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30 Oct 2014

ReyPlaying

LED matrices are a popular mean of displaying text, graphics, and animated information at gas stations, convenient stores, and many other public places. Raj’s new project is about making a Bluetooth-enabled 8×64 LED matrix display, where you can send the text messages through a smartphone over a Bluetooth connection. He used Arduino as the main controller and an HC-06 Bluetooth adapter to receive data from the smartphone. He has shared all of his design files and Arduino firmware on his blog.

DIY LED Matrix Display with Bluetooth support - [Link]

20 Oct 2014

FFBU76WI1C1HERC.MEDIUM

by jollifactory @ instructables.com:

We have created two game project instructables so far using the jolliFactory Bi-color LED Matrix Driver Module D.I.Y kits we designed. This LED Matrix module is designed to be chain-able so you may daisy-chain the modules together to the number of modules you need to suit your project.

Arduino based Bi-color LED Matrix Pong Game - [Link]

26 Sep 2014

princeton-led-efficiency-increase

by Colin Jeffrey @ gizmag.com:

With LEDs being the preferred long-lasting, low-energy method for replacing less efficient forms of lighting, their uptake has dramatically increased over the past few years. However, despite their luminous outputs having increased steadily over that time, they still fall behind more conventional forms of lighting in terms of brightness. Researchers at Princeton University claim to have come up with a way to change all that by using nanotechnology to increase the output of organic LEDs by 57 percent.

Breakthrough in LED construction increases efficiency by 57 percent - [Link]

24 Sep 2014

apa102-600x397

cpldcpu writes:

I contrast to the very timing-sensitive one-wire protocol of the WS2812, the APA102 uses a standard two wire SPI protocol – one clock line and one data line. Each LED has two inputs and two outputs which can be daisy chained. At the first sight this may seem wasteful, but it has the advantage of being supported by standard microcontroller periphery and it is insensitive to timing variations. Due to the critical timing requirement it is not possible to control the WS2812 from SOCs with multitasking operating systems, such as the Raspberry Pi. This should not be an issue with the APA102. Furthermore, the data can be transferred at an almost arbitrary clock rate. I was able to control the LEDs with 4 MHz SPI clock without any hitch. It appears that the maximum speed is mainly limited by the parasitics of the wiring.

[via]

APA102 aka “Superled” - [Link]


22 Sep 2014

pca964bbheader-600x145

Ondřej Karas of DoItWireless writes:

 If You are interested in LED driving through RF, this article would be interesting for you. I tested own PCA9634 breakout board for this chip and wrote simple low level driver for IQRF TR-52D module. Next week, I am going to publish PC application for comfortable operation with that.

[via]

Wireless LED driver with PCA9634 - [Link]

13 Sep 2014

20140901_171702

by Jose Daniel Herrera:

Here I present another project based on a addressable LEDs strip, based on WS2812b leds.

It consists of an ‘electronic’ candle, which lets you select set colors, adjust the intensity, and have different effects like rainbow, fade and fire. The project arose from the purchase of an IKEA lantern model BORBY … the idea was to replace a candle of considerable size, for something more … modern.

Candle with remote control and Arduino Pro Mini - [Link]

10 Sep 2014

blue1

Diego shares his latest project a WP8 bluetooth RGB LED controller with pic12f1572 16bit pwm:

I made a Bluetooth board card with a pic12f1572, this pic can drive 3 output pwm at 16bit.

[via]

WP8 bluetooth RGB LED controller with pic12f1572 16bit pwm - [Link]

9 Sep 2014

DI5462f1

by Marian Stofka:

Standard optocoupler speed is limited mainly by the relatively slow response of the phototransistor. This Design Idea adds components to the LED drive side to speed things up.

R1 is the original LED resistor, as used before the extra circuitry was added. Here however, its value can be higher, as the turn-on speed is determined mainly by the added circuit. You can thus save power, and also drive the LED with a less powerful driver.

Optocoupler speed-up also reduces power consumption - [Link]

9 Sep 2014

dsc00021-600x450

Elmars Ositis has been working on a simple constant current driver:

In my previous post, I slapped together a quick LED lighting solution for my workbench… but it is truly a hack. What I really want to do is make a simple constant current driver, so the power LEDs can be used in other projects. One of those projects is an LED swimming pool light. It needs to be running at maximum brightness and low cost.

After much digging and testing, I found a simple circuit using a power FET, an OP Amp and 0.5 ohm resistor.
This simple circuit accepts a VCC up to 32v (limited by the Op-Amp). The 78L05 regulator provides a stable 5v reference and R1 is a potentiometer serving as a voltage divider, with the output on pin 2 serving as a reference voltage for the basic LM358 Op-Amp.

[via]

Simple constant current driver for a high power LED - [Link]

31 Aug 2014

IMGP10016-600x450

madworm writes:

Just wanting to share one of my latest projects, made possible by DirtyPCBs. I got a lot of good boards (actually 2 designs) and saved 25$ using this service. Very nice.
It’s a simple thing, just a micro (ATmega168) + a bunch of WS2812B LEDs. Main purpose: more colours :-)
It’s meant to fit nicely into IKEA Samtid lamps, runs with 5V DC and takes up to 2.75A. The control module is removable, so one doesn’t have to rip the lamp apart every time you change code. I used microMaTch connectors, as they’re somewhat low profile, at least compared to standard headers, and provide quite good mechanical support.

[via]

IKEA Samtid mood-light upgrade - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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