Embedded IoT gateway, in a 17 x 25 mm footprint

Lantronix, Inc. has added the xPico 200 family of embedded IoT gateways that measure 17 by 25 mm, to rpvide secure Ethernet, Wi-Fi and/or Bluetooth connectivity for smart IoT solutions. by Graham Prophet @ edn-europe.com:

The xPico 200 series will feature enterprise security, networking intelligence, and pre-integration with Lantronix’s MACH10 management software platform in a compact footprint that enables the functionality of a powerful IoT device gateway to be integrated into machines not previously practical.

Embedded IoT gateway, in a 17 x 25 mm footprint – [Link]

Premier Farnell partners with Intel on IoT

Farnell element14’s tinyTILE is an Intel Curie module based board created by the distributor in partnership with Intel. by Julien Happich @ edn-europe.com:

Measuring only 35x26mm, the tinyTILE has been specifically designed for use in wearable and IoT designs for consumer and industrial edge products. It runs a software platform created specifically for the Intel Curie module and as such, can be programmed using either the Arduino IDE, Intel’s own software, Intel Curie Open Developer Kit (ODK), or Anaren Atmosphere, a cloud-based ecosystem that offers a complete end-to-end IoT solution.

Premier Farnell partners with Intel on IoT – [Link]

Analog Discovery USB isolation

Bob tipped us with his latest article. He writes:

Back when I was developing the PSU burner, I wanted to have the Analog Discovery isolated from the common ground, to avoid noise and other issues. Since I did not have a way to do this, I ended up using a laptop on battery for measurements. But for long term, I needed to have this isolation. Unfortunately, things that can isolate USB at 480Mbps or faster are too expensive to justify.
The solution
The ADUM3160 isolator can provide a magnetically isolated 12 Mbps connection, which proved to be good enough. I grabbed one ready made isolator module from ebay for about $12, cheap enough. Well, it is not perfect: the B0505S DC/DC converter provided can only supply 1W and the Analog Discovery is a hungry beast.

Analog Discovery USB isolation – [Link]

How to Setup WiFi on the Raspberry Pi

In this video, Circuit Basics will show us how to configure a WiFi dongle and establish a wireless connection for your Raspberry Pi. This is useful if you don’t wish to connect your Raspberry Pi to your network with an Ethernet cable.

How to Setup WiFi on the Raspberry Pi [Link]

5V @3A Switching Power Supply

This circuit is about a buck regulator which can produce an output of 5V for a input voltage ranging from 7V to 40V. LM2576 is a monolithic IC and it acts as the heart of this circuit. This IC has a potential of delivering an output current up to 3A and requires less number of external components. It is highly efficient when compared to other three terminal linear regulators and small in size.

Features

  • Input(V): 7VDC to 40VDC
  • Output(V): 5VDC
  • Output load: 3A
  • PCB:36mm X 35mm

5V @3A Switching Power Supply – [Link]

Super Efficient Nano-LED

For the exponentially growing data traffic worldwide, the data connections within and between microchips are increasingly becoming a bottleneck. Optical connections are an obvious successor, but that requires an adequate nano-sized light source – and this has now been found. Researchers from the TU Eindhoven have succeeded in making a nano-LED with an efficiency 1000 times greater than its predecessors, and which can operate at a data rate of gigabits per second.


The data connections between microchips (the so-called interconnects) are responsible for the majority of the energy consumption of these chips – one of the reasons why there is a worldwide search for optical (photonic) interconnects. The problem here is the light source: it has to be small enough to fit in the microscopic structure of the microchips. The output power and efficiency also have to be high enough – and especially the latter was a challenge.

The LED that was developed at the TU Eindhoven has a size of only a few hundred nanometers and has a integrated light channel (wave guide) for transporting the light signal. The increase in the efficiency of this new LED was mostly due to the quality of the coupling of the LED to that light channel.

The research is described in the paper ‘Waveguide-coupled nanopillar metal-cavity light-emitting diodes on silicon’ that appeared in Nature Communications; it can be viewed here.
Source: Elektor

RFM69 output power

Bob @ electrobob.com tipped us with his latest article about RFM69 module.

As I was mentioning in my 1000.1000 Hardware selection, I have opted for the cool RFM69HW radio module. Weirdly enough, in quite a few sources (big distributor and ebay) the higher power HW module is cheaper. So there ie no reason not to get the higher power module, given quantity discounts. But I want it to operate at lower power most of times. The datasheet does not show any differences at lower power, so I had no reason not to go for the higher power module. It even says so on the features list on the front page, I can turn the power down to -18dBm.

RFM69 output power – [Link]

Teardown and review of the new MHS5200A

Craig writes:

I’ve gotten a lot of questions on the blog about the new version of the MHS5200A function generators available on eBay. Viewer Tolga was kind enough to send one in to me to review and tear down. Although some improvements have been made over the older models, there are some concerning issues with these new models too!

Teardown and review of the new MHS5200A – [Link]

Pease on Analog Volume 2 is a free download

via elektormagazine.com:

New in the Electronics Design Library is Volume 2 of FOCUS ON: Bob Pease on Analog. With very few exceptions Bob Pease is remembered fondly all over the globe for his analog design expertise as well as his sense of humor. Our esteemed competitors Electronics Design (magazine) shared and spread his wit and knowledge with the electronics community for years with his special column “Pease Porridge.”

Pease on Analog Volume 2 is a free download – [Link]