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24 Sep 2014

PSA2702T_WebOrig

by Kenneth Wyatt @ edn.com:

As you’re aware, I’m an avid fan of Thurlby Thandar Instruments (TTi) line of handheld spectrum analyzers, having purchased nearly every model as they are released. One of my long-term wishes is that TTi produce an analyzer with an upper range of 6 GHz. Well, my wishes have been met in their newly released model PSA6005! As I travel a lot in my job, I like to take the minimum amount of test equipment possible.

6 GHz spectrum analysis in your hand! - [Link]

24 Sep 2014

teledynelecroy_wavejet-touch-duo_500x213

by Martin Rowe @ edn.com:

Teledyne LeCroy has added a touchscreen to its WaveJet oscilloscopes. The WaveJet Touch, with a 7.5-in. touchscreen display, is based on the company’s WaveJet 300 series. The WaveJet Touch comes in two 4-channel models: 350 MHz (WaveJet 334T, $4200) and 500 MHz (WaveJet 354T, $5000). Both models have up to 5 Msamples of waveform memory, sampling at up to 2 Gsamples/s.

500 MHz Oscilloscope for $5000 and a touch screen, too - [Link]

23 Sep 2014

DIY-RFID-Card-Lock-System

Shawn McCombs blogged about his DIY Arduino RFID card door lock system 100 cards build. [via]

DIY RFID card lock system - [Link]

23 Sep 2014

pwm_frequency-600x433

Kerry D. Wong writes:

I just got myself a couple of Arduino Due boards. While they were released almost two years ago, I have not really got a chance to look at these until quite recently. Arduino Due is based on Atmel’s ATSAM3x8E 32-bit ARM Cortext-M3 processor. The processor core runs at 84 MHz, which is significantly faster than its 8-bit AVR counterpart ATmega328p which runs at 16 MHz. For an ATmega328p, the highest achievable PWM frequency is 8Mhz (square wave), so we should be able to generate much higher frequency signals on an Arduino Due. But how high can we go? Let’s find out.

[via]

On Arduino due PWM frequency - [Link]


23 Sep 2014

example__86477.1409204603.1280.1280by shop.ciseco.co.uk:

The Wireless Inventors Kit for the Raspberry Pi (RasWIK) is an exciting and affordable addition to the Raspberry Pi. RasWIK demonstrates that with our leading edge technology anyone (and we mean anyone) can build wireless sensors and actuators , you do not need huge experience, a degree or even any tools. We show you even how to connect the devices you build to “the Internet of Things” (IoT) service providers such as Xively.

Getting started is just 5 simple steps:
1. Insert the preconfigured SD card to your Pi
2. Plug in the Slice of Radio to the GPIO connector
3. Turn on the Pi
4. Power the XinoRF development board
5. Lauch the Python based example application on your Pi
Thats it!……..you are now past step one of your journey to wireless nirvana :)

RasWIK – Raspberry Pi Wireless Inventors Kit - [Link]

23 Sep 2014

iPhone-6-plus-teardown-inside-case

by Cabe Atwell @ edn.com:

Love it or hate it, there’s no question that Apple’s iPhone line is popular, and while the numbers haven’t officially been announced yet, the company has already broken its record for pre-orders online (roughly 4 million in a 24-hour period compared to the iPhone 5’s 2 million). The new smartphone comes in two flavors — the 6 and the 6 Plus. In this teardown, we focus on Apple’s flagship, the larger “phablet” 6 Plus.

Teardown: Inside the iPhone 6 Plus - [Link]

22 Sep 2014

Spot-welder-1_Article_files_Tech-tips_Spot-welder_thumb_medium300_0

by avdweb.nl:

A fine-spot welder is one of the few equipment where building yourself is cheaper than buying. There are already published a lot of DIY spot welders, this one has some unique features:
It can be used in 2 welding applications: opposed and series configuration.
The construction is kept very simple.
Accurate electrode force adjustment.
It has a solid electrode holder, made of a radiator earthing clamp.
An Arduino microcontroller is used to set the weld time accurately.
Creates a double pulse which improves clamping.
The current can be reduced for welding sensitive parts.

DIY battery tab resistance fine-spot welder - [Link]

22 Sep 2014

FEVAXRZHX1WIMWV.MEDIUM

by pinomelean @ instructables.com:

Lithium based batteries are a versatile way of storing energy; they have one of the highest energy density and specific energy(360 to 900 kJ/kg) among rechargeable batteries.

The downside is that, unlike capacitors or other kinds of batteries, they can not be charged by a regular power supply. They need to be charged up to a specific voltage and with limited current, otherwise they turn into potential incendiary bombs.

And that’s no joke, storing such a high amount of energy in a small and normally tight packaged device can be really dangerous.

Li-ion battery charging guide - [Link]

22 Sep 2014

A very brief look at the new WENS 540 Debug Meter with Charles from Trio Test at the Electronex show stand:
This is NOT a review, or my normal blog content, it’s just a quick look because some people may be interested in it. So please, no silly complaints.
A combination 10MHz oscilloscope, 50000 count meter, 8 channel logic analyser, data logger, serial protocol analyser, and digital pattern generator.

WENS 540 Handheld 10MHz Oscilloscope and Debug Meter - [Link]

22 Sep 2014

How boost converters work and how to build a 50W adjustable boost converter circuit.

DC-DC Boost converter tutorial - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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