Tag Archives: Raspberry Pi

Raspberry Pi DIN Rail I/O Interfaces

VP Process Inc has recently released a new series of Raspberry Pi DIN rail mountable “Hardened” interfaces. The first release is the PI-SPI-DIN-RTC-RS485, which is available in three mounting versions: DIN Rail Clips, DIN Rail Enclosure, and PCB Spacers.

The basic specifications for the PI-SPI-DIN-RTC-RS485 are:

  • Power Input: 9 to 24 VDC
  • 5VDC @ 2.5A (Max 3Amp) Power Supply
  • RS485 Output via RJ45 connector and Terminal Block
  • 2 GPIO connectors – 1 internal for Raspberry Pi, 1 external for peripherals
  • 1 PI-SPI-DIN connector (16 Pin) for PI-SPI-DIN series (power, SPI, I2C and 5 Chip Enables)
  • Real Time Clock (I2C) Microchip MCP7940 with Battery Backup

Last week, VP Process added three modules to the series: PI-SPI-DIN-8AI, PI-SPI-DIN-8DI, and PI-SPI-DIN-4KO. Each module of these has 2 x 16 Pin Ribbon Cable sockets and cables and each connector and cable will carry power, I2C bus, SPI bus and 5 GPIO lines for Chip Select. Additionally, each module is available in the three mounting versions mentioned above. Each module takes power from the ribbon cable as a local input power to  5 VDC switching power supply and 3.3 VDC LDO regulator power supply. At the same time, the main module will maintain the 5VDC to keep the Raspberry Pi safe from interfaces loading.

PCB’s mounted with DIN rail clips

The three modules full specifications

PI-SPI-DIN-8AI : An 8 channel 4-20 mA Input interface based on the 12 Bit Microchip MCP3208 A/D converter. Each input can be re-configured (changing resistors and capacitors) as a VDC input or Thermistor input for temperature applications.

PI-SPI-DIN-8DI : An 8 channel Isolated Digital Inptu interface based on the Microchip MCP23S08 I/O Expander. Since this design has 4 addresses, it allows  4 interfaces to connect together for a total of 32 Inputs, all of 1 chip select. The inputs accept up to 24 VDC or 24 VAC, or switch inputs.

PI-SPI-DIN-4KO ; A 4 channel relay output module. Each relay is rated at 2 AAC and is SPDT. The design is based on the Microchip MCP23S08 I/O Expander. Since this design has 4 addresses, it allows 4 interfaces to connect together for a total of 16 relay outputs.

DIN Rail Enclosures

Fortunately, VP Process had perfectly designed PI-SPI-DIN series to suit many industrial applications by making the designs industrial grade, with adding terminal blocks and enclosures. Furthermore, a new module of the same series is coming soon, PI-SPI-DIN-4AO; a 4 channel analog 4-20mA output module.

Finally, the main module is available for $48, where the remaining modules cost $33 each. More details are available at this page.

Source: WidgetLords Electronics

Samba : Set Up Your Raspberry Pi As A Local Network File Server

Samba is the Linux implementation of the SMB/CIFS file sharing standard used by Windows PCs and Apple computers and widely supported by media streamers, gaming consoles, and mobile apps. In this tutorial, you will learn how to use a Raspberry Pi as a file server where you can save backups and share files with all the other computers on your network using Samba.

You need the following things for this tutorial:

  • A keyboard (Wired or wireless)
  • A mouse (Wired or wireless)
  • Raspberry Pi (Model 3B is recommended)
  • A 32GB (or smaller) micro SD card
  • Internet connection (Only to download Samba)

The SD card must have a reasonable amount of free storage space without requiring any extra steps to make it accessible. However, if you want extra storage, simply mount a large USB drive and create a Samba entry for it. If you want to keep your Samba file server compact and portable, install Raspbian on a 128Gb or 256GB SD card. Before purchasing, check online whether the SD card is fully compatible with Raspberry Pi or not.

Install Samba

Samba is available in Raspbian’s standard software repositories. Update your repository index, make sure that the operating system is fully updated, and install Samba using apt-get. Open a Terminal and type:

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get upgrade
sudo apt-get install samba samba-common-bin

The download and installation process will start and it will take a while depending on your internet speed.

Create A Shared Directory

Now you need to create a shared directory that will be accessible by other PCs/mobiles connected to the same network. You can put it anywhere, but in this tutorial, it will be at the top level of the root file system of the Pi’s microSD card. Type the following command:

sudo mkdir -m 1777 /share

To help prevent the directory from being unintentionally deleted, the above command sets the sticky bit (1) and gives everyone read/write/execute (777) permissions on the shared directory.

Configure Samba

In this step, edit the smb.conf  file to configure Samba to share the selected directory and allow users to perform various actions like read, write etc. Open the smb.conf file using the following command:

sudo leafpad /etc/samba/smb.conf

You need to add the following entry:

[share]
Comment = Pi shared folder
Path = /share
Browseable = yes
Writeable = Yes
only guest = no
create mask = 0777
directory mask = 0777
Public = yes
Guest ok = yes
Configure Samba On Raspberry Pi
Configure Samba On Raspberry Pi

As per the above configuration, anyone can read, write, and execute files in the shared directory, either by logging in as a Samba user or as a guest. Just omit the guest ok = yes line if you don’t want to allow guests. To share a larger external hard disk, simply create a smb.conf entry for the path you want to share across the network (here the external hard disk).

Create A User & Start Samba

Everything is configured and now it’s time to create a user. To set up a password for the user, enter the following command:

sudo smbpasswd -a pi

Then set a password as prompted. It’s recommended that the password should be different from your Pi’s login password. Finally, restart the Samba and set it to start automatically when the Raspberry Pi starts up. Enter the following command:

sudo /etc/init.d/samba restart

Once you’ve made sure that you can locate your shared folder on the network, you can safely disconnect the mouse, monitor, and keyboard from your Pi and just leave it running as a headless file server.

Pi Desktop Case – include peripherals too

The ‘Pi Desktop’ kit from element14 offers some great features like Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, a real-time clock, an interface for an mSATA-SSD hard drive, an optional camera, heat sink, a neat power switch and of course the sleek black case. [via]

The Raspberry Pi is a well designed, powerful and inexpensive board, but not a complete computer. Some distributors know you need more than just a plastic case and a mains-adapter power supply (or USB cable). The ‘Pi Desktop’ kit from element14 contains everything you need and more, turning your RPi into a fully fledged computer.

Pi Desktop Case – include peripherals too – [Link]

Post Tweets With Your Raspberry Pi

Raspberry Pi is famous for its great computing strength and ability to run the Linux operating system. In today’s tutorial, you’ll learn how to make your Raspberry Pi tweet. You can add extra features to this project to post tweets autonomously if any specific event occurs. Let’s get started.

Required Parts

You’ll need following parts to make this project.

  • Raspberry Pi running Raspbian OS (Any model)
  • USB Mouse
  • USB Keyboard
  • HDMI Compatible Monitor
  • HDMI Cable
  • USB power supply for Raspberry (5V 2A)
  • Working Internet Connection

Create App In Twitter

You need to create an app in Twitter so that Raspberry Pi can use to make tweets on your behalf. Go here to make a twitter app. The Raspberry Pi will require following parameters to make tweets:

  • Consumer Key (API Key)
  • Consumer Secret (API Secret)
  • Access Token
  • Access Token Secret

You can find all these details from your app.

Creating An App In Twitter
Creating An App In Twitter

Store Keys In Raspberry Pi

In this step, you need to create a python file in your Raspberry Pi and store all the Keys and Tokens there. Create a file named keys.py in your working folder with all information in it.

consumer_key = "Place your consumer key here"
consumer_secret = "Place your consumer secret key here"
access_token = "Place the access token here"
access_token_secret = "place the access token secret here"
Get Access Keys And Access Tokens From App
Get Access Keys And Access Tokens From App

Now, save the file and go the nex step of this tutorial.

Install Twython

Well, what is Twython actually? Twython is the premier Python library providing an easy way to access the Twitter data. It’s been tested by companies, educational institutions and individuals alike. This amazing library will make our job a lot easier and the code much shorter. To install the Twython library, follow the given steps:

 sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get upgrade
 sudo apt-get install python-setuptools
 sudo easy_install pip
 sudo pip install twython
 sudo pip install requests
 sudo pip install requests-oauthlib

pip is required to install Twython, so it’s installed in 3rd step. But if you already have pip installed, just ignore that step.

Write The Python Script & Run It

Open a file in your working directory in your Raspberry Pi and rename it to twitter.py. Make sure that it is in the same directory wit previously created keys.py file. Now, copy-paste the following code using any editor or IDE:

import sys

from twython import Twython
from keys import (
 consumer_key,
 consumer_secret,
 access_token,
 access_token_secret
)
twitter = Twython(
 consumer_key,
 consumer_secret,
 access_token,
 access_token_secret
)
message = "My first tweet using Rapberry Pi! Yeh!"
twitter.update_status(status=message)
print("Raspberry Pi successfully tweeted: %s " % message)

Pretty simple, isn’t it? Actually, the Twython library performs lots of tasks behind the screen keeping the code surprisingly small.

Now, save the file and open terminal in your raspberry pi. Write the following command and hit the Enter key to run this Python script:

python twitter.py

That’s all. Now you can see that is your Raspberry Pi is tweeting successfully.

42 of the Most Useful Raspberry Pi Commands

circuitbasics.com has posted an article about the most usefull Raspberry Pi commands:

Sometimes it’s hard to keep track of all the Raspberry Pi commands you use, so I created a list of some of the most useful and important ones that will make using Linux on the Raspberry Pi a lot easier. But first a quick note about user privileges…

42 of the Most Useful Raspberry Pi Commands – [Link]

XOD, Visual Coding For Microcontrollers

XOD is a new visual programming language for microcontrollers launched now. Pronounced [ksəud], this programming language idea was inspired by vvvv,  a hybrid visual/textual live-programming environment for easy prototyping and development which is designed to facilitate the handling of large media environments with physical interfaces, real-time motion graphics, audio and video that can interact with many users simultaneously.

Like Code, But Better

The basic unit of this language called node, a block that represents either some physical device like a sensor, motor, or relay, or some operation such as addition, comparison, or text concatenation. Each node has its inputs, outputs, and a function. Once you link the nodes together you will define a behavior. XOD will protect you from creating programs don’t compile, by making sure all nodes linked will give the behavior desired.

If it links, it’s likely going to work“.

Fortunately, you won’t need Firmata or another controller PC to export the code that suits your platform. XOD will export for you the needed native code and run it directly. It is already compatible with Arduino, Raspberry Pi and other popular development boards.

XOD gives you the possibility to build your own nodes by merging some nodes together, making it simpler and faster. You can share these nodes with the community and search for trendy ones too once the platform is live.

XOD includes plenty of nodes in their platform. The team believes they are good enough to start your projects just like normal programming!

27 days left for Alpha version although you can still get early access to the XOD private alpha by signing up at www.xod.io!

Control Your Raspberry Pi Remotely

Sometimes while building a Raspberry Pi based project, it may be difficult to connect a screen, mouse and keyboard each time you want to edit something. If the Raspberry Pi is connected to a network, then running a remote desktop on it could be a good solution.

Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) is a proprietary protocol developed by Microsoft, which provides a user with a graphical interface to connect to another computer over a network connection. In this article, you will find three different methods to run remote desktop on your Raspberry Pi.

Method 1: Using TeamViewer

TeamViewer is a proprietary computer software package for remote control, desktop sharing, online meetings, web conferencing and file transfer between computers.  It is available for Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X, Linux, Chrome OS, iOS, Android, Windows RT, Windows Phone 8 and BlackBerry operating systems. It is also possible to access a machine running TeamViewer with a web browser.

ARM-based devices such as Raspberry Pi don’t have a TeamViewer version, but there is still a way to run it using ExaGear Desktop. It allows you to run Intel x86 application on ARM-based Mini PC.

Follow these steps to install and use TeamViewer on your Raspberry Pi:

  1. Get you copy of ExaGear Desktop and install it. You can order it through the official website for $27 for Raspberry Pi 2 and $33 for Raspberry Pi 3.
  2. Enter the guest x86 system using the following command:

    $ exagear
    Starting the shell in the guest image /opt/exagear/images/debian-8-wine2g
    
  3. Download and install TeamViewer

    $ sudo apt-get update
    $ sudo apt-get install wget
    $ wget http://download.teamviewer.com/download/teamviewer_i386.deb
    $ sudo dpkg -i teamviewer_i386.deb
    $ sudo apt-get install -f
    $ wget http://s3.amazonaws.com/wine1.6-2g-2g/wine1.6-2g-2g.tar.gz
    $ tar -xzvf wine1.6-2g-2g.tar.gz
    $ sudo ./teamviewer-fix-2g.sh
    
  4. Run TeamViewer from Raspberry Pi start menu, and setup static password for remote connection. Go to connection menu, select setup unattended access and enter a name for your Raspberry and a password. Once you are finished your Raspberry Pi ID will appear.
  5. Now download and install TeamViewer on your desktop and run it from start menu. Enter the Raspberry Pi ID in the “Partner ID” field and press connect button. A pop-up window will ask you for the password. Enter it and the remote session will open in a new window.

Method 2: Using VNC

Virtual Network Computing (VNC) is a graphical desktop sharing system that uses the Remote Frame Buffer protocol (RFB) to remotely control another computer. It transmits the keyboard and mouse events from one computer to another, relaying the graphical screen updates back in the other direction, over a network.

You can install VNC directly on your Raspberry without any additional software, follow these steps to install and prepare VNC:

  1. Install VNC server on Raspberry using this command:

    $ sudo apt-get install tightvncserver'
    
  2. Start VNC server by typing “$ vncserver” on the terminal. At the first start it will ask you to enter a password which will be used to access Raspberry Pi remotely.
  3. Get and save your Raspberry Pi IP address using this command

    $ sudo ifconfig
    

    and search for string like this (inet addr: 192.168.1.110)

  4. Now download and install a VNC client program on your desktop, such as TightVNC.
  5. Run TightVNC Client from the start menu. In Remote Host field enter: IP address of Raspberry, colon, 1. It should be like this ‘192.168.1.110:1’ and press Connect. You are now connected to your Raspberry Pi.

Method 3: Using ssh + X11 forwarding

Secure Shell (SSH) is a cryptographic network protocol for operating network services securely over an unsecured network. The best known example application is for remote login to computer systems by users.

X11 is the X Window System which allows you to run software on a UNIX/Linux server in a Windows-like way such that you can use your mouse to click around in it. The secure way to do this is to forward your X11 packets through your ssh connection which automatically sets your DISPLAY environment variable for you. On the configuration menu, select X11 under SSH and check “Enable X11 forwarding”.

  1. Login to Raspberry Pi and run GUI of a program.

This tutorial is made by Eltechs, the company of ExaGear. You can visit the original post for more detailed steps and information.

HealthyPi v3 – Health HAT for Raspberry Pi

An open-source, multi-parameter, full fledged human body vital sign monitoring HAT for Raspberry Pi as well as standalone use.

HealthyPi is a do-it-yourself, open-source vital sign monitor based on the Raspberry Pi. THe HealthyPi board itself is a HAT add-on for the Raspberry Pi 3 which measures all the human body’s vital signs and sends it over to the Raspberry Pi. Couple it together with the official Raspberry Pi touchscreen and you’ve got a full-fledged vital sign monitor.

HealthyPi v3 – Health HAT for Raspberry Pi – [Link]

Pi Zero Gameboy = GameBoy Zero

moosepr @ hackaday.io writes:

My attempt to get the smallest, simplest GameBoy style device, based on the pi Zero.

Pi Zero Gameboy = GameBoy Zero – [Link]