Tag Archives: breadboard

Homemade breadboard

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by robertgawron.blogspot.com:

A breadboard can be also made at home, from one side, it will be more expensive than those on the markets, but for another side, it’s possible to add commonly used elements, like LEDs, switches, or other things, for example I added a precision IC socket that makes putting in and out of ICs much easier. Choosing what to put there is a bit like a making homemade pizza, one can put anything he likes (and what he has currently in the fridge).

Homemade breadboard – [Link]

 

Breadboard Power Supply

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The Breadboard Power Supply includes AMS1117 5V voltage regulator and AMS1117 3.3V voltage Regulator, providing fixed supply voltages. It features three voltage input options: a screw terminal connector, DC adapter connector and USB connector. It can operate on 6-12V DC power supply and has separate screw terminals for 3.3V and 5V outputs.

The AMS1117 series of adjustable and fixed voltage regulators are designed to provide up to 1A output current and to operate down  to 1V input-to-output differential. The dropout voltage of the device is guaranteed maximum 1.3V,decreasing at lower load currents.

Hardware and PCB were designed with Cadsoft Eagle 7.1.0 version.

Breadboard Power Supply – [Link]

 

ESP8266 Breadboard adapter

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Baoshi of DigitalMe wrote an article detailing his ESP8266 (ESP-07/12) Full I/O Breadboard adapter, that is available at Github:

The rise of the ESP8266 WiFi chip was almost overnight with Espressif’s open approach and pushing from Hackaday. While no ground-breaking product has yet emerged, the development on the chip are phenomenon. However due to an unknown reason the ESP8266 modules manufacture seems to prefer non-standard 2.0mm pitch connector, which gives a lot of headache to breadboarding lovers like me. This forced me to make a breadboard friendly ESP8266 breakout board.
The modules I’m targeting are ESP-07 and ESP-12, both having identical pinout but only differ in antenna type. I choose these two because they have all the I/O available, and using same edge castellation (half vias) connectors which is easy to work with.

ESP8266 Breadboard adapter – [Link]

PICnano breadboard based on PIC18F2550

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by Jesus Echavarria :

Hi all! With a bit of delay, here’s my last work, a PICnano breadboard based on the PIC18F2550 microcontroller. I have in mind a new project and I want to use an small board, like the Arduino Nano board. This new project is battery powered (3,7V Li-Ion battery). After checking the schematics of the Arduino Nano, I see that the microcontroler is powered at 5V. Of course, I can unmount the linear regulator (U3) that is on the board, and bypass the VIN to the microcontroller power supply. But I think it’s funny try to develop a new module when you’ve access to the microcontroller power supply! Also, I want to work with PIC microcontrollers after many years, so here’s what I design!

PICnano breadboard based on PIC18F2550 – [Link]

Experimenter Prototyping Board for easy circuit build

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Raj over embedded-lab.com has build a prototyping board that facilitates the building of simple circuits. It includes a regulated power supply for both 3.3V and 5V, four output LEDs, four input switches, a buzzer, a potentiometer and an onboard breadboard. Using this board you can fast prototype your next project.

Experimenter Prototyping Board for easy circuit build – [Link]

ESP8266 adapter for easy breadboarding

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Raj from Embedded Lab has designed this breadboard friendly adapter for rapid prototyping with the ESP8266 serial-to-wifi module. It receives a ESP-01 model ESP8266 transceiver through a 2×4 female header and provides easy access to those pins through two single row headers that are breadboard friendly.

ESP8266 adapter for easy breadboarding – [Link]

Breadboarding the 68K

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by bigmessowires.com:

My 68K breadboard computer is alive! It’s always a thrill when a pile of random chips does something recognizably computer-ish for the first time. Blinking some LEDs in sequence is great; running BASIC is super extra great. I’m excited.

This simple breadboard machine is a prototype of the 68000 single board computer I plan to build next. By testing the key design ideas in a breadboard prototype, I hope to uncover any lurking design problems while they’re still easy to find and fix. Once the design is committed to a PCB with lots of tiny surface-mount components, it will be much more difficult to make changes. Even probing specific signals to observe what’s happening may be difficult. The breadboard is a much more forgiving place to experiment and learn.

Breadboarding the 68K – [Link]

Neat Breadboard Connector

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by elektor.com:

BreadBoardManiac have been making some cool prototyping boards and accessories like their thin, double-sided, BiscuitBoard and CakeBoard that can be physically mounted onto the LEGO brick system, they even produce a special breadboard made of wood! Along with the accessories is a wire stripping gauge that allows you to accurately bend wire interconnects and cut them to the correct length so that they all line up neat and tidy, flush with the surface of the solderless prototyping board. The finished wiring looks like a work of modern art rather than the messy rats nest effect that you normally get with flying leads. You have probably already worked out that these people are passionate about breadboarding.

Neat Breadboard Connector – [Link]

rLogic: Affordable, Tiny, Universal Logic

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Watch signals propagate through basic digital circuits. Emulate any two-input logic gate using just one rLogic board and one jumper. To order rLogic+, the breadboard compatible variant, simply order normal rLogic. When the survey is sent out you will indicate which you would like.

rLogic is a basic breakout board for the Fairchild Semiconductor TinyLogic® series of Configurable Logic Gates, with an LED for watching signals and cleverly arranged header pins for simple conversion from gate to gate. Different from programmable logic, configurable logic is manually changed through rewiring using a simple shunt (AKA, a jumper), allowing you to easily and quickly morph a single pinkie sized board into any basic logic function you might need. rLogic requires no prior knowledge, but if knowledgeable of basic digital circuitry then you may jump right in with creating. If not, then a few minutes with rLogic boards will begin to teach you the basics of digital electronics.

rLogic: Affordable, Tiny, Universal Logic – [Link]