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3 Feb 2014

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Diyouware build a low-cost PCB printer for photoresist using a blue ray module. The UV laser scan the PCB surface and sensitize the UV resistive dry film.

About a year ago my brother and I engaged on a quixotic project to build from scratch a low-cost PCB printer for photoresist.

Finally we did it using a Blue Ray optical pickup (PHR-803T) and his UV laser/electronics to sensitize Dry-film.

The optical pickup is used through his own connector without any modification. We deduced the pinout using reverse engineering and designed a driver for an Arduino UNO to control it. Basically, we can adjust the laser power, turn the laser on/off, move the focus lens servo and read the photodiode array signal.

The control of the pickup allowed us implementing a laser auto-focus algorithm based on the astigmatic method. Is the same method use it to focus the laser beam on the Blue Ray disc.

The mechanics is an X/Y Cartesian table which moves the pickup with two Nema 16 stepper motors and T2.5 timing-belts.  Most of the printer framework has been printed with a 3D Reprap printer, so itʼs replicable.

We also developed the Arduino UNO firmware, based on 3D printer firmware Marlin, and the server side software which send the HPGL commands to the printer. Eagle Cadsoft complete the “tool-chain”. It supports HPGL in his CAM processor, so is easy to design the circuit with Eagle, generate the HPGL file and send it to the printer.

DiyouPCB is a prototype and it’s still not perfect: we have some resonance and vibration issues that affect the quality of printing, but it’s a first step to have an alternative method to indirect methods as the famous toner transfer.

DiyouPCB is a PCB printer which uses a Blue Ray™ pickup – [Link]

17 Jan 2014

By understanding the manufacturing process you will be able design PCBs that can made more easily and cheaply. Designing boards that fit within industry standard specifications gives you two advantages: you keep down the cost of your end product, so that it will sell better; and you improve its long-term reliability, so that your customers will keep on coming back to you. And when you want to push the boundaries of technology (and who doesn’t?) you can sit down with your chosen board manufacturer and discuss your requirements knowing where he is coming from.

Eurocircuits – how to make a 4-layer PCB (full version) – [Link]

15 Jan 2014

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Hemal Chevli has designed this open source PCB ruler, that is available at Github:

PCB ruler with different foot prints , SMD proto-typing area, tables, various AWG size holes and inches and cm scale.

Open source PCB ruler – [Link]

9 Jan 2014

Making it easier to assemble electronics. Holds everything in place while providing full access to the work. Open source flexibility.

PCBGRIP is an electronics assembly system designed to make it easier to assemble electronics. Completely customizable, with open source flexibility, it holds printed circuit boards (PCBs), components, and stencils securely, improving both the quality and speed of assembly. It solves the challenges of hand electronics assembly and testing faced by hobbyists, makers, and assemblers.

Unlike other products that just hold PCBs, PCBGRIP holds PCBs and everything else. The open source aluminum extrusion and standard 3mm hardware allow you to build and share whatever you need to help you with your electronics project.

PCBGRIP: Electronics Assembly System – [Link]


22 Nov 2013

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Jie Qi from the MIT Media Lab and Bunnie from Studio Kosagi are hoping to crowdfund their idea for a new method of circuit building called Circuit Stickers.

A crossover between high tech and arts and craft, Circuit Stickers are not a serious prototyping tool but aim to find new uses for easily configurable electronics circuits so that they can be incorporated into other media such as books (basic science or fiction) or even wearable electronics.

Interconnect and power tracks made from sticky copper tape (or other conducting material) are laid out on any non conducting surface such as paper, material or flexible fabric. The individual components come ready-mounted and connect to the copper tracks via pads with sticky anisotropic (Z) tape. These can be peeled off later for reuse. There are two kits available containing a sketchbook to take you through the basics, colored LEDs, sound, light and trigger sensors and a tiny microcontroller with an ISP programming connector. That old Tee shirt looking a bit tired? Spruce it up with a running light display. [via]

Circuit Stickers: Cut and Paste Circuitry – [Link]

19 Nov 2013

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cpldcpu writes:

I grew fond of NXPs new LPC800 Cortex M0+ microcontrollers. I designed a small breakout for the LPC812 TSSOP20. This is the second revision. It includes push buttons for reset and activating the serial bootloader. The board has an integrated 500mA 3.3V LDO to supply both the MCU and connected devices from the USB port. The four pins on the top side (5V,RX,TX,GND) can be used to connect a cheap USB to serial adapter and program the device via the internal bootloader using FlashMagic.

[via]

LPC812 Breakout board – [Link]

15 Nov 2013

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Wouldn’t it be ideal if you could just press ‘print’ to produce a printed circuit board? In a paper titled ‘Instant Inkjet Circuits: Lab-Based Inkjet Printing To Support Rapid Prototyping Of Ubicomp Devices’ researchers Yoshihiro Kawahara of the University of Tokyo, Steve Hodges of Microsoft Research and Benjamin Cook, Cheng Zhang and Gregory Abowd of the Georgia Institute of Technology have detailed exactly how it can be done using commercially available products. To start off with take a standard inkjet printer, fill its cartridge with silver nanoparticle ink and using a normal PCB layout program, print the PCB layout onto resin coated paper, PET film, photo paper or just plain paper. Once deposited the traces undergo a chemical sintering process as the pattern dries and they become conductive.

Instant Inkjet Circuits – [Link]

7 Nov 2013

Here is a nice series of 3 video tutorials, covering basic functionality of Cadsoft Eagle from Schematic Capture to CAM Export and PCB manufacturing. The 3 parts are:

Check them out!

CadSoft Eagle Tutorials by jeremyblum.com – [Link]

5 Nov 2013

Dave tests the myth that plugging a PCB VIA with solder does nothing (or not much) to improve the current handling capability. Is manual wire feed-through any better?

EEVBlog #543 – PCB VIA Current Investigation – [Link]

10 Sep 2013

123D Circuits.io 123D – [via]

123D Circuits is a revolutionary free tool for designing your electronic projects online. You can design in a familiar breadboard view and the app will guide you to make professional printed circuit boards with built in layout tools. When you’re done just click to have your boards professionally manufactured and shipped for free worldwide.What’s also cool is how you can easily, simultaneously work on the same circuit with your friends. And at any point you can compile and emulate your Arduino code inside a live, editable circuit!

123D Circuits.io – Design your circuits online – [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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