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7 Oct 2014

FF7YQ75I0XOISBQ.MEDIUM

by JColvin91 @ instructables.com:

Whether we care to admit it or not, motors can be found all over in our everyday lives; they just tend to be hidden. Motors are present in cars, printers, computers, washing machines, electric razors, and much more.

However, there are a number of people (which until recently included myself) that would be uncertain of how to make a motor run if they were handed one. So, let’s learn something today. Let’s learn how to use a stepper motor!

How to use a Stepper Motor - [Link]

24 Sep 2014

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An instructables on motor controllers for cheap robots by JayWeeks

Almost every robot needs to power a motor of some sort or another. Problem is that motors take quite a lot of power, compared to what most microcontrollers operate with. To solve this problem, robots use what is called a motor controller, which usually amounts to some form of electronic switch that can turn on a very high voltage, using a very low one. That’s what we’ll be making today!

[via]

Motor controllers for cheap robots - [Link]

18 Sep 2014

fpga_servo-stepper-600x470

Trandi blogged about his RC servo and stepper motor project. He writes:

For those interested in reproducing this example:
The board is called “EP2C5 Mini Board” and has a EP2C5T144C8 Cyclone II FPGA on it
I used a standard, 9grams micro RC Servo
I used a 28BYJ-48 stepper motor and it’s driver (you can purchase these as a bundle for very cheap on dealextreme or banggood)
I used the free edition of Quartus II from Altera, version 13.0 SP 1 (be careful, later versions do not support Cyclone II FPGAs anymore)
I created a simple project, pasted all this code as a single module (it would of course be cleaner to separate the RC Servo and stepper control code into independent modules)
made the “Top level entity” in the General configuration page equal to “counter” (the name of my module)
used the Pin Planner to assign the inputs/outputs as follows:

[via]

FPGA : RC Servo and Stepper motor control in Verilog - [Link]

14 Sep 2014

Electrostatic_motor

by elektor.com:

Conventional electric motors rely on the forces of electro magnetism to provide motion. An item in the UW-Madison news letter announced that a motor is under development at the headquarters of C-Motive Technologies which uses the force of electric fields.

According to Dan Ludois, an assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at the UW and co-founder of C-Motive Technologies “We have proven the concept of a new motor that uses electric fields rather than magnetic fields to transform electricity into a rotary force, the distinction may sound minor, but it could solve a number of practical problems while saving money”

An Electrostatic Motor - [Link]


6 Sep 2014

servo_header

Ondřej Karas of DoItWireless writes:

We described simple method, how to drive modellers servo. Today, we are going to try to drive this servo from potentiometer connected to TR module ADC. It is reaction to forum thread where is discussion about airplane model control possibility.

[via]

Wireless servo controller II - [Link]

22 Aug 2014

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by Arc Robotics:

There have been a lot of amazing projects come out of the Maker revolution, however, many are limited by the capability of their motor controller. We want to change that. The Arc-Controller is a bridge to bring high Amp motor control to your projects, up to 43 amps with a heat sink. It is capable of variable speed and direction control over a single Stepper Motor or two DC motors, because when do you only need one motor.

The Arc-Controller is compatible with about any Arduino, or other micro controller such as Raspberry Pi. It runs an ATMega328, and is user programmable via the Arduino IDE. Thanks to the ATMega the Arc Controller can run as a standalone micro controller or be slaved by any other device. Giving Makers the ability to push the limits of what has been done and change the power to change the world.

43 Amp Arduino Motor shield, the Arc-Controller - [Link]

15 Jul 2014

12f675pulse

by cuteminds.com:

Everytime we need to test a stepper motor controller we have to connect it to the parallel port of the computer or to a function generator to obtain the necessary pulses the realize the movements of the stepper.

This is a quicker method to check a controller integrity. Simply to make the life easier here is a square wave signals generator. A potentiometer or a trimmer regulates the pulse generation of the 12F675 microchip (a square wave, between 20 hz and 3khz). Ok, there are thousands of different ways to create a pulse generator, but we had a lot of microcontrollers.

12F675 pulse generator - [Link]

10 Jun 2014

motor-speed-control-arduino

praveen @ circuitstoday.com writes:

PWM or pulse width modulation is a very common method used for controlling the power across devices like motor, light etc. In PWM method the power across the load is controlled by varying the duty cycle of the drive signal. More the duty cycle more power is delivered across the load and less the duty cycle, less power is delivered across the load. A hex keypad is used for controlling the speed. The speed can be varied in seven steps using the hex keypad. Arduino UNO is the type os arduino development board used in this circuit. The circuit diagram of the PWM motor speed control using arduino is shown in the figure below.

PWM motor speed control using Arduino - [Link]

24 May 2014

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cdtaylor51 @ instructables.com writes:

I bought a CNC machine some time ago and I was never happy with it. It used a traditional parallel port controller and of course no modern computers have those. So it was always a point of frustration. I used an old Pentium based computer and ran LinuxCNC on it for a while but was still not happy with that. So I started looking for another solution. I decided that I would try to put together an Arduino based controller and try to use USB to communicate with it.

Raspberry Pi Alamode CNC Controller - [Link]

22 May 2014

homemade_pickup_winder_02-600x450

A DIY guitar pickup winding machine built on ATmega8 by Davide Gironi:

A pickup winding machine it is used to wind a guitar pickup.
The core of this project is an ATmega8.
It features:
wind counter
slow startup
automatic stop
configurable motor speed
configurable winds
2 directions

This winder has an LCD display that will show
the current motor direction
the rotating speed of your pickup
the total and current wind counter

[via]

A pickup winding machine built on an ATmega8 - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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