Tag Archives: Raspberry Pi

Raspberry Pi Zero PiE-Ink Name Badge

Maker Josh King has introduced the PiE-Ink Name Badge.

Introducing the PiE-Ink Name Badge – a Raspberry Pi Zero Python Powered E-Ink Linux Name Badge (what a mouthful!). A full wearable linux computer system on your chest!

Raspberry Pi Zero PiE-Ink Name Badge – [Link]

How to Access the Raspberry Pi GUI with a Remote Desktop Connection

circuitbasics.com has a tutorial on how to access Raspberry Pi with a remote desktop connection.

In the previous post, we learned how to set up a WiFi dongle and access the Raspbian command prompt via an SSH client called PuTTY. PuTTY is a great application for accessing the command line in Raspbian from another computer, but you can’t use it to access the Raspbian desktop (GUI). In order to access the Raspbian GUI from another computer, we need to configure it to work with a remote desktop application. This will allow us to access our Raspberry Pi desktop (or the command line) from anywhere in the world as long as we have a computer with an internet connection.

How to Access the Raspberry Pi GUI with a Remote Desktop Connection – [Link]

OpenScope, An Open Source Multi-function Board

In order to make learning and using electronics accessible to all, Digilent Inc., an electrical engineering products company, had created a new powerful and affordable tool for  beginners and enthusiasts. ‘OpenScope’ is an instrumentation device that empowers makers, hobbyists, engineers, and new learners to design and debug their most innovative products.

OpenScope is a portable multi-function programmable instrumentation module, that connects with computer through WiFi or USB to allow acquiring, analysing, visualising, and controlling signals from circuits, sensors, and other electronic devices. It can also be programmed to work as a standalone development board, like Arduino and Raspberry Pi, with high-speed precision analog and digital I/O.

WaveForms Live is a free, open-source, JavaScript-based software that runs in a browser. It comes with OpenScope and is used for configuring it to work as an oscilloscope, a function generator, a logic analyzer, a power supply, or a data logger.

OpenScope can be used to make real time monitoring and troubleshooting projects, to build long-term capturing and calculating IoT devices, and also to gain a deeper understanding of electronics through visualizing what’s happening inside of the circuit.

The core of OpenScope is the Microchip PIC32MZ Processor, a 32-bit MCU based on the MIPS processor, clocked at 200MHz with 2 MB flash memory and up to 512KB high-speed SRAM. It is placed on OpenScope’s top face with a WiFi module, MicroUSB port for power and programming, programming headers, 30 pins, two input channels, gain select multiplexers, with led and buttons.

 

OpenScope Features:

  • 2 12-bit scope channels at 2 MHz bandwidth and 6.25 MS/sec sampling rate.
  • 1 MHz function generator output with 10 MS/sec update rate.
  • 10 programmable digital I/O pins .
  • Up to 50 mA ±4 volts programmable power supply.
  • On-Board WiFi
  • Reprogrammable through Arduino IDE and Microchip MPLabX

$14,000 has been reached since launching the Kickstarter campaign yesterday. You can reserve your own OpenScope for $80 and also an optional 3D printed case is available for $25. According to the project timeline, early shipping will begins in April 2017.

CM3, Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3

Raspberry Pi launched the new version of its compute module providing twice the RAM and roughly 10x the CPU performance of the original Module. Compute Module 3 (CM3) fits into a standard DDR2 SODIMM socket and provides the same basic processing capabilities as the Raspberry Pi 3. It is designed for professional engineers who would like to develop embedded systems.

CM3 comes in two versions. The first is the “Standard CM3” that features a 64-bit Broadcom BCM2837 application processor, built around an ARM Cortex-A53 quad-core processor running at up to 1.2 GHz, with 1GByte RAM, the same as Pi3, and 4 Gbytes of on-module eMMC flash. The second version is “Compute Module 3 Lite (CM3L)” which still has the same BCM2837 and 1Gbyte of RAM, but brings the SD card interface to the Module pins so a user can wire this up to an eMMC or SD card of their choice.

 

Back side of CM3 (left) and CM3L (right)

 

“The idea of the Compute Module was to provide an easy and cost-effective route to producing customised products based on the Pi hardware and software platform. The thought was to provide the ‘team in a garage’ with easy access to the same technology as the big guys.”

Raspberry Pi also released an updated version of the Compute Module IO Board V3 (CMIO3). This board provides the necessary power to the module and gives you the ability to program the module’s flash memory or use an SD card for the lite version, to access the processor interfaces through pin headers and flexi connectors. In addition, it provides the necessary HDMI and USB connectors.

This board provides both a starting template for those who want to design with the Compute Module and a quick way to start experimenting with the hardware, and building and testing a system, before going to the expense of fabricating a custom board. The CMIO3 can accept an original Compute Module, CM3, or CM3L.

CM3 and CM3L are priced at $30 and $25 respectively, and this price applies to any order size. The original Compute Module is also reduced to $25. You can order your own from Raspberry Pi partners, element14 (or Farnell UK) and RS Components. The partners are also providing full development kits, which include all you need to get started designing with the Compute Module 3.

ZeroPhone – a Raspberry Pi smartphone

Arsenijs build a Pi-powered open-source mobile phone (that you can assemble for 50$ in parts).

Currently, it costs about 50$ in parts, and all the parts are available on eBay. No BGA or other difficultly solderable ICs are used (with the obvious exception of Pi Zero). User interface is written using Python, and there’s a phone-tailored UI framework in the works (so far, it uses pyLCI for interfacing). However, even current state of it is further that other projects have come.

ZeroPhone – a Raspberry Pi smartphone – [Link]

How to Setup an LCD Touchscreen on the Raspberry Pi

circuitbasics.com has a tutorial on how to setup a LCD screen for Raspberry Pi.

In this tutorial, I’ll walk you through the process of installing an LCD touchscreen on the Raspberry Pi, step by step. Many LCD touchscreens for the Raspberry Pi include an image file that you can write to your SD card and get up and running pretty quickly.

How to Setup an LCD Touchscreen on the Raspberry Pi – [Link]

Control a stepper motor using Raspberry Pi

Here is a nice tutorial @ raspberrypi.org on how to control a DC motor using Python.

In this guide, you’ll be controlling two motors from your Raspberry Pi using Python on the desktop. First, it’s best just to learn how to control the motor. Then, once you have it working, you could easily use your code to drive a Raspberry Pi-powered robot by detaching the monitor, mouse, and keyboard and building a robot around a chassis.

Control a stepper motor using Raspberry Pi – [Link]

How to Connect to a Raspberry Pi with an Ethernet Cable

circuitbasics.com show us how to connect Rasperry Pi using Ethernet cable.

If you use your Raspberry Pi as a gaming console, media server, or stand-alone computer, WiFi is a great way to get internet access. But if you connect to your Pi with SSH or a remote desktop application a lot, WiFi is actually one of the slowest and least reliable ways to do it. A direct ethernet connection is much faster and a lot more stable.

How to Connect to a Raspberry Pi with an Ethernet Cable – [Link]

Using a Color Sensor (TCS230) with Arduino Uno and ST7735 color TFT display

In this video tutorial educ8s.tv show us how use the TCS230 color sensor with Arduino:

Hey guys, I am Nick and welcome to educ8s.tv a channel that is all about DIY electronics projects with Arduino, Raspberry Pi, ESP8266 and other popular boards. In this video we are going to learn how to use the TCS230 color sensor, a very interesting sensor. I have built a simple project to demonstrate that this sensor is really capable. I use an Arduino Uno and a 1.8” Color TFT display and of course the color sensor. As you can see, the sensor detects the colors and it displays them on the screen. The color we get on the screen is pretty close to the real color of the object. Cool isn’t it? Now, let’s see the parts that we need in order to build this project.

Using a Color Sensor (TCS230) with Arduino Uno and ST7735 color TFT display [Link]

How to Setup a Raspberry Pi Without a Monitor or Keyboard

Circuit Basics writes:

In this video, I’ll walk you through the steps of setting up a Raspberry Pi from the first boot up without a keyboard or monitor. This process requires only a PC or Mac, an ethernet cable, and access to a network router.

How to Setup a Raspberry Pi Without a Monitor or Keyboard [Link]