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9 Feb 2015

obr1660_uvod

Even your device can be more user friendly thanks to various pictograms displayed on Winstar WEG series displays with a great contrast and viewing angle.

100×16 pixels at series Winstar WEG010016 isn´t that much at the first sight. But when we realize, that such display represents a sort of a “replacement” or “upgrade” of a character display (2×16-20 chars.), we´ll find, that it has wide possibilities of usage and it´s able to display much more than a character one.

Naturally, even a character display is able to display pictograms, but they´re limited by a given row or a matrix creating a given character. On the other hand, at a graphic display the whole area is available and naturally – it´s still able to display characters too.

Similarly like WEH series character displays, even the WEG series supports 4/8-bit interface „6800“/“8080“ and they have a built-in universal controller WS0010.
When we add advantages of OLED displays and attractive price, we have in hands interesting, universally usable display.

Small graphic OLED displays for great prices - [Link]

6 Feb 2015

graphene-flex

by Colin Jeffrey @ gizmag.com:

Researchers from the University of Manchester and University of Sheffield have developed a new prototype semi-transparent, graphene-based LED device that could form the basis of flexible screens for use in the next-generation of mobile phones, tablets and televisions. The incredibly thin display was created using sandwiched “heterostructures”, is only 10-40 atoms thick and emits a sheet of light across its entire surface.

Flexible graphene-based LED clears the way for flexible displays - [Link]

2 Feb 2015

32x7display_small

by Phil Townshend @ edutek.ltd.uk :

A nifty 32×7 dot matrix display module, programmable via an RS232 serial port. There are preset inputs to display preset messages or simply control directly from a PC or laptop.

The principle of the display is based on our persistance of vision, the same thing that enables us to watch movies without seeing the flickering changes of frame. This display has 32 LEDs horizontally by 7 vertically. At any one time there is only ever one column of LEDs lit. The on’s and off’s are presented to the anode connections while the columns are enabled one by one. In this way a dot display of characters can be generated and when the speed is increased sufficiently, we stop seeing the flickering and see it as a steady display of dots.

LED Dot Matrix Display - [Link]

21 Jan 2015

Arduino Nokia 5110 LCD display tutorial #2 – Load Graphics on the display

In this tutorial we are going to learn how to load our custom made graphics into a Nokia 5110 lcd display.

Arduino Nokia 5110 LCD display tutorial - [Link]


19 Jan 2015

1412644_orig

by Joe @ hobbyelectronics.net:

This project was built to monitor the temperature of one of our computer rooms at work that has rather temperamental air-conditioning. The maximum temperature can be set, and if this is exceeded an alarm is activated.The unit gives a continuous display of current temperature and it’s possible for the constructor to change the device program firmware or display board.

LED display Over Temperature Alarm - [Link]

26 Dec 2014

obr1647_1

New 3,2“ and 3,5“ displays from company 4D Systems intended for Raspberry Pi are able to make a complete standalone system from this microcomputer.

Graphic output is always beneficial, enabling to use embedded microcomputer as a user interface (HMI) or at least to display various variables etc. There are many ways to reach it, but probably the most desirable solution would be to connect a display and nothing to solve.

New graphic modules 4DPi-32 and 4DPi-35 belong right to this group of ideal solutions, as they´re directly designed for Raspberry Pi (A,B, B+) – electrically and mechanically, while the I/O connector remains still available.

Simplicity of usage is empowered by a fact, that they don´t require (external) power supply, as they´re powered from the computer itself. Communication is done through a high speed 48 MHz SPI connection. Speed of a built-in processor enables displaying of pictures and videos with up 25 fps speed (even more if images can be compressed). Resistive touch panel enables operation of the whole system without a mouse.

As for the size, there´s only a small difference between 4DPi-32 a 4DPi-35 modules – the biggest difference is in resolution 480 x 320 px (4DPI-35) vs. 320×240 px (4Dpi-32). Both displays display GUI (primary) output of the Raspberry Pi – the same as if we had a monitor connected.

These novelties are already our stable stock item. Detailed information will provide you the 4DPi-32 and 4DPi-35 datasheets.

Add the 4-th dimension to your Raspberry Pi - [Link]

11 Dec 2014

code-lock-using-arduino

by praveen @ circuitstoday.com:

We have published a digital code lock using arduino some weeks before. This one is a little different. The earlier version was based on a defined password, where the user can not change it. Moreover there was no LCD display interfaced with the project to output lock status. This project is a much improved version of the same digital code lock which comes with a user defined password and LCD display. The user will be prompted to set a password at installation. This password inputted at installation will continue to serve the lock until it is changed. The user can change the current password with a single key press. The program will check for current password and allows the user to change password only if the the current password is input correctly.

Digital Code Lock using Arduino with LCD Display - [Link]

27 Nov 2014

FLNQVLCI2TR1IVC.MEDIUM

by df99 @ instructables.com:

This is an OLED clock I built using an Arduino Micro, a tiny OLED 128×64 display using the SSD1306 controller and I2C interface, and a precision DS3231-based real-time clock module with rechargeable battery backup. It features a menu system for setting the RTC (no serial port or USB required)

DS3231 OLED clock with 2-button menu setting and temperature display - [Link]

22 Nov 2014

obr1459_1

 

Minimal power consumption, slim design and a big amount of available versions with multi-color backlight – these are some benefits of the EADOG series displays.

EADOG series is familiar to many of you and probably it´s your favorite one from these main reasons:

  • displays are unusually flat (thin)
  • the have a very low power consumption of 100-s uA (without backlight)
  • wide possibilities of backlight, monochrome and also RGB
  • some types are well legible even without backlight
  • simple communication through 4/8 bit or SPI interface and newly even I2C

So far, types with up to 128x64px or 3×16 characters were available. The most recent additions to the EADOG family are bigger types with resolution of 160x104px (EADOGXL160), 240x64px (EADOGM240), 240x128px (EADOGXL240) and 4×20 characters (EADOGM204) and appropriate backlight modules EALED66x40, EALED94x40 and EALED94x67. Also these new types maintain a low profile – only 5.8 or 6.5mm with backlighting. A positivity is that even these new types are based on standard LCD controllers.

A guide at a choice of a suitable combination of display +backlight will provide you the application described in our article – Start with the EA DOG displays for free.

Detailed information will provide you the datasheets at particular types.

Industrial applications rely on the EA DOG displays - [Link]

18 Nov 2014

obr1623_uvod

With the Bolymin graphic embedded module it´s possible to focus only on software development – hardware is done.

Term: 2014.11.19 10:00 – 11:30 CET

How to effectively handle human-machine interface in your applications? - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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