Home Blog  





21 Jan 2015

2765123_orig

Joe @ hobbyelectronics.net:

Here you will find complete construction details including circuit diagrams, PCB layouts and PIC firmware (and the source code). The code was written in Proton PIC BASIC but the good news is that there is now a free version of this compiler available for download; AMICUS18.

PIC Digital Thermometer & Clock - [Link]

17 Jan 2015

poe-light-intro11

by fabiobaltieri.com:

Sometimes you learn about an interesting IC and you build an entire circuit around it for no other good reason… This project is one of those!

The TPS2378 is an IEEE802.3at (Power over Ethernet) Powered Device controller, featuring internal pass MOSFET for loads up to 25.5W, Type 1 (a.k.a. 802.3af) compatibility and auxiliary power source support.

The IC is normally used together with a DC-DC step down regulator to power a network device (the PD) from a PoE compliant switch or injector (the PSE). A proper 802.3at device requires an isolated power supply with some safety characteristics that makes it not trivial to implement, and there are many DC-DC ICs with integrated PoE controller to make it easier, but as I wasn’t really interested in that part I just went for an easier project with just the PoE controller and some ballast… And what better ballast than some high power white LEDs!

Power over Ethernet Flashlight - [Link]

8 Jan 2015

article-2015january-silicon-carbide-substrate-fig2

by Steven Keeping @ digikey.com:

The majority of contemporary LEDs are constructed from a combination of Indium gallium nitride (InGaN) and sapphire substrate. The architecture works well and has allowed LED manufacturers to offer products exhibiting efficacies in excess of 150 lm/W. However, the architecture does have some drawbacks which have encouraged chipmakers to seek other options.

One commercially successful alternative is silicon carbide (SiC), and LEDs based on the substrate have been on the market for two years. Now a new generation of the technology has been released that promises to double the luminosity of the current brightest single LEDs and cut lighting fixture costs by 40 percent.

Silicon Carbide Substrate Boosts LED Luminosity - [Link]

6 Jan 2015

by fw.hardijzer.nl:

A few years ago I built a red-only 32 pixels high, 96 pixels wide LED Matrix, and due to all the positive responses I sought out to do it again the year after with a bigger better matrix. I did some research into affordable solutions, and as usual ended up with Chinese vendors. I got my hands on about 10 32×16 RGB LED panels with a 1cm pixel pitch, and a HUB75 connection, quite similar to the ADAFruit 32×16 matrix. ADAFruit had a bunch of information on them, and there are several other places where they’re being used, so I figured I’d give it a shot. I even bought a Digilent Basys 2 FPGA development board, as these boards are apparently best driven by an FPGA, and I was willing to pick that up.

96×48 full-color LED Matrix - [Link]


2 Jan 2015

FCCN9WQI4CMONNQ.MEDIUM

by batkin @ instructables.com:

Get in the mood with some fairly simple ATTiny85 based DIY color shifting lamps!

Color Changing Mood Lamp - [Link]

2 Jan 2015

FOCGKWZI4CMIYAO.MEDIUM

by Jan_Henrik @ instructables.com:

Hi, in this Instructable I want to show you how to create your own diffusor for a LED Matrix. To do this we will use a 3D printer and OpenSCAD. In this tutorial I will use a LOL-Shield by Jimmie ( http://jimmieprodgers.com/kits/lolshield/ ) also I will explain, how to design a diffusor for different matrix sizes and shapes.

As I recently was at the 31C3 in Hamburg i got a LOL-Shield from Jimmie. This shield is holding 126 LED´s which are Charlieplexed. After coding some animations and a game on it I thought that the LED´s where too bright. Because I wanted to keep the greyscale ( dimming ) of the matrix I decided to design and build a diffusor.

How to make a diffusor for your LED Matrix - [Link]

24 Dec 2014

LED_VU_Meter_(3)_th

LM3916 is a dedicated IC for VU LED meter. Unlike LM3915 which have 3dB step between voltage levels, the LM3916 have nonlinear steps: -20, -10, -7, -5, -3, -1, 0, +1, +2, +3db, just like old school analog VU meters. I saw in YouTube an interesting commercial LED VU meter, which imitates the needle movement in analog VU meters and I thought I can make a similar one. All I needed I found in the datasheet of LM3916.

LED VU Meter with LM3916 - [Link]

23 Dec 2014

prototype-600

Elmars writes:

If anybody is interesed, I have posed a follow up to this original post with a simple PWM LED driver, adding an ATtiny85 mCU. The post includes schematic, board layout and code for the ATtiny85. I hav tested the circuit up to 22 volts without a current limiting resistor. The FET only needs a small heat sink. Efficiency can be further improved by replacing the LM358 with an RC/LM741. The LM741 has a much sharper rise and fall time than the LM358 when run at 2KHz, resulting in the FET spending less time as a resistor. (during the slow ramp/fall the FET acts as a resistor, generating heat)

PWM Based LED Driver - [Link]

20 Dec 2014

by w2aew @ youtube.com

The Humanalight is a simple single-cell flashlight kit that will produce usable light, even from a “dead” AA battery. Circuits like these are often called a Joule Thief. This term has been applied to just about any circuit that allows you to boost the voltage from nearly depleted batteries for some other low-power application – such as lighting an LED. Strictly speaking, a Joule Thief circuit is an Armstrong style blocking oscillator that uses a bifilar wound transformer and relies on the saturation characteristics of the core to produce oscillation. This flashlight uses a simple two-transistor relation oscillator. A description of the circuit is given, and its operation is examined by viewing the waveforms on an oscilloscope. The proceeds from the sale of this kit benefit the “Ears To Our World” charity which provides self-powered radios and other technology to rural, impoverished and remote regions of the world.

Circuit Walkthrough: A single cell LED light - [Link]

19 Dec 2014

2014-18-11-eete-jh-everlight-bicolor

MUNICH — At Electronica last week, the LED manufacturer Everlight introduced what it claims to be the world’s first colour-temperature tunable LEDs in a simple chip on board (COB) package.
After brightness dimming, tunable color temperature is a feature that allows end users to tune the warmth of the light they receive. Typically, this feature is implemented through the use of multiple LEDs binned from cool white to warm white, behind a diffuser.

With its CHI3030 27V/29W series, Everlight claims to have a very compact solution, with LEDs packaged behind concentric layers of phosphors offering different color temperatures of white. Depending on how much warm white or cool white you choose to light up, you can get a precise color-temperature mix.

New LEDs offer tunable color temperature - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

Search Site | Advertising | Contact Us
Elektrotekno.com | Free Schematics Search Engine | Electronic Kits