew @ youtube.com writes:

A tutorial on the basics of an inverting and non-inverting summing amplifier using an op amp. The video assumes a basic knowledge of how inverting and non-inverting amplifiers using op amps work. If you are unfamiliar with this, I’d recommend viewing my video on how to easily understand the operation of most opamp circuits: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K03Rom3Cs28

Basics of an Op Amp Summing Amplifier - [Link]

8 Apr 2014

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A beginner’s guide to AVR programming on instructables. It cover the basic setup to light up some leds.

Beginner’s Guide – AVR Programming - [Link]

6 Apr 2014

This video reviews the two most common reasons why the output amplitude setting on a function or signal generator doesn’t match what is read on an oscilloscope. This can be due to an incorrect attenuation setting on the scope, but is most commonly due to the fact that the generator is not presented with the load impedance that it is expecting. To correct this most common case, you can either use the correct load impedance, or tell the generator what load you are presenting it with.

Why your Function Generator’s output voltage reading can be wrong - [Link]

 

6 Apr 2014

In this tutorial Dave explains what Operational Amplifiers (OpAmps) are and how they work. The concepts of negative feedback, open loop gain, virtual grounds and opamp action. The comparator, the buffer, the inverting and non-inverting amplifiers, the differential amplifier, and the integrator circuit configurations are also explained. Then a practical breadboard circuit to demonstrate a virtual ground and the effect of voltage rail limitations.

EEVblog #600 – OpAmps Explained - [Link]


31 Mar 2014

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This project was originally released on www.robives.com

Resistors use coloured bands to show their value. There are usually four bands, the first two code for the first two digits of the resistors value, the third is the multiplier, basically the number of zeroes on the end of the number. The final band shows the tolerance of the resistor, how accurate it is.

This color wheel helps you decode the bands on standard resistor so you can see what value they are .

Resistor Color Wheel - [Link]

23 Mar 2014

This tutorial video gives the basics of the typical amplitude units used on a spectrum analyzer. It gives a basic description of the electronic definition of the decibel (dB), some of the properties of the dB, why it is used. It describes that the dB is a relative measurement. These relative measurements can be expressed as absolute measurements when a known reference is used/implied. This is where the terms dBm, dBu, dBmv, etc. come from. Finally, the term dBc is described. Each of the descriptions is followed with practical examples and demonstrations on an oscilloscope and spectrum analyzer.

What is a dB, dBm, dBu, dBc, etc. on a Spectrum Analyzer? - [Link]

23 Mar 2014

Flasher

Kerry Wong writes:

Transistors operating in their avalanche regions are often used to generate fast rise pulses (see avalanche pulse generator using 2N3904). Many transistors can also avalanche when the connections to collector and emitter are reversed. When operating in reverse avalanche region, these transistors are sometimes referred to as negistors.
Because the asymmetry and doping differences between the base-emitter and base-collector junctions, the avalanche voltages for reversely connected BTJs are usually magnitudes lower than their normal avalanche voltages. Here, I decided to test a few different transistors and see at what voltages the reverse avalanche occur.

The circuit I used is a simple LED flasher, similar to what was described here. As with any circuit that exhibits negative differential resistance, the principle of operation is quite simple. The capacitor is charged via a current limiting resistor…

BJT transistor in reverse avalanche mode - [Link]

21 Mar 2014

Dave explains what the ripple and noise specifications on a power supply is and how to measure it using different methods on both analog and digital oscilloscopes. From bad techniques through to good, showing the effect of each one. Traps for young players aplenty in this one. How do you detect common mode noise issues and ensure that the signal you are measuring is really coming from your device under test?

EEVblog #594 – How To Measure Power Supply Ripple & Noise - [Link]

18 Mar 2014

operation-of-a-bypass-capacitor

Electro Labs has posted a detailed tutorial on why and how to use bypass capacitors:

You may have heard about the phenomenon of bypassing in circuits, however, we may not have sufficient knowledge of how to apply this technique in real circuits. In this tutorial, we will discuss about the bypass capacitors, why we need to use and how to use these capacitors in circuits.

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Bypass Capacitors – Why and How to Use Them? - [Link]

15 Mar 2014

Bill uses a replica of the point contact transistor built by Walter Brattain and John Bardeen at Bell Labs. On December 23, 1947 they used this device to amplify the output of a microphone and thus started the microelectronics revolution that changed the world. He describes in detail why a transistor works by highlighting the uniqueness of semiconductors in being able to transfer charge by positive and negative carriers.

How the first transistor worked - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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