Youtube category

Teardown and analysis of microwave (26.5GHz) electro-mechanical step attenuators

Teardown and analysis of microwave (26.5GHz) electro-mechanical step attenuators from The Signal Path:

In this short episode Shahriar takes a close look at a pair of Hewlett Packard microwave electro-mechanical step attenuators operating up to 26.5GHz. Mechanical attenuators offer excellent repeatability, low insertion loss and nearly limitless linearity. The teardown reveals that the construction of both modules is very similar on the microwave path. In fact, the lower-frequency model still uses the same attenuator components. The newer model employs electronic control circuity while the older generation attenuator uses purely mechanically controlled DC path. Both models use a solenoid style actuators for step attenuation control.

Teardown and analysis of microwave (26.5GHz) electro-mechanical step attenuators – [Link]

Explanation of the Components on a Raspberry Pi

In this video, Circuit Basics unbox a new Raspberry Pi B+ and show you the main components on the board. It’s a good primer to watch before you connect it to a monitor, keyboard, or router for the first time.

Explanation of the Components on a Raspberry Pi [Link]

Tic Tac Toe Game with a touch screen and an Arduino Uno

In this Arduino project video educ8s.tv is going to build an Arduino Game, a Tic Tac Toe game with a touchscreen.

In this video we are going to build an Arduino Tic Tac Toe game. As you can see, we are using a touch screen and we are playing against the computer. A simple game like Tic Tac Toe is is a great introduction to game programming and Artificial Intelligence. Even though we won’t be using any Artificial Intelligence Algorithms in this game, we will understand why Artificial Intelligence Algorithms are required in more complex games.

Tic Tac Toe Game with a touch screen and an Arduino Uno [Link]

WeMOS D1 ESP8266 vs Arduino Uno, Arduino Due and Teensy 3.2. Which one is the fastest board?

In this video educ8s.tv is going to compare the computational speed of the WeMOS D1 ESP8266 based Arduino compatible board with the computational speed of the most popular Arduino boards and the Teensy 3.2.

A few weeks ago, in a similar video we compared the performance of the Teensy with the most popular Arduino boards. Today, we are going to add another board to the comparison, the WeMOS D1 ESP8266 Arduino compatible board. I have prepared a detailed tutorial on that board so you can check it out before we start.

WeMOS D1 ESP8266 vs Arduino Uno, Arduino Due and Teensy 3.2. Which one is the fastest board? – [Link]

Teardown, Repair and Experiments with a Tektronix RSA 6114A Real-Time Spectrum Analyzer

Shahriar @ The Signal Path did a teardown and repair of Tektronix RSA real-time spectrum analyzer.

In this episode Shahriar attempts a difficult repair of a Tektronix RSA real-time spectrum analyzer. This well-equipped instrument reports several error messages during startup POST including LO Unlock as well as Signal Path failures. The service manual of the instrument does not provide any detailed block diagram and no schematics. Most failures require the instrument to be serviced by the Tektronix factory. The equipment has various advanced options including 110MHz analysis bandwidth, digital modulation analysis, wide-band IF output and deep memory.

Teardown, Repair and Experiments with a Tektronix RSA 6114A Real-Time Spectrum Analyzer – [Link]

How to connect a Solar Inverter in 10 minutes

Let’s connect a solar power inverter for AC voltage output in just 10 minutes.

How to connect a Solar Inverter in 10 minutes – [Link]

Omnipod wearable insulin pump teardown

mikeselectricstuff @ youtube.com shares his wearable insulin tear-down. This is an interesting device to tear-down so take a look.

Omnipod wearable insulin pump teardown – [Link]

Save Your Food with Arduino Freezer Temperature Sensor

“Arduino Freezer Temperature Sensor” is an Arduino based project which works as an indicator to notify you when the freezer isn’t work properly. This project was created by “John Saunders”.

freez_project

To make this project, you will need these parts:

What it is needed is to connect Arduino board , temperature sensor and LED all together. The sensor must be connected to an analog input port, and the LED to a digital output port as shown the figure below:

freez_circuit_bb

TMP36 is an easy to use temperature sensor with −40°C to +125°C operation range. It has three pins, supply voltage, output voltage, and ground. The input voltage can be between 2.7 and 5.5 V, so we can connect it with the 5V pin in the Arduino. The output voltage is 0.5V for (0°C) and increases by 10 mV/°C. Here is the full Datasheet.

temperature_tmp36pinout

The next step is preparing the code and uploading it to the Arduino board. The code reads the analog value on its pin, and then convert it to the matching temperature degree. If the temperature is in the normal range, the LED will be on, but if it goes above the threshold, the LED will be turned off.

You can download the code file from here.

Watch this step by step guide:

Basic Electronics – How to use a 555 Timer

Do you want to know how to use a 555 timer? Laura brings you more Back to School tips and tricks on using this integrated circuit.

Basic Electronics – How to use a 555 Timer – [Link]