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9 Jul 2012

A DCF77 time signal receiver with USB connection. Emulates a serial interface (COMx) using CDC and works with Windows 2000 to 7, 32 or 64 bit, and with Linux. Should also work with Windows 98, Me, and MacOS.

FunkUsb: Radio controlled clock receiver with USB - [Link]

9 Jul 2012

Jürgen Beisert writes:

I like the handy DCF77 signal. In this project no clock should use it, instead the computers in my home network should be served by a precise time reference. Due to the fact most other interfaces are no longer available on modern computers, it uses the USB to forward the prepared DCF77 signal to the host.

DCF77 to USB converter - [Link]

11 Jun 2012

www.changpuak.ch writes:

Well, our meetings take place on wednesdays at 10:30 (sharp). A radio controlled clock is used to determine whether you are late (and must bring a cake next time) or not. Unfortunately the identical radio controlled clock in my office always shows a different time :-(

After baking a lot of cakes, I thought about synchronising these disreputable clocks …

Homebrew DCF-77 Signal Generator - [Link]

17 Apr 2012

SYM-RFT-77 DCF77 module with standard antenna (60x7mm)

Using a better antenna to improve DCF77 reception on long distances

We are in the prototyping phase of building a Nixie clock using 1N-14 Nixie tubes. The clock is designed around a PIC16F886 MCU, 74141N BCD decoder/driver and CNY74 optocouplers using common circuit topology. High DC voltage (+ 180VDC ) is generated using MAX1771 step-up switching regulator, which is quite efficient (if you use appropriate components).

Our clock will have some nice features:

  • Compact design
  • Manual time configuration
  • DCF77 time synchronization
  • Sync success indicator
  • HV shutdown during sync (to reduce noise received by DCF module)
  • Super-capacitor time backup
  • Thermal protection
  • ICSP connector etc.

When clock is complete we will release it as open source-hardware here at Electronics-Lab.com

We decided to use DCF77 signal as time reference for two main reasons, it’s quite easy to receive it and it’s very accurate for the reason that carrier signal is generated from atomic clocks.

But, what about receiving and decoding DCF77 signal?  Read the rest of this entry »


9 Apr 2012

This project is a converter from DCF77 to USB, including Windows Software.

USB DCF77 - [Link]

12 Mar 2012

Matthias Franz writes:

The time manipulator is the little brother of the time signal transmitter located in Mainflingen close to Frankfurt in Germany. The very low frequency transmitter  located there has an output power of 50 kW and is called, in accordance to its call sign, DCF77 (similar to HBG, MSF, RWM and WWV, WWVB, WWVH). The transmitter is operated by the Media Broadcast GmbH and transmits on 77.5 kHz the official time signal for Germany. The medium range is stated with 2’000 km.

My time manipulator however offers some more functionalities. It’s the true alternative if you have difficulties to find your flux capacitor or your local electricity supplier canceled your contract after you had difficulties to pay off for the 1.21 GW.

Homemade 77.5 kHz DCF77 time signal transmitter - [Link]

7 Feb 2012

www.sundgren.se writes:

The DCF77 Simulator is a combined simulator and demonstrator. It generates DCF77 time code at the same time as it displays the code in different views. The time code to be generated can be set to any time between 2000-01-01 and 2099-12-31.

The simulator can control DCF clocks via two interfaces:

  • Electrical
  • Radio-signal via a built in low-power transmitter

DCF77 Simulator - [Link]

18 Jan 2012

Receiving the DCF77 signal from Frankfurt. Distance between Frankfurt and Thessaloniki approx. 1500 km

Receiver datasheet : http://www.pvelectronics.co.uk/rftime/SYM-RFT-XX.pdf
More info : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DCF77

Receiving the DCF77 signal in Thessaloniki, Greece - [Link]

9 Jun 2008

The clock is synchronised via the German time signal DCF77. It has a display with automatic brightness control and a RS232 computer interface. Arvin writes:

The clock is built around a PIC16F84 microcontroller from Microchip. I chose this microcontroller since its FLASH memory is easy to program and assembler and programmer software is freely available for GNU/Linux. It has 13 general input/output pins which is just enough to implement all the feature I wanted.

[via]

A DCF77 Clock with RS232 Interface - [Link]

31 May 2008

Demo-application for Philips LPC2000 ARM7TDMI controller with a KS0108/KS0107-based graphics-LCD (128*64 pixels), DCF77 time-receiver and Onewire-Bus (for DS18×20-Temp.-Sensor).The time and date are received with a DCF77-receiver-module .The DCF77-signal is transmitted from a station near Frankfurt/Main, Germany and can be received all over Europe, North Africa and the Middle-East. [via]

T-Clock - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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