Tag Archives: microcontrollers

Ultra-low-power MSP430 microcontrollers

Developers can implement simple sensing functions with TI’s lowest-cost microcontroller family

Texas Instruments (TI) on November 10, unveiled its lowest-cost ultra-low-power MSP430 microcontrollers (MCUs) for sensing applications. Developers can now implement simple sensing solutions through a variety of integrated mixed-signal features in this family of MSP430 value line sensing MCUs, available for as low as US$0.25 in high volumes. Additions to the family include two new entry-level devices and a new TI LaunchPad development kit for quick and easy evaluation.

Features and benefits of TI’s MSP430 value line sensing MCUs

  • Developers now have the flexibility to customize 25 common system-level functions including timers, input/output expanders, system reset controllers, electrically erasable programmable read-only memory (EEPROM) and more, using a library of code examples.
  • A common core architecture, a tools and software ecosystem, and extensive documentation including migration guides make it easy for developers to choose the best MSP430 value line sensing MCU for each of their designs.
  • Designers can scale from the 0.5-KB MSP430FR2000 MCU to the rest of the MSP430 sensing and measurement MCU portfolio for applications that require up to 256 KB of memory, higher performance or more analog peripherals.

The new MSP430FR2000 and MSP430FR2100 MCUs (with 0.5 KB and 1 KB of memory, respectively) and the new development kit join the MSP430 value line sensing family which includes the MSP430FR2111, MSP430FR2311, MSP430FR2033, MSP430FR2433 and MSP430FR4133 microcontroller families and their related development tools and software.

Pricing and availability

Developers can purchase the value line sensing portfolio through the TI store, priced as low as US$0.29 in 1,000-unit quantities and US$0.25 in higher volumes. Additionally, the new MSP430FR2433 LaunchPad development kit (MSP-EXP430FR2433) is available from the TI store and authorized distributors for US$9.99. Today through Dec. 31, 2017, the TI store is offering the LaunchPad kit for a promotional price of US$4.30.

For more information visit: www.ti.com/ValueLine-pr

XOD, Visual Coding For Microcontrollers

XOD is a new visual programming language for microcontrollers launched now. Pronounced [ksəud], this programming language idea was inspired by vvvv,  a hybrid visual/textual live-programming environment for easy prototyping and development which is designed to facilitate the handling of large media environments with physical interfaces, real-time motion graphics, audio and video that can interact with many users simultaneously.

Like Code, But Better

The basic unit of this language called node, a block that represents either some physical device like a sensor, motor, or relay, or some operation such as addition, comparison, or text concatenation. Each node has its inputs, outputs, and a function. Once you link the nodes together you will define a behavior. XOD will protect you from creating programs don’t compile, by making sure all nodes linked will give the behavior desired.

If it links, it’s likely going to work“.

Fortunately, you won’t need Firmata or another controller PC to export the code that suits your platform. XOD will export for you the needed native code and run it directly. It is already compatible with Arduino, Raspberry Pi and other popular development boards.

XOD gives you the possibility to build your own nodes by merging some nodes together, making it simpler and faster. You can share these nodes with the community and search for trendy ones too once the platform is live.

XOD includes plenty of nodes in their platform. The team believes they are good enough to start your projects just like normal programming!

27 days left for Alpha version although you can still get early access to the XOD private alpha by signing up at www.xod.io!

Cortex-M-based MCUs Set Pace For Automotive Design

AUTomotive Open System Architecture (AUTOSAR) is a worldwide automotive consortium trying to create and establish an open and standardized software architecture for automotive electronic control units (ECUs). However, as is always the case with industry consortiums and standards, they are not endorsed by all interested parties, and, to complicate matters even more, not all applications require AUTOSAR.

With this in mind NXP has launched its S32K1 family of scalable ARM Cortex-M devices together with a suite of automotive grade tools and software. Initially the family will span 128KB-2MB of flash memory. All family members include ISO CAN FD, CSEc hardware security, ASIL-B support and ultra-low-power performance. Check out the demo video.

Block Diagram

In applications where the use of AUTOSAR is not mandated, the S32K platform provides a path for self-development with a free-of-charge, pre-qualified, automotive-grade software development kit (SDK) that enables rapid prototyping with simple drag and drop functionality. For AUTOSAR applications, NXP’s MCAL and OS support has been expanded with new Complex Device Drivers (CDD) and a new S32K starter kit is available free of charge for evaluation.

You can learn more about NXP’s S32K1 product line and the suite of automotive-grade tools and software that support ARM Cortex-based MCUs at the official website.

Source: Elektor