Home Blog  





28 Mar 2014

PlasmaTransistor2

Our beloved silicon-based transistors can “only” work at temperatures up to 550° F (around 290° C), which is much more than what’s needed for most general-purpose applications. But those don’t include a nuclear reactor, obviously! (Unless you have one at home. Do you?)

University of Utah engineers have developed tiny plasma-based transistors that can withstand temperatures up to 1,450° F (almost 800° C) and work with ionizing radiation. Since plasma itself is ionized gas, it can even be said that nuclear radiation contributes to proper functioning of these devices. Besides, current plasma-based transistors are about 500-µm long, while these newcomers measure 1–6 µm (!).

 

[via Elektor Electronics]

March 20, 2014 – University of Utah electrical engineers fabricated the smallest plasma transistors that can withstand high temperatures and ionizing radiation found in a nuclear reactor. Such transistors someday might enable smartphones that take and collect medical X-rays on a battlefield, and devices to measure air quality in real time.

“These plasma-based electronics can be used to control and guide robots to conduct tasks inside the nuclear reactor,” says Massood Tabib-Azar, a professor of electrical and computer engineering. “Microplasma transistors in a circuit can also control nuclear reactors if something goes wrong, and also could work in the event of nuclear attack.”

Tiny Transistors for Extreme Environs - [Link]

27 Mar 2014

11-newtechnique

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a new processing technique that makes light emitting diodes (LEDs) brighter and more resilient by coating the semiconductor material gallium nitride (GaN) with a layer of phosphorus-derived acid.

“By coating polar GaN with a self-assembling layer of phosphonic groups, we were able to increase luminescence without increasing energy input,” says Stewart Wilkins, a Ph.D. student at NC State and lead author of a paper describing the work. “The phosphonic groups also improve stability, making the GaN less likely to degrade in solution.”

New technique makes LEDs brighter, more resilient - [Link]

 

27 Mar 2014

Arduino-Uno-Photograph

In this article, circuitstoday.com explain the basics surrounding arduino. As the title indicates, this article is for absolute beginners in the world of electronics and for people who are beginning with arduino boards.

Arduino is an electronics prototyping platform based on a micro controller. Arduino boards are usually made using Atmel’s Atmega series micro controllers or ARM micro controllers. Arduino is an open source hardware project which means the designs of board (the hardware architecture, CAD files) are available to public with open source license. Anyone can modify the hardware designs and the associated software.

What is Arduino – Introduction to Arduino for Beginners - [Link]

27 Mar 2014

IMG_20140325_130310-600x446

Rupert Hirst writes:

I finally got round to making my capacitor ESR tester this week after finding a nice simple 5 transistor version by EEVBlog member Jay_Diddy_B. Unfortunately, for me, the design was only SMD so, I decided to replicate his schematic in Eagle PCB using a through hole component design.

[via]

Dr Brown’s capacitor ESR tester - [Link]


27 Mar 2014

We are always vulnerable to thieves but we don’t know when will they strike. When they do, it will be too late for us to notice that our property was already taken. This project helps alert the owner if a thief is picking a lock. It can be used on doors, luggage or anything else with a lock.

The concept is simple, if the lock is opened without our consent, an alarm will be turned on indicating an intruder. This circuit is based on a NAND gates configuration that will turn the switching side on or off.

In this project we used the HEF4011B, a quad 2-input NAND gate. The outputs are fully buffered for the highest noise immunity and pattern insensitivity to output impedance. The configuration of the IC HEF4011B produces a HIGH output if the input is HIGH. Based on the figure, when the wire loop is closed, the IC HEF4011B will have a LOW input, and when the wire loop is triggered, the IC HEF4011B will have a HIGH input which will make its output also HIGH. The HIGH output of the IC HEF4011B will then be inputted to the base of the BC547 transistor allowing the current to flow on the relay switching the indicator or the buzzer ON.

Components:

  • HEF4011B quad 2-input NAND gate
  • BC547 transistor
  • 1N4007 diode
  • 1kΩ resistor
  • 4.7kΩ resistor
  • 0.1µF capacitor
  • Relay
  • 5V dc power source

Anti-theft Security Alarm Circuit – [Link]

27 Mar 2014

obr1496_p344

Bare wires going from a tested device do not have to mean a problem or require a long time to connect to a power supply.

Who wouldn´t know it – a tested device on a workbench has only wire leads (without any connectors) and we just want to connect it to a power supply simply and reliably. If you don´t want to laboriously connect banana plugs to wire leads (what we surely don´t want if the test is supposed to last only a while :-)) we have only a possibility to use screw terminals on a given laboratory source. But usually neither this isn´t an ideal solution, as the openings in such terminals are usually quite small and if we want to put a wire only “between two pads” – it usually falls out at tightening…

Fortunately, there is one very handy component – „WAGO banana plug“, i.e. banana plug with a spring clamp into which it´s possible to insert a wire immediately and without any tools. Similarly simply we´re able to loosen it in a fraction of second – by pressing a body of a plug. The principle of a terminal is the same as for example in lighting connectors Wago 224 series.

We believe that you´ll like this useful helper and you´ll find it belonging to a “must have” category. On stock we keep three color versions (black, red and blue) as well as a set of 50 pcs Wago 215-111 (mix of 5 colors in 10 pcs). Upon request we´re able to supply you any other color version.

Detailed description can be found at particular types.

Simplify your work at development and testing with WAGO banana plugs - [Link]

26 Mar 2014

lt3680

This 5v dc power switching converter is designed using the LT3680 power switching regulator manufactured by Linear Technology. This 5v switching regulator require an input voltage between 6.3 and 36 volts and will provide a 5 volt fixed voltage at a maximum current of 3.5A. LT3680 use current mode topology for fast transient response and good loop stability. Low ripple Burst Mode operation maintains high efficiency at low output currents while keeping output ripple below 15mV in a typical application.

LT3680 – 5V Step-Down Switching Regulator - [Link]

26 Mar 2014

687474703a2f2f7777772e6c656d63752e6f72672f45464d33325a473131302d517569636b2d53746172742d426f6172642e6a7067

A purely software based USB peripheral for ARM Cortex M0+ devices. This software enables Cortex M0+ devices to act as Low speed USB device. It includes a lightweight USB & HID Stack and easily be optimized to consume only 4KB of flash.

LemcUSB: software USB for EFM32ZG (ARM Cortex M0+) - [Link]

26 Mar 2014

2583Fig

This relatively simple circuit uses a 6-V DC supply with a PWM current-source configuration to provide efficient, adjustable dimming of a white LED over a wide range, needed to accommodate the unique lighting needs of an optical microscope over its magnification range from 40× to 1000×. by James Campbell

When the built-in incandescent light source of my venerable Olympus microscope failed after many years of use, I decided to design a reliable modern replacement. A 1-W white LED (SEOUL X42182, 350 mA max, Vf = 3.25 V) was the obvious choice to provide high brightness and full-spectrum light without the heat of incandescent or xenon arc lamps. The microscope lamp brightness needs to be adjustable, however, to accommodate the different objective lenses, which offer magnifications from 40× to 1000×.

Current Source For LED Microscope Illuminator Provides Full-Spectrum Light - [Link]

26 Mar 2014

DI5412f2

This Design Idea describes a simple two-chip CMOS circuit that can sort capacitors into 20 bins over a wide range (100pF to 1μF), using 10 LEDs to display the value range. The circuit is power efficient and can be run using two CR2032 cells. As such, it can be built into a handheld probe. by Raju Baddi

Simple capacitance meter bins parts - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

Search Site | Advertising | Contact Us
Elektrotekno.com | Free Schematics Search Engine | Electronic Kits