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15 Apr 2015

Tosh6689A_HRES

by elektor.com:

Toshiba has added a new variant to its TX04 range of microcontrollers. The TMPM46BF10FG is targeted at IoT applications and incorporates dedicated hardware to implement a true random number generator (TRNG: SP800-90C standard) through the combination of a random entropy seed generation (ESG) circuit and Hash-DRGB created by the secure hash processor (SHA) and software program. These features offload computational overheads on the main processor and meet the standards of security required for network communications.

Based around an ARM Cortex-M4F core, with a maximum operating frequency of 120 MHz, the TMPM46BF10FG incorporates 1024 Kbyte of flash memory and 514 Kbyte SRAM required for secure communications control, four types of security circuits for network communications. The MCU also integrates an SLC NAND flash memory controller and 4- and 8-bit error correction circuitry (BCH ECC) that supports memory expansion with 1Gbit to 4Gbit SLC NAND flash memory chips.

Toshiba TX04 for the IoT – [Link]

14 Apr 2015

ESP8266-development-board-power-on

ESP8266 is an 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi module which became very popular recently because of its capabilities and ease of use and integration. Many electronics hobbyists are building projects on ESP8266 and they generally need to connect the module to their PC or a microcontroller. Some interfacing problems arise at this point.

In this project, we are building an ESP8266 Development Board which lets the user make connection to ESP8266 from a PIC microcontroller and their PC. The board also provides all the needs to be used as microcontroller peripherals such as LCD display, pusbuttons, indicator LEDs and GPIO extension. The PC connection is done by the help of FT232RL USB-UART converter over a Mini-USB connector. Since the PIC microcontroller used is a 5V chip, 5V-3.3V bi-directional level converter circuits are also included on the board.

DIY ESP8266 Development Board – [Link]

14 Apr 2015

IMG_20140820_092830

by programmablehardware.blogspot.ie:

This chimera is a microcontroller emulation of a UK101, an 8-bit microcomputer from the early 1980s. Needless to say I had one; it is a shocking thirty-three years since, as a spotty teenager, I soldered one together over the course of a few days. I recall the kit cost the equally shocking sum of £99.95 (a lot of pocket-money), and had to be smuggled through Irish customs in my parents’ car because the Single European Market was at that time merely a twinkle in M. Delors’ eye. In its original configuration it had 1k of user RAM, 1k of display RAM, 8k ROM Basic (from Microsoft) and a 2k ROM monitor. When it went to its present resting place in the attic a couple of years later, it had 16k of user RAM, 2k of display RAM and an additional 6k of utility ROM, all piggy-backed on the original chips.

8080 on a Stellaris Launchpad – [Link]

14 Apr 2015

Use_ESP8266_module_as_a_wireless_switcher-600x216

Razvan Dubau over at Extragsm posted a how-to on using an ESP8266 module as a wireless switcher:

A custom firmware to transform the ESP8266 wifi module into a wifi http based switcher GPIO02 is used as an output pin. You can connect a led or a relay and control it by a button added to GPIO00. Also the firmware provides a web interface and a simple API that will controll the GPIO02 state.

Use ESP8266 module as a wireless switcher – [Link]


14 Apr 2015

Boards-600x383

Peter Scargill writes:

If you’ve read my early blogs you’ll know I do a lot of work with a pal of mine, Aidan Ruff. We had an R&D company for years and one of our products was a home control system which was plastered all over the UK tech press at the time and loads of people loved it but it involved spouse-unfriendly WIRES – bad mistake. Well, this DOESN’T.

The two of us have been working on home control for several years and regular readers will know that in the past few months, the ESP8266 boards have turned everything around. I’ve scrapped various radio designs and gone “hell for leather” into using these boards, this original plan was with an Arduino Mega as a “master controller”. That too went out of the window when the Raspberry Pi 2 came out, dirt cheap but with more than enough power to control a house. Armed with a WIFI USB dongle, the basics of a completely wireless home control setup are now in place. Personally it could not be better timed as we’re moving house shortly and so this is an ideal opportunity to do the job properly before inflicting this on other people.

Home Control 2015 – [Link]

7 Apr 2015

KSC-LoRa

by elektor.com:

KCS BV, based in Dordrecht (NL) has extended their successful TraceME product line with an advanced module, targeted for worldwide mobility in the Internet of Things era.

The latest development of the TraceME GPS/GPRS Track and Trace module will combine the RF location based positioning solution with the LoRa™ technology. This combination offers ‘smart objects’ being even smarter, since LoRa™ enables long range, battery friendly communication in a wide variety of (M2M) applications.

Supporting GPRS/SMS and optional 3G, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth LE, ANT/ANT+ and iBeacon™ provides easy integration with existing wireless networks and mobile apps. The module will be available in Q2/2015 and other variants in the high/mid-range and budget-line will follow shortly after.

KCS TraceME expands Internet of Things era by integrating LoRa™ – [Link]

6 Apr 2015

ESPToy1.2-600x224

Ray Wang from RaysHobby has written an article on his ESPToy 1.2, a ESP8266 development board based on the Lua firmware:

A little while back I released the very first version of ESPToy — a ESP8266 Development Board with a few useful on-board components like color LED, button, and temperature sensor. It has a built-in ATmega644 microcontroller, and pin headers for plugging in a ESP-01 through-hole WiFI module. Shortly after that, I discovered the Lua firmware (named nodemcu) for ESP8266. At first I didn’t pay much attention — Lua is a new language that I’ve never used before, and I wasn’t sure if it’s worth my time learning about it. At the same time I was getting tired of the AT firmware (the original firmware that comes with ESP), partly because it’s not very stable, and partly because it’s complicated to use and involves an extra microcontroller to communicate with it.

[via]

Introducing ESPToy 1.2 (with Lua Firmware) – [Link]

30 Mar 2015

dream-1

Eco-Inspired 32-bit microcontroller chip for Wearables and the Internet-of-Things.

DREAM-1 is a Next-Generation, Eco-Inspired 32-bit microcontroller chip for Wearables and the Internet-of-Things;
No limitations – powered by Eco-Logic technology: minimal energy, maximum speed, event-driven, instantaneously responsive and energy-performance adaptive;
Fully compatible – DREAM-1 apps can be developed with existing software flows, programming languages and configured wirelessly over Bluetooth;
Exclusive – limited sampling batch only available on Kickstarter to perfect its design.

32-bit Microcontroller Chip – Next-Generation, Eco-Inspired – [Link]

26 Mar 2015

msp432-bd-lg

by Richard Quinnell @ edn.com

Texas Instruments has launched the MSP-432, a Cortex-M-based microcontroller that aims at providing developers with a higher-performance upgrade path for MSP-430 users while still retaining low-power operation. The 32-bit processor uses an M4F core with FPU and DSP extensions, achieving a CoreMark score of 3.41/MHz and a certified ULPBench score of 167.4, among the highest in its performance class.

The device can operate at full speed down to a supply of 1.62V, simplifying direct sensor interface. It specs an operating current of 95 µA/MHz and a sleep mode current of 850 nA with its real-time clock running. The device also contains a number of architectural features that support reduced power consumption while boosting performance.

MCU blends low power and high performance – [Link]

24 Mar 2015

Untitled-1

mbugs™ – the building blocks of an integrated ecosystem for the mbed online IDE that enables form-factor electronics prototyping.

The mbug ecosystem uses the mbed online compiler and SDK where you can quickly create embedded applications that are easily downloaded onto the mbug processor through a standard USB interface, just like adding a file to a USB flash drive.

In addition to the processor mbugs which run the applications, we’re offering a number of expansion mbugs that can be stacked onto the processor to create multifunctional systems. Together, you can use mbugs to build projects containing sensors, displays, relays, and servo motors.

mbugs – rapid-prototyping electronics for hobbyists and pros – [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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