Home Blog  





23 Nov 2011

circuitvalley.com writes:

This simple COM PORT based AVR atmega Programmer will allow you to painlessly transfer hex programs to most ATMEL AVR microcontrollers without sacrificing your budget and time. It is more reliable than most other simple AVR programmers available out there and can be built in very short amount of time.

AVR programmer consists of in-circuit serial programmer (dongle) and small pcb with a DIP socket where you can fit your microcontroller and have it quickly programmed.

AVR Serial Port Programmer - [Link]

22 Nov 2011

jumperone.com writes:

My parents growing their own organic food and they asked me to deal with winter temperatures problem in the storage room. It gets really cold here, in Ukraine. Some winters have even lower temperatures than -30°C (-22°F). So right now I designing a simple thermostat for keeping temperature at about 5-7 degrees C above zero. Plus right now I started to use my garage as a gym, so this thermostat would be handy there too.

It’s based around ATMEL AVR ATtiny2313 microcontroller, it will measure temperature using DS18B20 digital temperature sensor, and it has a 30A 240VAC relay to control heater.

ATtiny2313 – Based Thermostat Project - [Part1]+[Part2]+[Part3]

5 Nov 2011

If you like the AVR ATmega microprocessors, then the AVR XMEGA offer you even more reasons why to use them in your appliances.

Single-chip microprocessors AVR ATmega have gained a huge popularity all over the world. Because an excellent can also be even better, Atmel Corporation came to the market with the innovated series of these processors under marking XMEGA.

Generally known excellent properties of 8 bit RISC processors AVR Atmega, were further improved by developers in Atmel Corporation in this new line of 8/16 bit AVR XMEGA processors. That they succeeded, testifies this concise overview of innovations:

  • fast precise 12 bit AD converter (ADC)
  • fast 12 bit DA converter (DAC)
  • DMA controller for CPU independent data transfer
  • event system, most of peripherials and the DMA controller can use it, what significantly offloads CPU
  • ultra low power consumption – picoPOWER technology for a minimal consumption of 100nA in the Power down mode
  • EBI bus for RAM extension, peripherials (LCD) or memory-mapped devices
  • free Qtouch library for operation with capacitive touch panels
  • full speed USB connectivity without external crystal (at some models)
  • free AVR Software Framework including all common USB device classes
  • LCD display driver for a direct connection of LCD to processor
  • true 1.6V operation and speeds up to 32 MHz
  • AES, DES crypting protocols
  • 3-level interrupt controller (priority is freely user definable)
  • CRC modul (cyclic redundancy check) for data integrity check
  • RTC (real time clock) with optional battery backup system
  • analog comparators with adjustable hysteresis and propagation delay
  • external oscillator failure detection – in case of failure, CPU will start operation with the internal 2MHz oscillator
  • supply voltage 1.6 to 3.6V

Atmel AVR XMEGA will provide you eXtra more - [Link]

26 Oct 2011

RoboProgrammer – Automated AVR (or PIC etc) programmer – [via]

Recently, I needed to have a bunch of AVRs programmed… A big bunch… And as I am really lazy when it comes to do repeated procedures, I decided to make a robot to do this for me.

RoboProgrammer – Automated AVR (or PIC etc) programmer - [Link]


18 Oct 2011

ad7gd.net writes:

This little board demonstrates the capabilities of the MMA2260 +/- 1.5g X-Axis Micromachined Accelerometer. As you tip it back and forth, LEDs light up to show the magnitude and direction of the G force.

The MMA2260 is the fat SOIC 16 in the upper left, isolated so it could be cut off of the board and used as a breakout, keeping only a pin header and the recommended decoupling and output RC filter.

The microcontroller is a PIC16F628, which is entirely unsuited to this application, having no ADC. I failed to notice that, being quick to note “AN0″ on PORTA and slow to note that it was for a comparator, not an ADC. However, there is a builtin programmable voltage reference which was sufficiently accurate for lighting up 8 LEDs. I’m trying to get away from PICs, as AVRs have spoiled me with their GCC support, many registers and sane memory organization. Even on this project, which is only about 30 lines of C, most of the work was fighting SDCC bugs (failure to banksel, in this case). I’ve discovered a perverse pleasure in soldering down ICs to counteract my packrat nature. It did force me to put an ICSP header on, however.

MMA2260 Accelerometer Demo - [Link]

9 Oct 2011

Robot System Description :

  • 2 mobile phone vibrator
  • AVR ATtiny45 Microcontroller
  • IR RC5 Receiver for remote control
  • NiMH rechargeable battery
  • LED status indicator
  • Dimensions 12mm x 10mm x 18mm

Wheels less smallest Robot “ROBO-BijanMortazavi” - [Link]

2 Oct 2011

Blondihacks has developed a breadboard programming header for 8-Pin AVR microcontrollers called the Bread Head. [via]

This little guy was easy to make, and has been a real time saver when iterating on a breadboard. The trick is upside-down protoboard, and longer-than-usual headers! Read on to see how it’s built.

Bread Head - [Link]

26 Sep 2011

timnolan.com writes:

This is a project I did a couple of years back for a business friend of mine to automatically log all his phone calls into his computer. The hardware (pictured above) uses an microprocessor to monitor the phone calls (incoming and outgoing) and send the data out the serial port to be read by the computer.

The hardware is controlled by an Atmel AVR ATmega32 microprocessor. The processor uses optoisolators to see if the phone is off-hook and to check if the incoming line is ringing. If the phone is off-hook a DTMF decoding chip CM8870CP is used to decode the number that is dialed. If it is an incoming call an FSK decoding chip XR2211 is used to decode the Caller ID data.

Phone Call Logging Project - [Link]

17 Sep 2011

TUTORIAL: Arduino Hacks -Burning bootloader chips using an Arduino.

A lot of people start learning about microcontrollers with an Arduino but then want to build their own projects without having to sacrifice their dev board. Or maybe they want to make their own Arduino variant, that is compatible with the IDE. Either way, a common problem is how to burn the bootloader onto the fresh AVR chip. Since AVRs come blank, they need to be set up to be Arduino IDE compatible but to do that you need an AVR programmer (like the USBtinyISP).

The good news is that you can burn bootloader using your existing Arduino with only a little bit of work. There’s even a minitutorial on the arduino.cc site
This tutorial is an extention of that tutorial. First we’ll show how you can make a permanent bootloader-burner by soldering a 28-pin ZIF socket to a proto shield and use the PWM output line of the Arduino to generate a clock. This will let you ‘rescue’ many chips that have been set to the wrong type of oscillator, or change ones that are set from external oscillator (most Arduino bootloaders) to internal (such as the lilypad).

Arduino Hacks -Burning bootloader chips using an Arduino - [Link]

26 Aug 2011

This is just a quick video showing that you can power an AVR project from a fried servo or an old emergency cell phone charger.

Arduino Project Alternative Power Sources - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

Search Site | Advertising | Contact Us
Elektrotekno.com | Free Schematics Search Engine | Electronic Kits