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24 Feb 2015

ge-rfid-explosives

By David Szondy @ gizmag.com:

A global economy brings many benefits, but it also makes international terrorism extremely difficult to combat. With more goods passing through the world’s shipping terminals and airports than ever before, hunting explosives with large, static detectors or teams of inspectors armed with detecting devices and reagents is a bottleneck that increases the chances of evasion. To help US counterterrorism efforts, GE has developed RFID stickers that act as wireless, battery-free explosives detectors that can be placed almost anywhere.

GE RFID tech turns stickers into explosives detectors - [Link]

8 Jan 2015

obr1507_1

New version of a favorite RFID module ID12LA will enable you to implement RFID into your device even more easily thanks to a wide range of supply voltage.

Literally “globally known” with an integrated antenna – ID12 and its familiar like for example ID2 or ID20 have earned a big popularity thanks to a flawless usage and reliability. Perhaps the only disadvantage of this module was narrow range of operating supply voltage, what in praxis enabled only usage of 5V DC. New version – ID12LA solves also this small drawback and the new module works in a range of 2.8-5VDC. This also enable their usage even with a 3.3V logic and for example in battery operated devices (3-4x NiMH, or 1x Lithium cell, …) without necessity of DC converters or a precise voltage regulation.

The module ID12LA (range approx. 12cm), as well as ID20LA (range approx.16cm) are in our stable stock offer, similarly also the Mifare version (13,56 MHz) – ID20MFIA. In case, that you prefer the maximum range, it´s possible to use module ID2 supplied with an external antenna (range up to 30 cm).

Detailed information will provide you datasheets at particular types below the article.


RFID module ID12LA will also abide a lower voltage - [Link]

19 Dec 2014

ultralowpowe

by Hanne Degans @ phys.org:

At this week’s IEDM 2014, held in San Francisco, California, nanoelectronics research center imec demonstrated an ultra-low power RFID transponder chip. Operating at sub 1V voltage and realized in thin-film transistor technology (TFTs) on plastic film, the chip paves the way for universal sensing applications, such as item level RFID tagging, body area networks (BAN) and environmental monitoring, that require prolonged remote autonomy, and ultimate thinness, flexibility and robustness.

One of the major drivers of the semiconductor industry is the Internet of Things (IoT). Market studies envision a society where billions of autonomous sensor nodes are seamlessly integrated into objects, in the environment and on human bodies, operating independently for months, interacting with each other and connecting to the internet. This IoT is expected to improve and enhance daily-lives through smart houses and smart cars, personal health monitoring and much more.

Ultralow-power RFID transponder chip in thin-film transistor technology on plastic - [Link]

10 Dec 2014

mit_gas_detecting_sensor

by Nick Lavars:

While the stench of rotting food would cause you to stop from chowing down, chances are it became unfit for consumption some time before those funky aromas wafted through your nostrils. Chemists at MIT have been working on a wireless, inexpensive sensor that, among other things, identifies spoiled food early by detecting gases in the air. It then shares its data with a smartphone, potentially alerting users to that soon-to-be moldy fruit in the bottom of the fridge.

Wireless sensor alerts your smartphone as food begins to spoil - [Link]


13 Oct 2014

obr1510_p390

RFID keyboard emulators are able to significantly simplify tracking of goods.

“Replacement” of a keyboard in a form of an RFID module connected to a USB port works very simply – UID of every tag, which will appear in its range will send to a computer – the same way as if we typed it in by a keyboard. SL040A also enables to choose, whether we want the reader to send only data, or also a „CR“ character after every UID (as if an Enter key was hit). It means, that if we already have a software to type in open (for example Excel), the reader itself will fill the cell with data and move the cursor to another cell. SL040A is even able to read data (not only UID) from Mifare tags.

SL040A is also interesting by one feature – on a request from our company SOS electronic, the producer started to produce also the black version SL040A black. Thanks to the above-standard close relationship with the producers, we´re able to supply you even various special customized versions.
Detailed information will provide you the SL040A user manual.

SL040A will load it to you directly into a table sheet - [Link]

23 Sep 2014

DIY-RFID-Card-Lock-System

Shawn McCombs blogged about his DIY Arduino RFID card door lock system 100 cards build. [via]

DIY RFID card lock system - [Link]

19 Jul 2014

IMG_0358

by theifdark.blogspot.com:

These are the RFID readers I used. http://www.parallax.com/product/32390

Arduino RFID Card Door Lock System - [Link]

16 May 2014

accesscontrol

An Arduino-based RFID access control to open garage door using RFID by Jason Hamilton:

This is my Arduino-based project that allows you to use RFID for access control to open a door. The door can be anything that can be controlled by a relay. In my case it will be a garage door opener.
This is the initial prototype. Next I plan to build it on a prototype shield and then if put it on a PCB. The top section of components (Arduino and breadboard) will be placed inside the garage and the bottom section of components (LED, buzzer, NFC/RFID reader) will be placed outside (in a project box).

[via]

RFID access control for garage door - [Link]

20 Apr 2014

obr1510_p391

RFID keyboard emulators are able to significantly simplify tracking of goods.

“Replacemen” of a keyboard in a form of an RFID module connected to a USB port works very simply – UID of every tag, which will appear in its range will send to a computer – the same way as if we typed it in by a keyboard. SL040A also enables to choose, whether we want the reader to send only data, or also a „CR“ character after every UID (as if an Enter key was hit). It means, that if we already have a software to type in open (for example Excel), the reader itself will fill the cell with data and move the cursor to another cell. SL040A is even able to read data (not only UID) from Mifare tags.

SL040A is also interesting by one feature – on a request from our company SOS Electronic, the producer started to produce also the black version SL040A black.
Detailed information will provide you the SL040A user manual.

SL040A will load it to you directly into a table sheet - [Link]

18 Apr 2014

obr1507_1

New version of a favorite RFID module ID12LA will enable you to implement RFID into your device even more easily thanks to a wide range of supply voltage.

Literally “globally known” with an integrated antenna – ID12 and its familiar like for example ID2 or ID20 have earned a big popularity thanks to a flawless usage and reliability. Perhaps the only disadvantage of this module was narrow range of operating supply voltage, what in praxis enabled only usage of 5V DC. New version – ID12LA solves also this small drawback and the new module works in a range of 2.8-5VDC. This also enable their usage even with a 3.3V logic and for example in battery operated devices (3-4x NiMH, or 1x Lithium cell, …) without necessity of DC converters or a precise voltage regulation.

The module ID12LA (range approx. 12cm), as well as ID20LA (range approx.16cm) are in our stable stock offer, similarly also the Mifare version (13,56 MHz) – ID20MFIA. In case, that you prefer the maximum range, it´s possible to use module ID2 supplied with an external antenna (range up to 30 cm).

Detailed information will provide you datasheets at particular types below the article.

RFID module ID12LA will also abide a lower voltage … – [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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