The top 10 crystal oscillators from SnapEDA

Elizabeth Bustamante @ snapeda.com lists the top 10 crystal oscillators used today. She writes:

A crystal oscillator is an electronic circuit that generates an electrical signal with a very precise frequency. To achieve this, it uses the mechanical resonance of a vibrating crystal made of piezoelectric material.

The first crystal oscillator was invented in the late 1920s by Walter Guyton Cady who was interested in submarine detection with ultrasonic waves. He suggested that a piezoelectric resonator could be used as a frequency reference, a coupling device between circuits, or a filter.

The top 10 crystal oscillators from SnapEDA – [Link]

ESP8266 WiFi Analyzer

This instrucatables show how to make an ESP8266 version WiFi Analyzer clone.

WiFi Analyzer is a handy app in Android, it help to visualize the WiFi signal information around you. It is very useful for helping select a right channel for setting a new AP. If you selected a channel that as same as another AP near you, you may encounter interference and degrade the network performance.

ESP8266 WiFi Analyzer – [Link]

ASUS Tinker Board Review

ASUS Tinker Board is a Versatile single board computer

Designed for computing hobbyists, the Asus Tinker Board is a single board computer that can do everything you’d expect from a desktop computer, with the capability to be embedded as a controller for a range of devices.

Perfect for connecting a range of external devices, the Tinker Board has four USB ports as well as a HDMI 2.0 connection, so that you can easily connect a keyboard, mouse and monitor just like you would to a standard PC tower. The HDMI 2.0 port supports 4k resolutions – perfect for setting up a personalised media suite.

Straightforward setup

To power your Tinker Board, all you have to do is connect a micro USB charging cable – just like an Android phone charger. And for storage, all you need is a microSD card, so that you can choose the amount of storage that suits your needs.

So that you can get online and add internet connectivity to your projects, the Tinker Board has a LAN Ethernet port as well as built-in WiFi and Bluetooth connectivity.

With an interface for a camera and support for 24-bit audio, the Tinker Board is perfect for setting up a variety of media based projects.

Features:

  • Rockchip RK3288 procesor
  • 1.8GHz ARM Cortex-A17 quad-core CPU
  • 600MHz ARM Mali-T764 quad-core GPU
  • Realtek ALC4040 audio codec
  • 2GB dual-channel DDR3 memory
  • MicroSD card slot
  • HDMI
  • Gigabit Ethernet LAN
  • 802.11b/g/n WLAN, Bluetooth 4.0
  • 4 x USB 2.0
  • Combi audio minijack – headphone/line output and microphone output
  • 40-pin GPIO header
  • 15-pin DSI
  • 15-pin CSI

ASUS Tinker Board Review – [Link]

Tiny UHF Tracker Transmitter

@ instructables.com writes:

This is a little circuit that could be used to track an object up to 400m.

It is essentially an SAW stabilized OOK modulated RF transmitter. The modulation is done with two low frequency ultra low power oscillators that activate the transmitter every two seconds for a short period.

With the setup shown here I got up to 400m range. Current consumption is about 180uA average so it’ll work for a couple of days with the little button cell. Frequency 915MHz.

Tiny UHF Tracker Transmitter – [Link]

NanoPi NEO Core Board for 8$

The NanoPi NEO Core (abbreviated as “NEO Core”) is an alternative NanoPi NEO that works like a CPU board with male pin-headers. It has the same form factor as the NanoPi NEO and same pin descriptions. The connectors and ports are populated to pin-headers on the NEO Core. The NanoPi NEO Core has ESD protection for its MicroUSB port and TF card slot. In addition the NEO Core can have an optional onboard eMMC flash which is preferred by industrial customers.

The NEO Core uses a popular Allwinner H3 SoC and has onboard 256M/512M DDR3 RAM. FriendlyElec offers models with three eMMC options: 8GB/16GB/32GB and one that doesn’t have eMMC at all. FriendlyElec migrated UbuntuCore with mainline kernel 4.11 for it. FriendlyElec develops a Mini Shield for NanoPi NEO Core/Core2 which has the same form factor as the RPi 3. When a NanoPi NEO Core is connected to this Mini Shield the whole assembled module can be well fit into a common RPi 3’s case.

RoomSense Board offers multiple sensors including PIR motion detection

 

RoomSense Board is an Occupancy and Air Sensor.

It can detect movement and room conditions and connect over WiFi with a passive IR occupancy sensor, barometer, temperature and humidity sensors, and the Microchip ATSAMW25 module. Pre-flashed with the Arduino bootloader, the RoomSense is easily deployable as a home automation device by developers of all skill levels.

This tiny USB dongle uses a passive IR motion detector, and temperature, humidity and barometric sensors to monitor a room’s conditions and occupancy. The Microchip ATSAMW25 provides a SAMD21 Cortex-M0+ MCU and WiFi connectivity. It integrates easily with cloud IoT platforms such as MyDevices Cayenne.

Features

  • ARM Cortex-M0+ MCU at 48 MHz
  • 802.11b/g/n WiFi
  • Barometer, humidity and temperature sensors
  • Passive IR motion detector
  • Powered over USB

RoomSense Board offers multiple sensors including PIR motion detection – [Link]

LT8364 current mode step-up regulator has 2.8V – 60V input range

The LT8364 current mode, 2MHz step-up DC/DC converter has an internal 4A, 60V switch. [via]

It operates from an input voltage range of 2.8V to 60V, and is suitable for applications with input sources ranging from a single-cell Li-Ion battery to multicell battery stacks, automotive inputs, telecom power supplies and industrial power rails.

The device can be configured as either a boost, SEPIC or an inverting converter. Its switching frequency can be programmed between 300kHz and 2MHz, enabling designers to minimize external component sizes and avoid critical frequency bands, such as AM radio.

LT8364 current mode step-up regulator has 2.8V – 60V input range – [Link]

512Gbyte embedded universal flash memory in production

Samsung Electronics has begun mass production of what the company claims to be the industry’s first 512-gigabyte (GB) embedded Universal Flash Storage (eUFS) solution for use in next-generation mobile devices. by Julien Happich  @ eenewseurope.com:

The 512GB eUFS packs eight of Samsung’s latest 64-layer 512-gigabit (Gb) V-NAND chips together with a controller chip, doubling the density of Samsung’s previous 48-layer V-NAND-based 256GB eUFS in the same amount of space as the 256GB package. The new high-capacity eUFS enables a flagship smartphone to store approximately 130 4K Ultra HD (3840×2160) video clips of a 10-minute duration. To maximize the performance and energy efficiency of the new 512GB eUFS, Samsung has introduced a new set of proprietary technologies. The 512GB eUFS’ controller chip speeds up the mapping process for converting logical block addresses to those of physical blocks. With its sequential read and writes reaching up to 860 megabytes per second (MB/s) and 255MB/s respectively, the 512GB embedded memory enables transferring a 5GB-equivalent full HD video clip to an SSD in about six seconds, over eight times faster than a typical microSD card.

512Gbyte embedded universal flash memory in production – [Link]

In-display fingerprint sensors to be integrated under glass cover

Synaptics has announced the mass production of its Clear ID FS9500 family of optical in-display fingerprint sensors, designed for smartphones with infinity displays. By Julien Happich @ eenewseurope.com:

The Clear ID in-display fingerprint sensors activate in the display only when needed, offering a one-touch/one-step biometric authentication directly in the touchscreen display area of smartphones. The sensor offers one-touch high-resolution scanning through a full cover glass for sleek, button-free, bezel-free infinity displays, while being naturally protected against wet, dry and cold fingers.

In-display fingerprint sensors to be integrated under glass cover – [Link]

Perovskite solar cells stabilized at 19% efficiency

image: ibnservice.com

Researchers at EPFL in Switzerland have found that adding large organic compounds called guanidinium (CH6N3+) into methylammonium lead iodide perovskite solar cells can provide stable power efficiency of 19%, approaching that of silicon cells. by Nick Flaherty @ eenewseurope.com:

The lab of Mohammad Khaja Nazeeruddin at EPFL Valais Wallis, with colleagues at the University of Cordoba and the Helmholtz Institute in Berlin, has discovered that they can improve the perovskite stability, overcoming what is known as the “Goldschmidt tolerance factor limit.” This is an indicator of the stability of a perovskite crystal, which describes how compatible a particular ion is to it. An ideal Goldschmidt tolerance factor should be below or equal to 1; guanidinium’s is 1.03.

Perovskite solar cells stabilized at 19% efficiency – [Link]