Tag Archives: Raspberry Pi

Niryo One, Your Next Affordable 6-Axis Robotic Arm

Two French engineers who are passionate about innovative use cases made out of new technologies and building accessible and collaborative robot, are now mixing last technology progresses in mechanics, electronics and computer science to deliver a new product: Niryo One!

Niryo One is an accessible 6 axis robotic arm, made for makers, education, and small companies, and powered by Arduino, Raspberry Pi and ROS. The 3D printed robot will be customizable since you can print out your pieces and customize them the way you like. STL files will be open source soon.

In a mission to democratize robotics, Niryo One team is working on making it affordable and user friendly. Endless number of applications are possible by using Niryo One, like drilling, pick and place operations, and many other options thanks to the 6-axis available.

Niryo One can be controlled in many ways, whether using a web and mobile application, a joystick, or just your hands in its learning mode. Also you can control it using G-code if you want to use Niryo as a CNC.

Connected with the cloud, each update and project you do with Niryo will be synced there, with the ability to share it with the online community. More gadgets and tools will be added to the cloud and you will also get free app updates.

Technical Specifications

As makers ourself, we love 3D printing, Arduino and Raspberry Pi. Those are great to learn robotics, with the help of the online community. We want to go a step further, by embed those technologies and electronics platforms in Niryo One, to show to the world that, yes,  we can make a real useful product with 3D printing, Arduino and Raspberry Pi. We hope that more people will be interested in learning these technologies when seeing what our robot can do, so it will reinforce the community around robotics projects.

Niryo One is now live on Kickstarter and still has 35 days to go. You can pre-order a mini Niryo One kit for $119 and the early bird Niryo One maker kit for $549. More details can be found at the official website.

PiSound – Audio Card For Raspberry Pi

by blokas.io:

pisound is an ultra-low latency high-quality soundcard and MIDI interface specially designed for Raspberry Pi pocket computers. Equipped with 192kHz 24-bit Stereo Input and Output driven by the legendary Burr-Brown chips, DIN-5 MIDI Input and Output ports, user-customizable button and bundled software tools, this little board will bring your audio projects to a whole new level!

PiSound – Audio Card For Raspberry Pi – [Link]

How to Setup WiFi on the Raspberry Pi

In this video, Circuit Basics will show us how to configure a WiFi dongle and establish a wireless connection for your Raspberry Pi. This is useful if you don’t wish to connect your Raspberry Pi to your network with an Ethernet cable.

How to Setup WiFi on the Raspberry Pi [Link]

Jump Over The Limits of ARM With ExaGear Desktop

While the most of Linux programs are compiled to run on Intel x86 processors, the virtualization softwares appear to give the ability to run Intel x86 application on ARM-based Mini PC such as Raspberry Pi.

In this way, Eltechs, a high-tech startup company, had produced a new binary translator called “ExaGear Desktop”. It runs applications for the conventional desktop and server x86 processors on energy-efficient ARM CPU without recompilation.

ExaGear Desktop creates a second system known as the ‘guest’ system. Once installed, you can switch between the guest and your regular (‘host’) system using the ExaGear and exit commands. Inside the guest system, apt-get and dpkg are used to install Intel x86 software. The guest system is a transparent operation so there is no difference between running x86 applications on x86-based or ARM-based platform. It also gives you the ability to run Windows applications by installing Wine.

ExaGear is compatible with many of ARM-based Mini PCs such as Raspberry Pi 1, Raspberry Pi 2, ODROID, CubieBoard, CuBox, Utilite, Jetson TK1, Wandboard, Banana Pi etc. It also can run on Chromebook with Linux.

Compared with QEMU, another open-source virtualization software, ExaGear is  5 time faster and has  much better performance with CPU and memory as the benchmark results shown when running on Raspberry Pi 2. You can see the benchmarking details and results here.

ExaGear is available for ordering through the official website with a price range between $16.45 and $56.45 according to the hardware used. You can find more information at the product page. And it may be useful to take a look at this review.

Zero W, New €10 Raspberry Pi with WLAN and Bluetooth

Five years ago (on 29 February 2012, to be exact) the original Raspberry Pi was unveiled – on this celebrated first day the available stock was sold out within a few minutes, more than 100,000 boards were ordered and the Farnell and RS Components web stores where down for while because of the high demand…
To celebrate this fifth anniversary the Raspberry Pi Foundation introduces a new product: the Raspberry Pi Zero W, that is, the Raspberry Pi Zero complete with WLAN and Bluetooth. The bad new is that this version costs twice as much as the original Zero, but the good news is that it is nevertheless available for only $10 (without accessories).


The Zero was launched in November of 2015 and has since then acquired a camera connector; these days you could hardly imagine anything or contains a Zero – from miniature fruit machines tot electric skate boards.
A disadvantage of the original Zero was the limited connectivity: the only USB port was often used for a wireless dongle; for connecting peripherals such as a keyboard, mouse and network adapter a USB hub was required, which often cost more than the Zero itself.
By integrating the Cypress CYW43438 on the board this problem is solved for the Zero W: this is the same chip that on the RPi 3 model B provides the 820.11n WLAN and Bluetooth 4.0 connectivity. Listing all the features of the Zero W:

  • 1 GHz single-core CPU
  • 512 MB RAM
  • mini HDMI port
  • micro-USB On-The-Go port
  • micro USB power
  • HAT-compatibele 40-pin header
  • headers for composite video and reset
  • CSI camera connector
  • 802.11n WLAN
  • Bluetooth 4.0

The Zero W is accompanied by an ‘official’ enclosure.
This has three interchangeable lids: a closed lid, a lid with openings for the GPIOs, and a lid with opening and attachment facility for a camera.

Source: Elektor

Anyone Can Build A Robot Arm With MeArm Pi

Mime Industries launches Kickstarter campaign to fund their Raspberry Pi powered robot arm kit that’s simple enough for kids to build.

Mime Industries launched a crowdfunding campaign to fund the production of the world’s first robot arm kit for the Raspberry Pi. Designed to be easy to assemble and not requiring extensive knowledge of electronics, the MeArm Pi STEM kit helps kids and adults learn robotics and teaches them how to code.

Created by Ben Pirt of Mirobot and Ben Gray of MeArm, this is their fourth overfunded technology campaign and is based on the original MeArm, launched back in 2014. “We believe in helping children to have fun whilst learning about technology and the MeArm Pi is completely designed around that goal” said Ben Pirt. “Our products are simple to build and can be easily understood. Meaning you can use them to learn whilst playing, adding your own imagination to make something great”.

The MeArm Pi integrates smoothly with the Raspberry Pi, the ubiquitous educational computing platform. The kit uses a Pi HAT (a plug-on board that fits on the computer) with on-board joysticks for control. MeArm Pi is made from plastic parts for the structure, screws and 4 metal gear servos in addition to the Pi HAT. It can be programmed in Python, Scratch, Java and many other programming languages.

The MeArm Pi campaign launched on the popular crowdfunding site Kickstarter on February 7 2017 and runs until March 9 2017 with a goal of £10,000 (Approx $12,400 USD). All early birds are sold out, rewards include the standard MeArm Pi Kit of £60 (Approx $75 USD) which includes a robotic arm. All kits deliver free worldwide.

Check out the campaign video:

 

Raspberry Pi I2C LCD Set Up and Programming

In this video Circuit Basics show us how to use I2C to connect an LCD to the Raspberry Pi. After showing you how to connect the LCD to the Pi with a PCF8574 (http://www.circuitbasics.com/pj6v), they show you how to program it. First I’ll cover the basic stuff like printing text to the screen, clearing the screen, blinking text, and positioning text. Then I’ll go into more advanced stuff like scrolling text, printing data from a sensor, turning on and off the cursor, and printing custom characters.

Raspberry Pi I2C LCD Set Up and Programming [Link]

iSwitchPi Adds an Intelligent Power Switch to Your Raspberry Pi

by Peter Boxler :

Native Raspberry Pi does not have an On/Off switch and there is no easy way to shutdown the Pi while keeping the filesystem intact. This Intelligent Power Switch allows just that: Power-On the Pi by pressing a pushbutton and also properly Power-Off the Pi with another press on the same button. The intelligence is provided by a program running in an AVR MCU ATtiny44. This C-program implements a Finite State Machine in the MCU. A small Python script is running in the Pi itself. Just one GPIO-Pin is used for two-way communication. In addition, a variable frequency square wave is available for externally interrupting the Pi.

iSwitchPi Adds an Intelligent Power Switch to Your Raspberry Pi – [Link]

Raspberry Pi Zero PiE-Ink Name Badge

Maker Josh King has introduced the PiE-Ink Name Badge.

Introducing the PiE-Ink Name Badge – a Raspberry Pi Zero Python Powered E-Ink Linux Name Badge (what a mouthful!). A full wearable linux computer system on your chest!

Raspberry Pi Zero PiE-Ink Name Badge – [Link]

How to Access the Raspberry Pi GUI with a Remote Desktop Connection

circuitbasics.com has a tutorial on how to access Raspberry Pi with a remote desktop connection.

In the previous post, we learned how to set up a WiFi dongle and access the Raspbian command prompt via an SSH client called PuTTY. PuTTY is a great application for accessing the command line in Raspbian from another computer, but you can’t use it to access the Raspbian desktop (GUI). In order to access the Raspbian GUI from another computer, we need to configure it to work with a remote desktop application. This will allow us to access our Raspberry Pi desktop (or the command line) from anywhere in the world as long as we have a computer with an internet connection.

How to Access the Raspberry Pi GUI with a Remote Desktop Connection – [Link]