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22 Jul 2014

obr1561_uvod

Viewing angle around 160°-170° and an excellent contrast say in favor of character displays with OLED technology.

OLED technology (Organic LED) slowly but surely finds its place even in industrial devices. After a big success at mobile phones, where they convince by high contrast and an excellent viewing angle, this technology becomes price-affordable and technologically advanced even for industrial applications.Benefits in short:

  • OLED means, that every pixel is principally one „planar“ LED, thus each pixel emits light (white, RGB or some color). That means, that OLED doesn´t have / doesn´t need backlight and it also helps to a high contrast, as there´s no problem with a light bleeding through “off” (black) pixels, as it is often at LCD displays. High contrast also ensures excellent legibility even at a strong daylight.
  • wide viewing angle. As every pixel (point) is itself a light source, it shines in all directions (half-globe) and it provides an extreme viewing angle near to a theoretical maximum of 180°
  • extremely wide operating temperatures range, frost doesn´t “slow down” display response time
  • the same color from every viewing angle. This is vital at color (RGB) OLED displays and it means almost zero color shift at viewing from various viewing angles, so well-known from TFT LCD displays
  • low power consumption, partially dependent on a display content (number of switched-on pixels and their intensity)

New character displays from company Winstar belong to advanced displays with declared features. In our stock can be found types for example WEH001602ABPP5N00000 (16×2, blue), WEH001602AWPP5N00000 (16×2, white), WEH002002ALPP5N00001 (20×2, yellow/orange – „amber“) and WEH002004ALPP5N00000 (20×4, yellow/orange – „amber“) and other. They all have 8-bit parallel interface „6800“ and a modern controller WS0010. Direct comparison of OLED display with an FSTN LCD is best illustrated in the attached video.

OLED displays can be read even “from a side” - [Link]

11 Jul 2014

H

by elektor.com:

Trulife Optics together with the National Physics Laboratory has demonstrated a new type of transparent head-up display device. According to Simon Hall, lead scientist of Adaptive Optics at the NPL the new technology is unlike existing solutions: “Google’s solution is effectively a prism; it’s like a half-silvered mirror that you’re looking into and the Epson Moverio uses an embedded, slightly different refractive index component in a very thick lens which is reflecting light travelling through the rather thick waveguide”.

This new component is set to transform the development of wearable augmented reality and head-up display devices. Jonathan Lewis, CEO at Trulife optics commented that, “The development of wearable augmented reality devices has been curtailed by the lack of an optical component that allows for the overlay of high-definition, full colour images. But with the launch of our optic, we are providing that missing piece in the augmented reality jigsaw.”

Novel Wearable Optical Display - [Link]

13 Jun 2014

FD51N05HW8T4M3B.MEDIUM

qubist @ instructables.com writes:

The Ultimate Altimeter is a super-compact, Arduino controlled altimeter capable of measuring the altitude with an accuracy of 0.3 meters, and saving the highest and lowest values it has measured. It is powered by a 40 mAh Lithium Polymer battery, uses a tiny LCD Bubble Display, and measures altitude with a MPL3115A2 Altitude Sensor. It’s very simple and fairly easy to build with just six major components. Additionally, an optional 3D printed case can house the Altimeter.

The Ultimate Altimeter – A compact, Arduino altimeter - [Link]

4 Jun 2014

Digital_Time_Keeper

sameer @ sgprojects.co.in writes:

Here I’m introducing a simple and very useful project to store the running time of any device. The running time in minutes can be seen on a 7-segment display and can be reset at any time to it’s initial zero condition by pressing a switch. It can be easily installed by connecting it in parallel with any device.

Digital Time Keeper - [Link]


3 Jun 2014

IMG_20140420_1434271

OLED Watch v4.2 @ Walltech. John writes-

I just finished writing up my OLED Watch project on my website! I took loads of great pictures, and explained the whole thought process of the project, as well as the hard ware and software behind it! I’ve officially released the board files and the code under the appropriate creative commons licenses, and just wanted to let you know that it’s all now online on walltech.cc! You guys have been strong supporters of my projects and really thank you for that.

The open source hardware and software OLED Watch - [Link]

1 Jun 2014

obr1536_2

Displays called as “Electronic ink” or “e-Paper” are a real electronic form of a paper.

For those of you, who are not familiar with this type of displays yet, we´l mention, that it´s a so called electrophoretic display, i.e. Display containing white particles in microcapsules dispersed in a thin layer of a dark high-viscosity liquid. These particles can be moved or turned by a short voltage impulse, what will cause a given pixel to appear as white. Similarly an impulse of a reverse polarity will cause a given pixel to appear as black or it can also be grey (usually 4 shades of grey). High viscosity of a liquid causes that microparticles remain their position practically forever (years). That means, that this type of displays only need an electric energy to change a displayed content (!). In other words it´s an ideal display for battery powered devices. From some point of view is the behavior of ePaper display similar to bistable (latching) relays. A display is reflexive, i.e. doesn´t require backlight but for a good legibility at least a low ambient light is necessary. It´s advantageous that the display is easily readable even on a direct sunlight. A charm of ePaper display is also in the fact, that a displayed content is really similar to that sketched/ written on a paper.  The first type of ePaper displays in our offer is a 2“ (172*72 px) display from company Electronic Assembly EAEPA20-A. The module is only 1.18mm thin and it only needs a few additional components for its operation. Power supply is single – 3,3V (no other voltages are required) and the display contains a standard controller SSD1606 with a 4-wire SPI interface.

Detailed information will provide you the EA_ePaper datasheet. Upon request, company Electronic Assembly is able to produce any ePaper display up to 300×300 mm size (MOQ 1000 pcs).

Display displaying without a power supply is available even for you - [Link]

 

21 May 2014

Luca Dentella has published his latest project: BlueMatrix. [via]

It’s a portable LED matrix display based on Arduino Uno, powered by a Lipo battery and connected via Bluetooth to a personal computer or an Android smartphone. I’ve also developed the controlling app for Android, available on Google’s PlayStore.

All the schematics, source files, inkscape files for the enclosure etc., are available on my blog and in my GitHub repository.

BlueMatrix – Bluetooth controlled LED matrix - [Link]

10 May 2014

Detailed look at methods for driving LED matrix displays, including simple LED displays and full-colour video screen modules.

Driving LED matrix displays with an FPGA - [Link]

7 May 2014

P5_Title

Raj of Embedded Lab has a series of chipKIT tutorials. This 5th project will show you how to build a digital stopwatch on seven segment LED display with the chipKIT Uno32:

In this project, we will use the chipKIT Uno32 board to build a digital stopwatch capable of timing minutes, seconds, and 1/10th of seconds, and with a basic start and stop control feature. A MAX7219-driven 8-digit seven segment LED display is used to display the time elapsed. The Reset switch on the Uno32 board will be used to reset the current time back to 0 when the stopwatch is stopped.

[via]

chipKIT Project 5: Digital stopwatch on seven segment LED display - [Link]

30 Apr 2014

oled_display

by Kalle Hyvönen:

I needed a display for a project of mine and was just going to use a regular HD44780 -based text LCD display, until I spotted some very neat looking TINY OLED-displays from eBay.

The displays are monochrome 128×32 pixel displays with a 4-wire SPI bus and they are around 30x11mm in size (the actual display area is under an inch diagonally!). The exact type of the displays is UG-2832HSWEG04. I found a datasheet for the displays and a datasheet for the actual display controller (SSD1306) and they seemed easy enough to use so I ordered a two of them for just $13.

Using a neat little OLED-display with an Arduino - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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