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31 Jan 2012

We bring you a favourite protective lacquer for PCBs in a convenient 1l bulk package. If you used this agent so far in a form of sprays, in a bigger amount, or you need to treat devices by dipping, then this package is intended just for you.

Plastik 70 is a transparent protective and insulating coating, protecting PCBs and components from humidity, leakages and also eliminates vibrations of small components. In case of necessity, for example at repair, it is solderable and also can be removed with the Plastik 70 thinner. It is not aggressive and is well compatible to most of material used in electronics, only in the case of some very sensitive plastics, it is suitable to test their sensitivity before application.

Advantages / Features:

  1. protective transparent coating
  2. high coverage – up to 9m2/liter/20μm
  3. protects from humidity and leakage currents
  4. protects from atmospheric influences
  5. quick-drying
  6. solderable
  7. removable by a thinner
  8. universal usage on various surfaces

Plastik 70 in a 1l package can be applied by a brush, dipping and after diluting also by spraying. Plastik 70 has a relatively low viscosity and a good penetration ability, that´s why it is an ideal solution for application by dipping of PCBs or single components like transformers and coils. Inspite of the fact, that the price per 1 liter of the product at sprays is similar to the price of 1l bulk package, this 1l package is more than 50% cheaper. It is caused by almost 2,5x higher yield (lower thinner content). Lower thinner content further improves working conditions in a workshop and decreases air pollution. PLASTIK 70 can also be used as a universal protective coating on surfaces like metal, paper, paintings, furniture, etc.

Detailed description will provide you the Plastik 70 datasheet as well as safety datasheet.

With the 1 liter package of Plastik 70 you can protect your PCBs 50% cheaper - [Link]

29 Jan 2012

EagleUp is a new way to render Eagle PCBs in 3D. It integrates with Google Sketchup so it’s possible to design cases around the PCB model:

version 4 has been released. Most of the import and export procedures have been automatized to simplify the process, so that you can focus in design, and not in the conversion 2D/3D.

With the version 4, you export from Eagle in 2 clicks, and import into sketchup in 3 clicks. No more tiring image creation and manual import necessary. Give it a try !

Eagle 3D is another way to make 3D board renderings, and it works for non-Windows users too. [via]

EagleUP brings PCBs to Google Sketchup - [Link]

2 Nov 2011

Making a PCB – PCB Manufacture step by step @ Eurocircuits – [via]

Step 01- Introduction – Eurocircuits Educational movies – making a PCB
Step 02 – Front-end tool data preparation
Step 03 – Preparing the phototools
Step 04 – Print inner layers
Step 05 – Etch inner layers
Step 06 -Register punch and Automatic Optical Inspection (AOI)
Step 07 – Lay-up and bond
Step 08 – Drilling the PCB
Step 09 – Electroless copper deposition
Step 10 – Image the outer layers
Step 11 – Plating
Step 12 – Etch outer layers
Step 13 – Apply soldermask
Step 14 – RoHS-compliant surface finishes – electroless gold over nickel
Step 15 – Plated gold edge connectors
Step 16 – Silk-screen and cure
Step 17 – Profiling
Step 18 – Electrical test
Step 19 – Final inspection

Making a PCB – PCB Manufacturing step by step - [Link]

2 Nov 2011

adafruit.com writes:

PCB layout is tough. Laying out a PCB isn’t in itself too hard once you learn how the tools work, but high-speed (10MHz+) introduces a virtual mine field of potential issues that you may not be aware of until it’s too late. While experience is the best teacher, Analog Devices has a great application note explaining some of the key pitfalls to avoid when dealing with high speed designs (which is basically anything today): A Practical Guide to High-Speed Printed-Circuit-Board Layout. Some of it is a bit heady, but not more than it needs to be, and it really does lay out a lot of key information that you may not have been aware of. Want to improve your PCB design skills? Print this out, and keep reading through it until it starts to make sense. There’s years of bench time worth of information in there.

EEBookshelf: High Speed PCB Layout - [Link]


2 Nov 2011

Converting an Inkjet Printer to Print PCBs. Ryan writes in… [via]

I really enjoy reading the Adafruit blog and thought my project would fit in perfectly. I’ve created an Instructable that follows my entire build process as I took a stock Epson C86 inkjet printer and modified it to print on copper clad board. Using this printer and a specialized ink I am able to simply print out boards and etch them. While this project has been done before I’ve yet to see a source where the modification is completely documented in a step-by-step fashion.

Converting an Inkjet Printer to Print PCBs - [Link]

2 Nov 2011

redFrog Pick and Place machine – example of the pick and place process – [via]

This video demonstrates the process from solder paste application to picking and placing the SMD components to the final flowing of the solder. The picking and placing is done using the new redFrog pick and place machine.

redFrog Pick and Place machine - [Link]

20 Sep 2011

Jeri Ellsworth just shared a post about how Charles Lohr has developed a method for making glass PCBs. Charles goes step by step in how he makes a touch controlled LED board. [via]

How to make Clear Glass PCBs - [Link]

26 Jul 2011

CircuitPeople – Free Online Gerber File Viewer… [via]

CircuitPeople – Free Online Gerber File Viewer - [Link]

26 Jun 2011

RS Components has released PCB Converter for SketchUp, a software tool that converts CAD files in Intermediate Data Format (IDF) to Collada format for use in SketchUp. This enables designers to use SketchUp as a 3D CAD back-end for to PCB design and brings SketchUp into the electronic product design realm. [via]

Converter for Google SketchUp gives PCB designers 3D eCAD functionality – [Link]

26 Jun 2011

diodenring.de writes:

I am using a positive photo-lithographic process to transfer the artwork to a photosensitized, copper cladded PCB laminate. Positive means, that during the development step the protective coating on the copper is removed in those places that were previously exposed to UV light. So the artwork has to block UV light where you want the traces on the board.

How you can make perfect PCBs yourself – [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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