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19 May 2015

ww_gui-600x294

D4p0up shared his open source soundcard oscilloscope in the project log forum:

Here is a tool that might help some of you in your DIY activities : WaveWatch, a soundcard oscilloscope 100% made with Processing.
I’ve just released the 1.3 version, making it a very credible, user friendly and totally open source alternative to existing soundcard scope systems, so that it’s worth sharing it !
It’s got all the features you’d expect from a standard scope,
dual channel,
configurable Triggering (single/Auto),
time and voltage measurement,
frequency calculation,
markers with delta calculation
voltage calibration

Wavewatch, a soundcard oscilloscope and waveform generator – [Link]

9 May 2015

nscope

nScope is a USB-powered oscilloscope, function generator, and power supply that turns any laptop into an electronics workbench.

nScope is a usb-powered device that plugs into an electronics prototyping breadboard. nScope’s main function is an oscilloscope. Much like a multimeter, an oscilloscope measures voltages in a circuit. But unlike a multimeter, it stores voltages over time and displays them in a graph. This makes nScope much more useful for observing sensor signals and dynamic circuits. nScope’s software interface maximizes the graph space, and provides controls for setting the measurement speed and range.

nScope | a lab for every laptop – [Link]

7 Apr 2015

Dave talks about Tektronix’s new unreleased AGO3000 Gravity Compensated Oscilloscope with a high precision TCXO timebase with 2G tip-over gravity compensation.

eevBLAB #8 – New Tektronix AGO3000 Oscilloscope – [Link]

20 Mar 2015

2014-12-19+16.20.02

by vaupell:

I am experimenting with RF and IR signals in various frequencies and had some trouble with the receivers and needed to see what kind of signal i was receiving. I cannot afford a real oscilloscope but i knew about the older Arduino oscilloscopes.

After trying many different versions of code and tutorials, I was unable to get a single one to work, and all the tutorials and guides around was 2-3 years old. Not sure if it is the IDE or the actual hardware that has changed in such a way that it didn’t work anymore.

I finally found a working oscilloscope from a Japanese website, (linked below) and a working TFT screen library, meaning i could read the various signals received.

A simple DIY Oscilloscope with Arduino Uno and Mega – [Link]


14 Mar 2015

Just a bit of fun…I try use an oscilloscope to measure / calculate the speed of sound. I also conduct a hearing test during the video.

Measuring the Speed of Sound with an Oscilloscope – [Link]

21 Feb 2015

miniscope_v2e_pcb3

by Tomasz Ostrowski @ tomeko.net:

Extremely cheap low-speed PC/USB oscilloscope with STM32 (STM32F042) microcontroller.

Announced in January 2014 Cortex-M0 microcontroller family that features crystal-less USB FS device allows to cut noticeable part of BOM when building oscilloscope/recorder similar to miniscope v2c/v2d. STM32F042F devices are interesting in particular because of small and friendly TSSOP20 package with minimum number or power lines.

STM32F042F4 devices feature USB bootloader (DFU), single 1MSps ADC (so single channel sampling would be preferred to avoid crosstalk issues), 16 kB FLASH memory (~2 times more than needed) and 6 kB RAM.

Miniscope v2e – STM32F042 Oscilloscope – [Link]

17 Feb 2015

PICO3400-MSO-desktop

by elektor.com:

Pico Technology has announced that its 3000D Series oscilloscopes launched in October last year now offer deeper memory. This comes on the back of last November’s release of beta drivers for Mac OS X and Linux operating systems for their range of oscilloscopes and data loggers adding to the existing Windows driver. This makes them suitable for use with the BeagleBone Black and Raspberry Pi development boards.

All scopes in this range feature deep memory, allowing high sampling rates to be maintained even at slower sweep speeds for capturing long waveforms in fine detail. Sampling at 1 Gsample/s it can capture a 500 msec waveform (half a billion samples) while hardware acceleration takes care of smooth display updating.

PicoScopes with Deeper Memory – [Link]

11 Feb 2015

Fig_1(1)

The high definition (HD) mode increases the vertical resolution of the R&S RTO and R&S RTE oscilloscopes to up to 16 bits – a 256-fold improvement over 8-bit resolution. Waveforms are sharper and show signal details that would otherwise be masked by noise. Users benefit from even more precise analysis results.

High definition describes the capability of R&S RTO and R&S RTE oscilloscopes to work with applications for which a high vertical resolution is essential. This is especially the case when low-voltage components on a signal that also exhibits high-voltage components need to be analyzed in detail. One example is the characterization of switch mode power supplies. The voltages across the switching device must be determined during the off and on times within the same acquisition. Because the voltage variations during these switching cycles can be several hundred volts, a high resolution is essential for the precise measurement of small voltage components.

High definition oscilloscopes from Rohde & Schwarz: signal analysis with 16-bit vertical resolution – [Link]

1 Feb 2015

In this episode Shahriar does an extensive review and teardown of the Keysight (Agilent) MSO-S Series 10-bit 20GS/s Oscilloscope. This scope supports bandwidths up to 8GHz and 400M points of memory per channel. With hardware 10-bit ADCs as well as an ultra low-noise front-end, this scope offers an impressive dynamic range on all four channels. All scope features are software upgradable.

The teardown consists of a close look at the acquisition board and the system blocks diagram. Various elements such as the ADC structure, FPGAs, memory and the time-base are all examines. The scope offers a +/-12ppb time-base with a 100fs jitter noise floor. Some basic performance measurements are also presented such as noise and SFDR.

The wireless experiment shows the performance of the scope in demodulating very low-power signals on an RF carrier. A -75dBm 2.5GHs QPSK signal can be demodulated by the scope. The instrument can also demodulate a 16QAM signal in presence of an interfering signal which is 44dB higher in signal power. All demodulation experiments are performed using the Keysight VSA.

The backplane experiments demonstrate the scope’s capability to perform jitter and noise analysis on multi-gigabit serial links. The built-in equalization software suites are used to find the FFE coefficients and those coefficients are used to perform hardware equalization in an FPGA communication link.

Review, Teardown and Experiments with a Keysight MSO-S Series 10-bit 20GS/s Oscilloscope – [Link]

26 Jan 2015

by mjlorton @ youtube.com

In this video I explain how a spectrum analyser (Tektronix MDO3000) can be used to view signals in the frequency domain vs an oscilloscope’s time domain.
I give an overview of the logarithmic scale and its benefits vs a linear scale.
I explain how compound wave forms like square and triangle are made up of harmonics.
I do a practical demonstration of how the spectrum analyser works with some example signals. I then show how this can also be done on an oscilloscope using the FFT (fast Fourier transform) maths function.

Spectrum Analyzer, Scope and FFT looking at Signals – [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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