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15 Nov 2014

IMG_5610

by Jeremy Cook @ makezine.com:

Most of us have probably seen clocks or numerical displays that flip sequential boards to display the next number in a sequence. If you wanted to take that a step further, you could make a replica of “Dottie,” which flips small dots as pixels. As the great video below says, it makes a “pleasant mechanical flipping sound all day.” It also tells the date, chimes every 15 minutes, and gives an animation show once an hour.

Dottie the Flip Dot Clock - [Link]

6 Oct 2014

nixie-600x398

Kevin Rye writes:

I’m in the very early stages of prototyping a nixie clock. I picked up some MJE340 power transistors to switch on some IN-3s. I can then use a digital pin on my Arduino to turn on the IN-3s through the transistor. I’ll then have myself a blinking colon for my nixie tube clock.

[via]

Flashing a Nixie with an Arduino - [Link]

26 Sep 2014

FIBMI6CI0C8XQQD.MEDIUM

by Sound Guy @ instructables.com:

You may be familiar with a website in the UK called Colour Clock (http://thecolourclock.co.uk/) which converts the time into a hex value and then uses that value to update the background color. It’s very hypnotic and once you get used to how it works you can actually tell where you are in the day just by glancing at the screen from across the room.

I had an Arduino Uno R3 and an Adafruit 1.8″ Color TFT Shield w/microSD and Joystick that I was trying to use for another project that kept stalling out. One night just for fun I decided to see if I could recreate the Colour Clock and it only took a couple hours. If you’re familiar with Arduino you could easily swap parts out for a simple TFT breakout board and something tiny like a Beetle and make a very compact unit. You could even wear it as a badge.

Arduino TFT Color Clock - [Link]

8 Sep 2014

NewImage39

Meter clock: keeping “current” time. Read more about the clock:

I’ve seen a few meter clocks in my travels of the web, and I love the idea. A few days ago, I decided that I must have one of my own. Such began the “How to do it” pondering cycle. I had seen builds where the face plate of the meter is replaced. This works, but I wanted to try and find a way to do it without modifying the meter, if possible. After some more ponderation, I came up with what I think is a serviceable idea.

I came across this style of milliamp meter on Amazon. They’re not quite 0-60 mA, but the 0-100 mA (a 0-20mA meter for the hours) is close enough. And they were cheap. So yay.

Part of my requirements were that the clock run off of an Arduino Pro Mini I had lying around, and with minimal additional parts. In order to drive the meters with some degree of precision, I would use the PWM pins to vary the effective voltage across a resistor in series with the meter. This would, by the grace of Ohm’s Law, induce a current that, based on the PWM duty cycle, would be scaled in such a way as to move the needle on the meter to the corresponding hour, minute, or second.

One minor issue came up in the form of the max current the GPIO pins on the ATMega328 chip can source/sink. The pins can source/sink a maximum of 40mA, a bit far from the 60mA needed for the minutes and seconds meters. Enter the transistor.

Using a simple NPN transistor switch circuit, I was able to provide the current for the minute and second meters from the 5V supply. The PWM signals switch the respective transistors on and off, effectively varying the voltage across the resistors in series with the meters.

The resistor between 5V and the meter is actually 2 1/4 watt 100 Ohm resistors in parallel for an effective resistance of 50 Ohms. The two in parallel was necessary as 5V x 0.06A = 0.3W (more than 0.25 that a single 1/4W resistor can handle safely).

[via]

Meter clock: keeping “current” time - [Link]


6 Sep 2014

master_clock_16a

by embedded-lab.com:

Brett’s new masterclock is Arduino-controlled and keeps very accurate time by periodically synchronizing with the DCF77 “Atomic” Clock in Mainflingen near Frankfurt, Germany. The DCF77  library for Arduino is used to decode the time signal broadcasted from the atomic clock. The time is displayed as hours, minutes, and seconds on six 1″ seven segment LEDs. A 4×20 I2C LCD display is also used in the project to display additional info such as display brightness, sync information, signal quality, auto tune’d frequency, auto tuned quartz accuracy, etc. Both the displays are auto-dimmed based on the surrounding light intensity using an LDR sensor and pulse width modulation technique. His clock also includes a bluetooth link for updating the Arduino firmware from a PC without an USB cable.

Very accurate master clock synchronized to the DCF77 time signal - [Link]

4 Sep 2014

FG0JHX8HZJOABQA-600x399

Want to build your own world clock? Check out Wouter’s DIY word clock instructables:

…I have found one DIY project that really stands out: Elektronika.ba’s wordclock, proving that it is possible to build your own wordclock that is as pretty as the original. Also, here is a video of the manufacturing process of the original: QLOCKTWO manufacturing
I have decided to build my own version, taking some queues from the sources in the above and making some changes (and adding some mistakes) of my own. Along the way, I have tried to take many pictures and I have written a build report in the form of this Instructable.

[via]

DIY word clock - [Link]

28 Aug 2014

TubeWatch

Johannes’ Numitron GeekWatch features Numitron tubes housed in a hideous 3D printed case:

Numitron tubes are cut-down version of Nixie tubes, but instead of having a wire-mesh anode with a cold-cathode display, uses a seven-segmented indicator commonly found on digital meters and clocks.

[via]

Old School Tube Watch - [Link]

16 Aug 2014

LED_clock

by embedded-lab.com:

This Instructable describes building of a fun and very simple LED clock using Arduino that displays the time to the nearest half hour using LEDs.

Arduino LED clock - [Link]

14 Aug 2014

DSC_0035-600x400

Elia wrote an article detailing his binary wrist watch project:

I have just finished my binary wrist watch project (well, the new revision anyway). I was surprised at how small I was able to make it compared to last time.
I chose to go with the “super-yellow” color LEDs as they fit the purple OSHpark PCB very nicely. The biggest challenge was actually making a good looking wrist band for the watch. I originally intended to use a design like this but it turned out that due to lack of enough para cord I had left, I went with a simpler design that I had done once before.

[via]

DIY binary wrist watch - [Link]

12 Aug 2014

Voltmeter-Clock-Project-600x391

Here’s a voltmeter clock project based on a multimeter clock design by Alan Parekh:

I have used three voltmeters and mounted them on a wooden plinth with a clear Perspex cover to give the clock an industrial look.
I have modified Alan’s code to run on PICBasic Pro version 3. I have also added the following.
Switched display On and Off (keeping battery backup as per Alan’s design) but also allows me to turn meters Off in full power mode.
Synchronization to my Master Clock every 30 seconds
Synchronized LED & Re-Synch LED
Synchronization On & Off
Transistor meter drivers
Separate hourly Chime Circuit
Pulsed “tick tock” seconds sound.

[via]

Voltmeter clock project - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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