Tag Archives: Raspberry Pi

IOT-GATE-RPi: mini-PC/gateway build on the RPi CM3

CompuLab introduces IOT-GATE-RPi – a miniature, low cost industrial IoT computer, built around the Raspberry Pi 3 Compute Module.

Targeting IoT connectivity and control applications, IOT-GATE-RPi features a variety of wireless and wired interfaces. All-metal, rugged housing and support for wide temperature range of -40C to 80C make IOT-GATE-RPi a versatile solution for installation in harsh environments. IOT-GATE-RPi has been designed for full compatibility with Raspberry Pi software and runs standard Raspberry Pi OS images.

Thanks to its rich software eco-system, Raspberry Pi is widely used by IoT system designers for software development and quick proof-of-concept. IOT-GATE-RPi turns Raspberry Pi into an industrial-grade IoT computer, allowing fast and seamless transition from a Raspberry Pi proto-type to mass-production deployment.

Designed for IoT applications

IOT-GATE-RPi expands standard Raspberry Pi functionality with additional features necessary for typical industrial IoT systems:

  • Built-in 3G/LTE cellular modem with on-board SIM socket
  • Dual Ethernet ports
  • Up-to 64GB of on-board, soldered eMMC storage
  • RTC with battery back-up
  • RS485 and CAN bus interfaces

IOT-GATE-RPi functionality can be further extended with Raspberry Pi HAT expansion boards.

[via]

IOT-GATE-RPi: mini-PC/gateway build on the RPi CM3 – [Link]

Google offers AI vision kit for Raspberry Pi owners

Google’s Vision Kit lets you build your own computer-vision system for $45 along with your own Raspberry Pi.

The company has now launched the AIY (AI yourself) Vision Kit that lets you turn Raspberry Pi equipment into an image-recognition device. The kit is powered by Google’s TensorFlow machine-learning models and will soon gain an accompanying Android app for controlling the device.

According to Google, Vision Kit features “on-device neural network acceleration”, allowing a Raspberry Pi-based box to do computer vision without processing in the cloud. The AIY Voice Kit relies on the cloud for natural-language processing.

Google offers AI vision kit for Raspberry Pi owners – [Link]

Node-RED with Raspberry Pi Camera

In this project we’re going to take photos with Node-RED using the Raspberry Pi Camera Module V2. We’re using this application to monitor our 3D printer. You can edit the flow and the template to use the camera in your own projects whether you want to monitor your lab, door or 3D printer.

Node-RED with Raspberry Pi Camera – [Link]

OwnCloud on Raspberry Pi

Install OwnCloud on Raspberry Pi And make your own cloud server.

OwnCloud set on Raspberry Pi can be a good example of smart cloud storage. A cloud storage is a cloud computing model in which the data is stored on remote servers and maintained by a cloud storage service provider. This allows users to customize their data and share it with friends and business partners over the Internet.

OwnCloud as cloud storage server is a great opportunity, especially for those who would like to use OwnCloud on Raspberry Pi (or any other ARM device).

OwnCloud on Raspberry Pi – [Link]

More IoT with Compute Module 3 and Ubuntu Core OS

Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu, announced recently that its IoT OS, Ubuntu Core, is available on the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 – the general-purpose compute product from the Raspberry Pi Foundation. This OS, the smallest Ubuntu ever, is the perfect host operating system for IoT devices and large-scale cloud container deployments. Actually, the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 (CM3), is a micro-version of the Raspberry Pi 3. With its new features, it provides a simple and affordable single board computer.

In fact, this module is based on the Raspberry Pi 3 hardware, providing twice the RAM and roughly 10x the CPU performance of the original Module, launched in 2014. Even though CM3 is replacing the original Compute Module, but CM1 is still compatible with the new Compute Module IO Board V3, and remains available for sale.

CM3 takes care of the complexity of routing out the pins, the high speed RAM interface and core power supply. Also, it allows a simple carrier board to provide what is necessary for external interfaces and form factor. The module uses a standard DDR2 SODIMM form factor, sockets by several manufacturers, are easily available, and are inexpensive.

Software Defined Everything?

As a vision for Canonical, The CM3 with Ubuntu Core allows developers to create new IoT products and devices. As well as offering a potentially smaller and more efficient replacement for some devices that contain larger Raspberry Pi boards.

“Gaining official support for Ubuntu Core is highly significant for our Compute Module 3. It opens up a huge community of developers keen to leverage Ubuntu’s particular advantages in the IoT world; its resource-efficient footprint, versatility, and industry leading security benefits,” says Eben Upton, CEO at Raspberry Pi.

Finally, more comprehensive information on the Compute Modules is available in the this hardware documentation, and includes a datasheet and schematics. In addition, you can check this step-by-step tutorial to install Core OS on your Compute Module 3 by Ubuntu Developer.

AutoPi makes your car intelligent

What if your car was intelligent like KITT in the 80’s TV show Knight Rider? With AutoPi all cars become intelligent and can have eyes, ears and a voice.

Until now all functionality and data from cars have belonged only to the manufacturers. With AutoPi the car owners can, as a cooperating community, take control over their own vehicles and data without having to be an engineer.

AutoPi.io is a Danish startup company and they have just launched their open Internet-of-Things platform for cars. It is the first extendable maker platform for cars, built on the revolutionary Raspberry Pi mini computer.

In less than 24 hours, their Kickstarter campaign has raised more than $20.000:

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/autopi/autopiio-the-first-extendable-iot-platform-for-you

A Compact Camera Using Raspberry Pi A+ And Adafruit TFT Display

PiJuice at instructables.com designed an interesting compact camera project with raspberry pi. Raspberry Pi A+ is used in this project as it is the cheapest and smallest available Raspberry Pi. The real challenge in this kind of portable Pi projects is powering the Raspberry Pi. This issue is solved using PiJuice—an all in one battery module for the Raspberry Pi.

Required Parts

Required parts to make Raspberry Pi compact camera
Required parts to make Raspberry Pi compact camera

Set Up The Raspberry Pi

Download the latest version of the Raspbian image from the Raspberry Pi Website and burn it on your blank SD card. You can use win32DiskImager or your favorite software to get the job done. Now, you need to install the drivers for the TFT screen by running the DIY installer script, explained on the Adafruit page. Connect the TFT to the Raspberry Pi, attach the PiJuice with a charged battery, and switch it on. Your screen now should display boot up messages.

Connect The Camera

Insert the ribbon cable of your camera module properly ensuring that the blue side of the ribbon is facing away from the HDMI port. Now, go to the terminal and type the following command,

sudo raspi-config

Enable the camera in the menu and then reboot the Pi. The camera should work properly after a successful reboot. To test the camera, enter the following command:

raspistill -o pic.jpg

This will take a snap and save it in the /home/pi directory.

Connect A Push Button

You need a push button to simulate a shutter action. Locate the pin 17 on the GPIO breakout on the top of the TFT screen. Now, solder two wires to the terminals of the push button. You can either solder a right angle header to the pin 17 or you can directly solder one wire from push button to that pin. There is a pad labeled WP on the board. It is actually connected to the ground. Solder another wire from the push button to this pad.

Install And Test The PiCam Software

To install the software, the Raspberry Pi must be connected to the internet. Enter the commands given below to download and install PiCam.

sudo apt-get install git-core
sudo mkdir PiCam
cd /PiCam
git clone git://github.com/pijuice/PiCam.git

Once the software has been downloaded, navigate to the PiCam directory using the command:

cd /picam

You can run it by typing the command:

sudo python picam.py

Now, you can take pictures by simply pressing the push button. Once the button is pressed the picture will be taken. Once the captured image gets loaded, your photograph will be displayed.

Taking photograph with Raspberry Pi compact camera
Taking photograph with Raspberry Pi compact camera

Conclusion

Your Raspberry Pi camera is ready now. If you want to make it even more compact as well as portable, grab the official laser-cut compact camera case from the Kickstarter page by pre-ordering a Maker Kit. You can also build your own simple chassis for housing the camera.

Temperature Controlled Stair lights With Raspberry Pi

Ever wished to know the temperature on your way to breakfast after waking up in the morning? Now you can find it out in a fascinating way as Lorraine Underwood at The MagPi magazine designed a temperature controlled colorful stair lights system with raspberry pi. In this tutorial, we’re going to discuss that project.

Temperature Controlled Stair Lights
Temperature Controlled Stair Lights

Required Parts

  • Strip of 50 neopixels
  • A 5V power source for the lights
  • 2 x terminal blocks
  • 2 x male to female jumper cables
  • A raspberry pi zero with SD card with Raspian installed
  • Power supply for the Pi zero (temporary)

 

Make sure that the raspberry pi power supply gives exactly 5 volts and is capable of outputting 2.5A current.

Make The Circuit

At first, examine your LED strip and find out which pin is what. Connect two wires to GND, one wire to Din, and one wire to +5V pin. Now, connect the 5V pin to the “+” terminal of the female jack and GND pin to the “-” terminal. Tighten the screws of the terminal block to ensure that the wires are connected properly.

Connect the Din and GND pin of the LEDstrip to the GPIO 18 and GND of the Raspberry Pi respectively, using the male-to-female jumper wires. Please note that Broadcom numbering (BCM) is used in this tutorial, not the physical numbering. It will look like below after making the connections:

Connecting Wires To The LED Strip
Connecting Wires To The LED Strip

Set Up The Weather API

You need to set up a weather API in order to get the outside temperature in your area. In this tutorial, forecast.io is used as they allow you to make 1000 queries per day free of cost. Go to forecast.io and select Developer option. Then, click sign up to create a developer account and provide your email address. A secret key will be sent to that address. Store it securely as you’ll need in the next step.

Prepare The Raspberry Pi

At first, you need to install the Adafruit NeoPixel library rpi_ws281x. Go here and follow the instructions to install the required files on your raspberry pi. Once installed, navigate to the examples folder, run any script you wish, and check if the LED strip is functioning properly.

Now, save the below script as stair_lights.py in the Raspberry Pi:

#!/usr/bin/python3
from urllib.request import urlopen
import json
import time
from neopixel import *

apikey="get_your_own_key" # get a key from https://developer.forecast.io/register
# Latitude & longitude - current values are Lancaster University
lati="54.005546"
longi="-2.784876"

LED_COUNT = 50 # Number of LED pixels.
LED_PIN = 18 # GPIO pin connected to the pixels (must support PWM!).
LED_FREQ_HZ = 800000 # LED signal frequency in hertz (usually 800khz)
LED_DMA = 5 # DMA channel to use for generating signal (try 5)
LED_BRIGHTNESS = 8 # Set to 0 for darkest and 255 for brightest
LED_INVERT = False # True to invert the signal (when using NPN transistor level shift)

def color(strip, color, start, end): 
 for i in range(start, end+1):
 strip.setPixelColor(i, color)
 strip.show() 
 
strip = Adafruit_NeoPixel(LED_COUNT, LED_PIN, LED_FREQ_HZ, LED_DMA, LED_INVERT, LED_BRIGHTNESS)
strip.begin()

count = 0
try:
 while True: 
 #get the data from the api website
 url="https://api.forecast.io/forecast/"+apikey+"/"+lati+","+longi+"?units=si"
 meteo=urlopen(url).read()
 meteo = meteo.decode('utf-8')
 weather = json.loads(meteo)

currentTemp = weather['currently']['temperature']

#negative number will always be on 
 color(strip, Color(0, 0, 255), 0,7) # Blue
 
 #what's the temp?
 if currentTemp > 0:
 color(strip, Color(75, 75, 255), 8, 15) # light Blue
 if currentTemp > 5:
 color(strip, Color(0, 255, 0), 16, 23) # dark Green
 if currentTemp > 10:
 color(strip, Color(75, 255, 75), 24, 31) # light Green
 if currentTemp > 15:
 color(strip, Color(255, 100, 0), 32, 39) # yellow 
 elif currentTemp > 20:
 color(strip, Color(255, 50, 0), 40, 47) #orange 
 elif currentTemp > 25:
 color(strip, Color(255, 0, 0), 48, 50) # Red 
 #check every 5 minutes (change to crontab)
 time.sleep(300)
 
except KeyboardInterrupt:
 print("Exit")
 color(strip, Color(0,0,0), 0, 49)

Enter your own secret key in the apikey field on the 7th line. Also, replace the longitude and latitude values on line 9 and 10 with the coordinates of your area. Now save the file and you are almost done.

To start the script automatically after each reboot and check the outside temperature every five minutes, set up a cron task by entering the following command:

sudoE crontab -e

A file will be opened and add the following lines at the end of the file:

*/5 * * * * /usr/bin/python3 /home/pi/stair_lights.py
@reboot /usr/bin/python3 /home/pi/stair_lights.py

Save the file and exit.

The Color Scheme

The following table shows which color represents which temperature range. You can modify the script to change the current color scheme.

Temperature (°C) Lights (Nos) Color
 0 – 4  9 – 16 Light Blue
 5 – 9 17 – 24 Dark Green
 10 – 14 25 – 32 Light Green
 15 – 19 33 – 40 Yellow
 19 – 24  41 – 48 Orange
 25+  48 – 50 Red

 

Raspberry Pi ATX Power Board

Control 16 Relays with your Pi, supplying 12V to 16 DC jacks. All powered from and ATX Power Supply, with sensor support on board. You can find more details on the author’s website. by Rodney Balent @ kickstarter.com:

I started out with the simple goal of wanting to automate a few things around the home starting with my vertical garden using a Raspberry Pi.

With that goal in mind I decided to make a 16 bay relay board so I could control as many devices as possible from a single point. It was then I found how much space this would take up, and how long it would take to wire up and it became impractical.

So the next logical step was to look into making my own PCB. I noticed that virtually all the devices I wanted to control ran on 12V, I also noticed how many spare ATX power supplies I had lying around and the gears in my head started turning.

Banana Pi BPI-M2 Berry, A Quad Core Single-Board Computer

Raspberry Pi is a powerful on-board computer series launched few years ago. Many similar boards appeared providing cheaper price or more features. The Chinese company “SinoVoIP” is manufacturing its own board “Banana Pi“, and recently they unveiled a new board that is similar to Raspberry Pi 3 and called “BPI-M2 Berry“.

The BPi Berry features the Allwinner R40 32-bit quad-core ARM Cortex-A7 CPU giving it the same power of Raspberry Pi 2 version 1.0. It is similar to the BPi M2 Ultra that was released a few months back, but with 1 GB DDR3 SRAM instead of 2 GB and without eMMC Flash Memory. BPi Berry has a different size of other BPi boards, making it the first RPi size-compatible BPi with the same size and connector placement as the RPi3.

Banana Pi BPI-M2 Berry specifications:

  • SoC – Allwinner V40 quad Core ARM Cortex A7 processor with ARM Mali-400MP2 GPU
  • System Memory – 1G DDR3 SDRAM
  • Storage – micro SD slot, SATA interface
  • Connectivity – 1x Gigabit Ethernet port, 802.11 b/g/n WiFi and Bluetooth 4.0 (AP6212 module)
  • Video Output – HDMI 1.4 port up to 1080p60, 4-lane MIPI DSI display connector
  • Audio I/O – HDMI, 3.5mm headphone jack, built-in microphone
  • USB – 4x USB 2.0 host ports, 1x micro USB OTG port
  • Camera – CSI camera connector
  • Expansion – 40-pin Raspberry Pi compatible header with GPIOs, I2C, SPI, UART, ID EEPROM, 5V, 3.3V, GND signals.
  • Debugging – 3-pin UART for serial console
  • Misc – Reset, power, and u-boot buttons
  • Power Supply – 5V via micro USB port; AXP221s PMIC
  • Dimensions – 85mm x 56mm

Compared with RPi3, BPi Berry adds a SATA port that allows the connection of an external hard disk or DVD/CDROM drive, which is convenient for applications that require lots of storage or faster throughput compared to USB memory sticks. Also there are differences in camera and display connectors, they are in the same place but with different sizes and the SD card slot is wider too.

BPi M2 Berry is available for about $45. For more details about the board visit the official announcement and take a look at this review on elektor.