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26 Mar 2015

article-2015march-improved-silicon-substrate-fig3

by Steven Keeping @ digikey.com:

The dominant technology for today’s high-brightness LEDs is gallium nitride (GaN) on sapphire or silicon carbide (SiC) substrates. These materials are popular because the resultant LEDs are bright, efficient, and last a long time. However, the chips are tough to manufacture and package into useable devices, multiplying the cost of end products that use them as light engines. Although prices have plummeted in recent years, LED lighting is still considerably more expensive to purchase than traditional alternatives. This initial expense is cited as a major factor slowing the acceptance of solid-state lighting (SSL).

A pioneering group of manufacturers has worked hard to reduce the cost of high-power LEDs by replacing the sapphire or SiC substrate with silicon (Si), the material routinely used to manufacture most electronic chips (“ICs”). The key benefit is a very-low-cost supply of wafers and the opportunity to use depreciated 8-inch wafer fabs for LED manufacture. Combined, those concepts enable a dramatic reduction in LED prices, overcoming consumer objections.

Improved Silicon-Substrate LEDs Address High Solid-State Lighting Costs - [Link]

24 Mar 2015

by Dooievriend @ tweakblog.tweakblogs.net:

More than a year ago, a friend of mine asked me to write the software for his 3D Spectrum Analyser (3DSA): a device that takes as input an audio signal, and outputs its visualisation on a 3D matrix of leds. If the above description doesn’t quite ring a bell, simply watch the end result in action.

First things first though, the microprocessor to be programmed was an 80MHz Olimex PIC32, soldered to the PIC32-PINGUINO-OTG development board. (For those who ever tinkered with Arduino boards: it’s the same, only with a faster chip and fewer builtin libraries ) The Algorithm had to sample the input signal at regular time intervals, convert this signal to the frequency domain, and visualize the detected frequencies on a 16x16x5 LED matrix.

3D Spectrum Analyser - [Link]

23 Mar 2015

FirstOverview

We can control almost everything from our smartphone, tablet or smart watch these days, and thanks to the CleverLight™ Wi-Fi LED bulb, you can now control your lighting remotely without additional box.

We are pleased to announce that we have launched a new and unique product CleverLight™ Wi-Fi LED bulb.

Installation is as simple as removing your old bulb and installing CleverLight™ Wi-Fi LED bulb. Wall switch retains functionality.

In comparison to an incandescent bulb which lasts approximately 1,000 hours, CleverLight™ Wi-Fi LED bulb last at least 25,000 hours apiece at an estimated lifetime more than 20 years. With our LED technology 85 percent less power is needed than incandescent bulbs. CleverLight™ using up to 9 watts compared to a 60 watt incandescent bulb. Be smart with your energy.

To create the best user experience possible, we use Smart Config™ — a one-step and one-time process used to connect the CleverLight™ to a Wi-Fi network.
Just connect your Wi-Fi enabled phone or tablet to your access point, then enter your network’s password into the CleverLight™ App, and the setup process completes in less than thirty seconds.

CleverLight – Affordable Smart Wi-Fi LED Light Bulb - [Link]

24 Feb 2015

bitcake_photo1

Impress your friend with the ultimate geek’s Birthday Cake! A hand-made open source electronic cake with candles you can blow out!

  • Features 9 LED candles that you can blow on, to make them flicker and go out, like you do with a real birthday cake! Each candle blinks with random period and phase that depends on the intensity of the air flow
  • Piezo sensor and a special air trap to detect air flow with astounding sensitivity using resonance effect
  • Atmel ATTiny44 microcontroller on board with 4 kilobytes of flash memory and 256 bytes RAM
  • Open source hardware and firmware. Can be re-programmed with an ICSP programmer or Arduino board via Arduino IDE
  • Size 42 x 42 x 18 mm, weight 26g
  • Powered by a single AAAA/LR61 battery (included)
  • 3.3V step-up converter on board
  • Ultra low shutdown current (less than 1 uA in deep shutdown)
  • Hand-soldered using lead-free solder

BitCake – Electronic Birthday Cake - [Link]


19 Feb 2015

obr1658_1

SosElectronics offers you simply applicable solution of a power LED on a thermal clad in a special offer! 

LXML-PWN1-0100

  • power white SMD LED Luxeon Rebel
  • luminous flux min. 100 lm / 350 mA
  • specified to continuous 700 mA / 3,2 V
  • made on a ceramic base with electrically insulated thermal pad
  • guaranteed lumen maintanance 70% of original value at 50 000 hrs / 700mA / Tj 135°C
  • low moisture sensitivity – JEDEC Level 1
  • dimensions: 4,61 x 3,17 x 2,10 mm

BERGQUIST 803127

  • thermal clad for Lumileds Luxeon Rebel
  • optimal heat transfer from LED to heatsink
  • longer LED lifetime and luminosity thanks to a lower operating temperature
  • star board
  • easy application


Readily usable LED for exceptional price - [Link]

16 Feb 2015

led_curve

by Donald Schelle @ ti.com:

Achieving optimal performance of an LED luminaire or LED backlight design requires numerous trade-offs. Understanding an LED’s power transfer characteristics empowers intelligent choices regarding cost, power consumption, and weight. While most LED datasheets publish pertinent data that can be used to make these decisions, data may not be formatted in a way that is readily applicable to the chosen application. Optimal performance requires finding pertinent information from manufacturer’s LED datasheets and utilizing methods to capture, reformat and analyze the data.

Optimal operating point of an LED - [Link]

14 Feb 2015

by Henry Tonoyan @ htonoyan.blogspot.gr:

Last week I had the idea to create a last-minute valentine’s day gift for my girlfriend. I had a bunch of WS2812 LEDs from my previous endeavors and decided to make a big LED heart. These are a great choice because of the very minimal amount of components necessary: no I/O expanders, driving transistors or ICs necessary. Plus you just need one I/O line from your microcontroller to drive them.

Since they run off 5V, I planned to create a board that is powered from a wall-wart power supply. That way the board doesn’t even need a voltage regulator on it. I chose to use an ATMega48 because I have several from previous projects.

A Valentine’s Day Surprise - [Link]

12 Feb 2015

1pic-600x337

Markus Gritsch shared his WiFi LED light project in the dangerousprototypes forum:

I built a prototype for a WiFi controllable LED light, using the popular ESP8266 module running the NodeMCU firmware [1]. To allow controlling the WS2812B LEDs from Lua, I extended the firmware with a bit of C code

WiFi LED Light (ESP8266 + WS2812B + Lua) - [Link]

10 Feb 2015

F5C1IYZI5THVVXT.MEDIUM

by Rusivan @ instructables.com:

In this article I will try to tell you about the gift I made for my girlfriend!

The basis of the scheme is a microcontroller Atmega8, 1K resistor, selected in such a way as not to overload the microcontroller ports. SMD resistors and diodes, size 1206.

On the reverse side of the board, there are two batteries CR2032, two capacitors, voltage regulator LM7805, and the power button with latching.

DIY SMD LED heart - [Link]

2 Feb 2015

32x7display_small

by Phil Townshend @ edutek.ltd.uk :

A nifty 32×7 dot matrix display module, programmable via an RS232 serial port. There are preset inputs to display preset messages or simply control directly from a PC or laptop.

The principle of the display is based on our persistance of vision, the same thing that enables us to watch movies without seeing the flickering changes of frame. This display has 32 LEDs horizontally by 7 vertically. At any one time there is only ever one column of LEDs lit. The on’s and off’s are presented to the anode connections while the columns are enabled one by one. In this way a dot display of characters can be generated and when the speed is increased sufficiently, we stop seeing the flickering and see it as a steady display of dots.

LED Dot Matrix Display - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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