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3 Aug 2014

obr1486_1

High efficiency, low standby power consumption and a power reserve, all this can be gained with a new adapter from our portfolio.

Minwa NR120P150PGS/E+ is in fact an “ordinary“ adapter with a fixed output voltage 12VDC/1500 mA. But it´s worth to mention, that it meets everything, what we usually require from a modern mains adapter:

  • modern design (SMPS)
  • high efficiency
  • low standby power consumption (<0.3W)
  • meets all latest regulations – EuP2, ErP,…

And finally a bonus – outstanding price. Adapters from company Minwa are in general always price-affordable, but here it is even more obvious. When we compare a one level weaker adapter NK120P100PGS/E+ (12V/1000 mA) with NR120P150PGS/E+ we´ll find, that for the price higher +14% (already at purchase of one piece) we´ll gain +50% power. So if you have a device requiring up to 1.5A current, or you use a 1A adapter at almost 100% and you want to gain some power reserve and probably a longer lifetime of an adapter, you can do so with minimum expenses.

Plus 50% of power for a scant one Euro? - [Link]

3 Aug 2014

ltc3622bbbb

by elektor.com:

Linear Technology has recently announced an addition to its family of power regulator solutions. The LTC3622 is a dual step-down regulator in a small 3 x 4 mm package providing two independently configurable 1 A outputs operating from a 2.7 to 17 V input. External voltage divider networks define the two output voltages or alternatively a range of fixed output voltage versions result in a lower component count. The input voltage range makes it suitable for operation from single or multiple lithium cells or from a vehicular supply.

New Dual step-down Regulator - [Link]

3 Aug 2014

scope-600x450

Paul over at DorkbotPDX writes:

For the last several weeks, I’ve been working on SPI transactions for Arduino’s SPI library, to solve conflicts that sometimes occur between multiple SPI devices when using SPI from interrupts and/or different SPI settings.
To explain, a picture is worth 1000 works. In this screenshot, loop() repetitively sends 2 bytes, where green is its chip select and red is the SPI clock. Blue is the interrupt signal (rising edge) from a wireless module. In this test, the interrupt happens at just the worst moment, during the first byte while loop() is using the SPI bus!
Without transactions, the wireless lib interrupt would immediately assert (active low) the yellow chip select while the green is still active low, then begin sending its data with both devices listening!

SPI Transactions in Arduino - [Link]

2 Aug 2014

iotera

by elektor.com:

We have already seen a number of ideas for tracking tags seeking funds on Kickstarter, most systems are limited by the range of Bluetooth communication with a smart device. This system from Iotera tackles the problem using cloud-based thinking: The basic wireless system consists of one or more tags or ‘iotas’ and a home base unit. Each 22 x 11 x 3 mm iota contains a  chip, accelerometer, temperature sensor, speaker, RF transceiver, Bluetooth (unused so far) and a battery to give up to three months operation. Each iota communicates with the home base unit using wireless channels in the 902 to 928 MHz band giving a range of up to four-miles. Back home, the base unit receives the low-speed transmissions from the iota tag and forwards the information to a server via a Wi-Fi connection.

Novel Cloud-based Tag System - [Link]


2 Aug 2014

Touring factories in Shenzhen: Visiting an assembly line, Seeedstudio and a CNC shop

Shenzhen is the geek’s paradise and can be described as an awesome concentration of very different companies, all within an hour cab ride from your hotel. If you ever go there, I highly recommend you to have a look at Ian’s article to get practical informations. Shenzhen is located in the south of China, right next to the border with Hong Kong. I therefore decided to spend my first day in this former British colony to buy myself a nice camera to bring back cool videos of my adventures.

[via]

Touring in Shenzhen video series from Limpkin - [Link]

1 Aug 2014

mysensors]

Learn how to create your own low cost wireless sensors and connect them to the world.

Store your sensor data at home or in our cloud. We provide fancy graphs and other great online tools to help you manage and analyze your sensor data!

mysensors.org – Learn how to create your own low cost wireless sensors - [Link]

 

1 Aug 2014

SDS6062V-oblique-1200-915

by elektor.com:

In a recent press release the Saelig Company Inc have announced that they will be distributing a new 100MHz four-channel benchtop oscilloscope from Owon. The Far-Eastern manufacturers have been building a reputation for quality, low-cost test equipment and the new TDS7102 has a similar spec to the existing four-channel SDS7102 but with the added convenience of a touch-screen user interface.

The scope features 1GSa/s signal capturing on all four channels simultaneously with a 7.6MSa record length and 50,000 wfmSa/s capture rate. The touchscreen makes it more convenient to position and display waveforms and the scope retains control knobs and buttons for conventional operation.

100 MHz Touch-screen Scope from Owon - [Link]

1 Aug 2014

psudig_sch_1-600x423

Bertho posted a digitally controlled PSU design in the forum. He writes:

The design is for 0…30V and 0…3A (90W) controllable at ~1mV and ~0.1mA steps. The actual accuracy is still out for testing and I assume that noise and non-linearity will be a factor to look at when time comes. The basic design allows for 0…42V (max 45V) and (at least) 0…4A, but then all the components should be re-calculated to match such setup. Also, some components need to be voltage matched for a higher input voltage.
The design is a dual control-loop where the first stage is a switching PSU which is fed back to assure a 2.5V drop over the secondary analog control stage. The secondary stage is also responsible for the current limiter. The idea here is to reduce the power loss in the BJT (Q4) in the analog stage.

[via]

Digitally controlled bench PSU - [Link]

1 Aug 2014

FAH04K9HY3ZC1CN-600x600

Timofte Andrei wrote this instructable detailing the build of his Arduino home automation system:

For this project I’ve used:
1. An Arduino clone
2. SIM900 GSM SHIELD
3. Relay module
4. 2×16 LCD Display
5. DS18B20 temperature sensor
6. Push button
7. Some Dupont wires
8. A led module (this is optional, if you have a chinese relay module with built in LEDs)
9. Some nuts and bolts to mount everything in place
10. A wooden chopping board or other kind of wooden board for propper display of the components

[via]

Arduino GSM home automation system - [Link]

1 Aug 2014

tube-600x400

Ethan of Protofusion designed and built a stereo vacuum tube amplifier based off of the TubeLab SimpleSE design. [via]

DIY vacuum tube amplifier - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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