Home Blog  





5 Jun 2014

5775Fig01

This article shows how to produce negative output voltages from positive input voltages using the MAX17501 and MAX17502 synchronous step-down converters. By Dipankar Mitra:

Industrial control equipment such as programmable logic controllers, I/O modules, mass flow controllers, and various other sensors and supporting systems use analog components like amplifiers and multiplexers that operate on negative supply voltage. Typically operating at ±12V, ±18V or other variations, these voltages are generated from a 24V DC bus. Maxim’s portfolio of high-voltage synchronous buck regulators offer 50% lower power loss allowing customers to operate their equipment 50% cooler. In this application note, we discuss techniques to use these synchronous buck regulators to generate negative voltages.

AppNote: How to Use the MAX17501 and MAX17502 for Negative Output Voltage Applications – [Link]

4 Jun 2014

dn512f1

by Charlie Zhao:

The trend in automobiles and industrial systems is to replace mechanical functions with electronics, thus multiplying the number of microcontrollers, signal processors, sensors, and other electronic devices throughout. The issue is that 24V truck electrical systems and industrial equipment use relatively high voltages for motors and solenoids while the microcontrollers and other electronics require much lower voltages. As a result, there is a clear need for compact, high efficiency step-down converters that can produce very low voltages from the high input voltages.

LTC Design Note: 65V 500mA step-down converter – [Link]

1 Jun 2014

adafruit_products_1904-00

Tutorial – MicroLipo and MiniLipo Battery Chargers @ The Adafruit Learning System.

Sooner or later you’ll need to cut the cord…the power cord! Untether your electronic project from the tyranny of the wall adapter and take it out into the world. That’s where batteries come in, and you may have been seduced by the high power density, large current capabilites and recharge-ability of Lithium Polymer or Lithium Ion batteries. These battery chemistries have quickly become the most popular rechargeable batteries in consumer products, powering everything from keychain mp3 players to huge laptops.

Tutorial – MicroLipo and MiniLipo Battery Chargers – [Link]

29 May 2014

charger-apple-primary-inner-diagram

by Ken Shirriff:

Disassembling Apple’s diminutive inch-cube iPhone charger reveals a technologically advanced flyback switching power supply that goes beyond the typical charger. It simply takes AC input (anything between 100 and 240 volts) and produce 5 watts of smooth 5 volt power, but the circuit to do this is surprisingly complex and innovative.

Apple iPhone charger teardown – [Link]


28 May 2014

IMG_0184

by bitsofmymind.com:

The Joule thief is a really fascinating circuit, simple yet very intricate. Basically, it’s a step-up converted in its most elementary expression. I will spare you the theory since there is plenty of information on it on the web; rustybolt.info is a good place to start.

Joule thieves in all sorts of forms have been featured countless time on DIY websites and I felt it was time I build one. However, I did not want to leave the circuit at the breadboard stage because as it stands, the joule thief has characteristics that make it very attractive for all sorts of low power applications and I figured a flash light would be a very good home for a joule thief, where having the option of using dead batteries is certainly a big plus not to mention using less cells because the circuit steps the voltage up. Why dead batteries? Because a battery is never really dead, its voltage just falls down logarithmically until it hits a point where the device it was powering up stops functioning, which does not mean the battery is totally drained but rather that its voltage has fallen below a usable level. Since joule thieves are step-up converters, they can take that “dead” battery, and give it a new life by stepping up its output voltage to usable levels again.

Maglite Joule thief – [Link]

21 May 2014

Stanford researchers, lead by electrical engineer Ada Poon, are working on midfield wireless power for medical implants, ranging in application from nerve stimulation to medication delivery. [via]

Midfield Wireless Power for Implants – [Link]

10 May 2014

Li-Ion_battry_charger

By Tahar Allag, Wenjia Liu:

Cell phones are a good example of how functionality and performance have both increased significantly in portable devices over the last few decades. They have become more complex and can do many basic tasks as well as any computer. The extra functionality that has transitioned the smartphone from a phone-call-only device to a multipurpose portable device, which makes it more power hungry than ever before.

The internal battery pack is the main source of storing and delivering power to portable-device circuitry. Batterycharger ICs are responsible for charging the battery pack safely and efficiently. They must also control the power delivery to the system to maintain normal operation while plugged in to wall power. The battery pack is required to store a large amount of energy and be charged in a short amount of time without sacrificing weight and volume. The increased charge and discharge currents, as well as the smaller physical size, make the packs vulnerable to physical and thermal stresses. Therefore, battery chargers are no longer required to perform just as a simple standalone charger

AppNote: Battery charging considerations for high-power portabledevices – [Link]

10 May 2014

BQ2419xBy Jing Ye, Jeff Falin, KK Rushil:

Designers of rechargeable battery-powered equipment want a charger that minimizes charge time with maximum charge current by maximizing the power taken from the supply without collapsing the supply. Resistances between the supply and the battery present a challenge. This article explains how to design the charging circuit to achieve the maximum power from the adapter despite the undesired resistances between the supply and battery.

AppNote: Extract maximum power from the supply when charging a battery – [Link]

9 May 2014

6f78088d76a377297006a0ec2bd60404_large

One, tiny Dart. Power for all your devices. Perfect for your mobile lifestyle.

The Dart is the world’s smallest, lightest laptop adapter. At a powerful 65W it is a perfect complement to today’s thin, lightweight, portable laptops. It fits in a pocket and is designed with a USB port and single outlet profile to make it easy for you to stay charged up when you’re on the road. We hope you are as excited about the Dart as we are and looking forward to finally carrying just one, tiny Dart to charge all your electronics. Join our campaign and never be stuck powerless again!

Dart: The World’s Smallest Laptop Adapter – [Link]

8 May 2014
Example DC-DC converter with SYNC input

Example DC-DC converter with SYNC input

by Michael Dunn:

Most electronics today requires multiple supply voltages – four or more rails is not uncommon. But if you’re using multiple, unsynchronized DC-DC converters, you’ve not only got a sub-optimal design, you’re asking for trouble. This Design Idea solves both problems.

Why trouble? I have firsthand experience of multiple power frequencies used in a system which also included sensitive analog electronics. Under certain conditions, difference frequencies (e.g., 10kHz, if one switcher was running at 250kHz, and another at 260kHz) would show up in high-impedance analog sections. Not good.

Avoid problems with multiple DC-DC converters – [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

Search Site | Advertising | Contact Us
Elektrotekno.com | Free Schematics Search Engine | Electronic Kits