Tag Archives: ESP32

HeartyPatch – Open source ECG patch with Wifi

An ECG patch with HRV monitoring that’s open source, affordable, and Wi-Fi/Bluetooth connected.

HeartyPatch is a completely open source, single-lead, ECG-HR wearable patch with HRV (Heart Rate Variability) analysis. It is based on the popular ESP32 system-on-a-chip. By using low-cost, highly-integrated components, we are able to keep the BOM’s cost low, while the simplicity of the circuit design means future expansion will be easier. HeartyPatch can be used both as a lifestyle device for managing fitness and stress as well as for diagnostics and medical research, with the potential for even more interesting applications.

HeartyPatch – Open source ECG patch with Wifi – [Link]

ESP32 Web Server Tutorial with a BME280 Sensor

Our friends at educ8s.tv uploaded a new tutorial on their youtube channel. It’s about an ESP32 web server along with MBE280 sensor.

Welcome to another ESP32 video tutorial! In this video, we are going to build a simple HTTP Web Server on an ESP32 board with a BME280 sensor. We are also going to learn how to make some requests to it using a web browser. There is a lot to cover, so let’s get started!

ESP32 Web Server Tutorial with a BME280 Sensor – [Link]

ESP32 WiFi Weather Station with a Nextion Display

Our friends at educ8s.tv uploaded a new video about how to build a ESP32 Wifi enabled weather station:

In this video, we are going to make this. It is yet another weather station project I know, but this time we use the new ESP32 chip! We also use the new BME280 sensor which measures the temperature, the humidity, and the barometric pressure. When we power up the project, it connects to the WiFi network, and it is going to retrieve the weather forecast for my location from the openweathermap website. Then it will display the forecast on this 3.2” Nextion Touch Display along with the readings from the sensor! The readings are updated every two seconds and the weather forecast every hour! As you can see, in this project we use the latest technologies available to a maker today! If you are a DIY veteran, you can build this project in five minutes. If you are a beginner, you have to watch a couple of videos before attempting this project. You can watch those videos by clicking on the cards that will appear during the video. Let’s start!

ESP32 WiFi Weather Station with a Nextion Display – [Link]

Decoding and Encoding JSON with Arduino or ESP8266

In this blog post you’re going to learn how to decode (parse a JSON string) and encode (generate a JSON string) with the ArduinoJson library using the Arduino with the Ethernet shield. This guide also works with the ESP8266 and ESP32 Wi-Fi modules with small changes.

Decoding and Encoding JSON with Arduino or ESP8266 – [Link]

ESP32 NTP OLED clock

@ blog.danman.eu build a OLED display NTP clock and document his process on his blog:

As a first project with my new ESP32 module with OLED display I chose to build OLED clock. I thought I’ll just find some existing code, upload it and it’s done. There are a few such projects for ESP8266 in NodeMCU. So I started with NodeMCU upload.

ESP32 NTP OLED clock – [Link]

ESP32 Monster board, Ether, CAN, OLED all in one

ESP32 monster board with Ether(LAN8720A), CAN bus(SN65HVD232DR), OLED(SH1106), Lipo-charger and FTDI interface @ tindie.com

ESP32 Monster board, Ether, CAN, OLED all in one – [Link]

ESP32 Web Server – Arduino IDE

Rui @ randomnerdtutorials.com tipped us with his latest project. He writes:

In this project you’ll create a standalone web server with an ESP32 that can toggle two LEDs using the Arduino IDE programming environment. If you want to learn more about the ESP32 dev board, read my Getting Started Guide with ESP32.

ESP32 Web Server – Arduino IDE – [Link]

10km ESP32 WiFi Using Directional Antenna

[Jeija] was playing with some ESP32s and in true hacker fashion, he wondered how far he could pull them apart and still get data flowing. His video answer to that question covers the Friis equation and has a lot of good examples of using the equation, decibels, and even a practical example that covers about 10km. You can see the video below.

Of course, to get that kind of range you need a directional antenna. To avoid violating regulations that control transmit power, he’s using the antenna on the receiving end. That also means he had to hack the ESP32 WiFi stack to make the device listen only on one side. The hack involves putting the device in promiscuous mode and only monitoring the signals being sent. You can find the code involved on GitHub (complete with a rickrolling application).

Of course, antennas are nothing new–look at all the Pringle can antennas we’ve seen in the past. However, the use of a long range receive-only module is interesting and we can see this technique having applications to remote drone video or telemetry and — of course — wardriving. If you don’t have a big boss antenna lying around, you might try some duct tape. If you want a more detailed refresher on decibels, we did that last month.

Source: Hackaday

Creating a Smart Water Sensor with the ESP32 Thing

Alex the Giant @ sparkfun.com has a tutorial on how to build smart and connected water sensor using ESP32. He writes:

For this project, you can use either the ESP8266 Thing, or the ESP32 Thing. One of the many improvements made on the ESP32 is the capacitive touch circuitry built in to ten of the IO pins (we can see the pins capable of capacitive touch in the datasheet below). It should be noted though, that Touch1 cannot be used as capacitive touch sensor because of the pull-up resistor connected to GPIO pin 0. With the capacitive touch, we’ll be able to sense water with just two pins; the first will be connected directly to a capacitive touch pin, and the second will be connected to ground.

Creating a Smart Water Sensor with the ESP32 Thing – [Link]

Arduino-Programmable ESP32 Development Board

Ezsbc, an American embedded control solutions retailer, had produced a new development board that simplifies working with ESP32 module and makes it programmable via USB using the Arduino IDE.

The ESP32 is a low cost, ultra low power microcontroller with integrated Wi-Fi & dual-mode Bluetooth, which employs a dual-core Tensilica Xtensa LX6 microprocessor. ESP32 is created and developed by Espressif Systems for mobile devices, wearable electronics and IoT applications. It is a successor to the ESP8266 microcontroller.

Other than the ESP32 module, the board has an FTDI FT231XS USB to Serial converter, a 3.3V LDO, reset and flash switches and a multi color LED. The module can be programmed directly from the Arduino environment with 921600 bps upload speed.

It supports auto-download and will automatically be set in download mode by the downloader. Once the download is complete the board will be reset, just like a normal Arduino board.

Features of the ESP32 board:

  • 240 MHz dual core Tensilica LX6 microcontroller with 600 DMIPS
  • Integrated 520 KB SRAM
  • Integrated 802.11BGN HT40 Wi-Fi transceiver, baseband, stack and LWIP
  • Integrated dual mode Bluetooth (classic and BLE)
  • 16 MByte flash
  • 2.2V to 3.6V operating voltage
  • On-board PCB antenna
  • 3 x UARTs, including hardware flow control
  • 3 x SPI
  • 2 x I2S
  • 12 x ADC input channels
  • 2 x DAC
  • 2 x I2C
  • PWM/timer input/output available on every GPIO pin
  • SDIO master/slave 50 MHz
  • Supports external SPI flash up to 16 MB
  • SD-card interface support

The board is available for $17 on tindie store. Datasheet, documentation, and schematics are also available there.