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21 Feb 2015

miniscope_v2e_pcb3

by Tomasz Ostrowski @ tomeko.net:

Extremely cheap low-speed PC/USB oscilloscope with STM32 (STM32F042) microcontroller.

Announced in January 2014 Cortex-M0 microcontroller family that features crystal-less USB FS device allows to cut noticeable part of BOM when building oscilloscope/recorder similar to miniscope v2c/v2d. STM32F042F devices are interesting in particular because of small and friendly TSSOP20 package with minimum number or power lines.

STM32F042F4 devices feature USB bootloader (DFU), single 1MSps ADC (so single channel sampling would be preferred to avoid crosstalk issues), 16 kB FLASH memory (~2 times more than needed) and 6 kB RAM.

Miniscope v2e – STM32F042 Oscilloscope - [Link]

20 Feb 2015

onion

Onion is launching the Omega, a hardware development board designed for software hackers (especially Web) with limited experience in hardware development. It is a tiny computer (1/5 the size of the raspberry pi) with built-in WiFi and Linux. The Omega allows software developers create hardware projects in familiar environments (ssh, git and npm) and using high-level programming languages they are used to, such as Python, Node.JS, PHP, etc. More importantly, the Omega is fully integrated into the Onion cloud service, allowing hackers to prototype IoT applications very quickly.

Onion Omega – An invention platform for the Internet of Things - [Link]

 

19 Feb 2015

web-server-esp8266

by Rui Santos @ randomnerdtutorials.com:

If you want to learn more about the ESP8266 module, first read my Getting Started Guide for the ESP8266 WiFi Module. In this project you’ll create a standalone web server with an ESP8266 that can toggle two LEDs.

Why flashing your ESP8266 module with NodeMCU?

NodeMCU is a firmware that allows you to program the ESP8266 modules with LUA script. And you’ll find it very similar to the way you program your Arduino. With just a few lines of code you can establish a WiFi connection, control the ESP8266 GPIOs, turning your ESP8266 into a web server and a lot more.

ESP8266 Web Server Tutorial - [Link]

12 Feb 2015

1pic-600x337

Markus Gritsch shared his WiFi LED light project in the dangerousprototypes forum:

I built a prototype for a WiFi controllable LED light, using the popular ESP8266 module running the NodeMCU firmware [1]. To allow controlling the WS2812B LEDs from Lua, I extended the firmware with a bit of C code

WiFi LED Light (ESP8266 + WS2812B + Lua) - [Link]


10 Feb 2015

tinybt

The Zero Tiny BLE is a small low cost and low powered embeddable board with an AVR ATTiny85 microcontroller and a Bluetooth 4.0 (Bluetooth Low Energy or BLE) radio.
AVR ATTiny85 microcontroller running at 8MHz internal clock and 3.3V. ATTiny85 Datasheet.

HM-10 Bluetooth 4.0 Low Energy module. HM-10 Datasheet.
Powered by single cell 3.7V Lithium Polymer battery (LiPo) or USB B mini port.
LiPo battery recharge capabilities via the USB B mini port.
Standard UART communication over Bluetooth 4.0.
Easy prototyping via breadboard.
Use either Arduino or AVR-GCC development environments.
Small form factor of 20mm x 47mm (0.79” x 1.85”)
You can purchase a complete board at zeroengineering.io
You can order unpopulated boards from OSH Park

Zero Tiny BLE – low cost and low powered embeddable board - [Link]

10 Feb 2015

DSC04477-624x468

by Jesus Echavarria :

Hi all! With a bit of delay, here’s my last work, a PICnano breadboard based on the PIC18F2550 microcontroller. I have in mind a new project and I want to use an small board, like the Arduino Nano board. This new project is battery powered (3,7V Li-Ion battery). After checking the schematics of the Arduino Nano, I see that the microcontroler is powered at 5V. Of course, I can unmount the linear regulator (U3) that is on the board, and bypass the VIN to the microcontroller power supply. But I think it’s funny try to develop a new module when you’ve access to the microcontroller power supply! Also, I want to work with PIC microcontrollers after many years, so here’s what I design!

PICnano breadboard based on PIC18F2550 - [Link]

9 Feb 2015

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

by tim.jagenberg.info:

I recently bumped into NodeMCU firmware for the ESP8266. It’s an Lua interpreter, making tinkering with IoT ideas really simple. Just flash the firmware onto the ESP8266 and connect via serial console. You can start prototyping right away using the interactive Lua interpreter. You can easily persist your ideas on a simple flash file system.

Low Power ESP8266 – Sleeping at 78 micro Amps - [Link]

8 Feb 2015

atmega128_diy_development_board

by Radu Motisan @ pocketmagic.net:

For many of my previous projects I used AVR Microcontrollers extensively. I started with the Atmega8 and moved to superior AVR variants depending on the application complexity and requirements. Before designing any particular application, I usually do my research on a development board. It is a PCB featuring the target microcontroller and minimal support logic that usually covers a regulated power supply, pin headers to connect peripherals and/or a few LEDs used for basic debugging.

Such boards are available in many shapes and colours, from simple to complex and most of the times they are affordable (after all we’re talking about a minimal PCB with a microcontroller and a few, mostly passive, components).

DIY AVR Development Board with Atmega128 - [Link]

7 Feb 2015

ac-wattmeter-intro

by electro-labs.com:

Have you ever been curious about the power consumption of an appliance? For example did you wonder how much it will cost you to leave your television in standby mode whole night? Or did you want to learn how much change your refrigerator settings will make on your electric bill? If your answer is yes, you can use a wattmeter to measure the power consumption of a device. In this project we are building one.

This is an AC Watt Meter which can measure the real power consumption of a device connected to the 230Vrms/50Hz mains line. The PIC microcontroller collects the voltage and the current information with the help of ADCs and then calculates the RMS voltage of the mains line, RMS current drawn by the device and the resulting average power consumption. All these information is then displayed on the dot matrix LCD.

DIY Digital AC Watt Meter - [Link]

4 Feb 2015

teensylc_front_pinout

Teensy-LC (Low Cost) is a powerful 32 bit microcontroller board, with a rich set of hardware peripherals, at a very affordable price!

Teensy-LC delivers an impressive collection of capabilities to make modern electronic projects simpler. It features an ARM Cortex-M0+ processor at 48 MHz, 62K Flash, 8K RAM, 12 bit analog input & output, hardware Serial, SPI & I2C, USB, and a total of 27 I/O pins. See the technical specifications and pinouts below for details.

Teensy-LC maintains the same form-factor as Teensy 3.1, with most pins offering similar peripheral features.

Teensy LC – Coming March 2015 - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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