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19 Aug 2014

OpenHardwareExG

OpenHardwareExG, An open source platform for ECG, EEG, EMG, ENG, and EOG signal processing:

The OpenHardwareExG is a platform for ECG, EEG, EMG, ENG, EOG, and evoked potential applications.

The OpenHardwareExG platform was originally developed as part of the eeg-mouse project.

Project goals
The main goal of the project is to build a device that allows the creation of electrophysiologic signal processing applications. In addition:
Hardware and software that we develop will have a free/open source license. We also prefer to use hardware and software that are free/open source.
We would like to keep the hardware DIY compatible (hand solderable, with parts that are readily available in small quantities, etc.)
For us, this is a hobby and learning project. It’s important to keep it fun, and take the time to learn along the way.

[via]

OpenHardwareExG: An open source platform for ECG, EEG, EMG, ENG, and EOG signal processing - [Link]

13 Aug 2014

microchip2

by elektor.com:

Microchip Technology Inc has introduced a PIC32 Bluetooth starter kit. The kit includes a board with a PIC32 microcontroller, HCI-based Bluetooth radio, Cree high-output multi-color LED, 3 standard single-color LEDs, an analog 3-axis accelerometer, analog temperature sensor and 5 push buttons for user-defined inputs. In addition the PICkit™ On Board (PKOB) eliminates the need for an external debugger/programmer and supports USB connectivity and GPIOs for rapid development of Bluetooth Serial Port Profile (SPP), USB and general-purpose applications. To support Bluetooth audio the starter kit also includes an interface for a plug-in audio CODEC daughter card set for release at a later stage.

Microchip Bluetooth Starter Kit - [Link]

13 Aug 2014

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by Joel Williams @ joelw.id.au:

I bought Avnet’s $49 Spartan 3A development board but it was discontinued not long afterward – right about the time when I decided I needed a few dozen more. I’ve since done some extensive research (thanks, Google!) to find a comparable thrifty thrill.

When choosing a development board, consider what you get with it and what you want to use it for. FPGAs are ideal for use with high speed peripherals, and in general it is much easier to buy a board that contains the part you want, rather than trying to add one on later (and inevitably giving up and upgrading to a more capable board).

Cheap FPGA Development Boards – What to look for - [Link]

12 Aug 2014

microcomputers_yun

by TONY DICOLA @ learn.adafruit.com:

Have you heard about small Linux-based development boards like the Raspberry Pi or Beaglebone Black, but been confused about which one is best for you? This guide will compare the specifications, performance, power usage, and development experience of four popular Linux-based development boards to help you choose which is right for you!

Embedded Linux Board Comparison - [Link]


9 Aug 2014

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Ralph Doncaster writes:

Several months ago I noticed the Attiny88. It has several more I/O than the Atmega328, with an extra Port A and PC7. And unlike most of the other Attiny series, it has real SPI instead of USI, so libraries using SPI don’t have to be re-written. At just 86c for qty 1, it is the also the cheapest AVR with 8KB flash. Since QFP-32 parts aren’t easy to work with, I searched for breakout boards and found QFP32 to DIP32 boards that would allow me to use them in a small breadboard.

[via]

Breaking out a QFP Attiny88 AVR - [Link]

30 Jul 2014

photo-main

An interesting open source NFC project is seeking for funding on kickstarter.

MicroNFCBoard is an integrated development platform that makes it easy to use Near Field Communication or NFC (What is NFC? see below for more info). It contains a NFC transceiver, a microcontroller and all the software you need to use NFC.

It can be used with an Arduino, Raspberry Pi, mbed or PC/Mac. There is also a powerful ARM Cortex-M0 microcontroller onboard so it can work on its own and you can connect a bunch of things to the board using its various peripherals.

MicroNFCBoard – Easy NFC for the Internet of Things - [Link]

13 Jul 2014

11bgas

by Henrik’s Blog @ hforsten.com:

All of the best integrated circuits today come in hard to solder BGA packages. Because BGA packages have connections under the chip soldering is harder and it needs to be done using a reflow oven or hot plate. Another problem is with designing the PCB, vias and traces need to be small enough to fit between the solder balls and there needs to be usually quite many layers in the board to make room for all the closely packed traces. This means that a cheap Chinese two layer board doesn’t have enough room and more layers are needed. Adding layers increases the cost of the board dramatically when ordering only a few copies.

Making embedded Linux computer - [Link]

13 Jul 2014

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Dan over at HackAday documented his single chip computer project with the PCBs from DirtyPCBs:

A single AVR microcontroller (the ATmega 1284P) has been used to create a standalone computer system which runs the BASIC programming language. The 1284P runs TinyBASIC Plus, generates RCA video signals (using TVout) and reads PS/2 keyboard input. A single sided PCB was used to hold all the components meaning it is easy to manufacture the computer at home using processes such as photo-etching. Additionally, the component count is fairly low and only one IC is required (the 1284P).

[via]

Single chip AVR BASIC computer - [Link]

10 Jul 2014

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Chris Holden of NerdClub shares his tips on how he successfully program an ATMega128:

Finally got an ATMega128 chip coded and programmed successfully. The great news is it doesn’t require Arduino. The even better news is, we can use Oshonsoft to write the code! Yay.

[via]

Programming an ATMega128 - [Link]

5 Jul 2014

Lat

Michael Dunn @ edn.com writes:

Whether engineer, hobbyist, or maker, we’ve happily watched as chipmakers and third parties alike have come to their senses in recent years and cooked up a smorgasbord (smorgasboard?) of low-cost microcontroller devboards – in some cases, very low cost, like TI’s $4.30 MSP430 board. More recently, we’ve seen ARM Cortex kits for $10-$50, the flowering of the whole Arduino ecosystem, and of course, the Raspberry Pi, starting at $25. It’s microcontroller heaven.

Those of us wanting a cheap “in” to the FPGA world have been less lucky. But the times, they are a changin’. Many FPGA devkits, from both chipmakers and third parties, have broken – or downright shattered – the $100 barrier, opening the door to low-cost FPGA prototyping, education, hobby projects, and so on.

Follow me as I explore this brave new world of affordable FPGA learning and design. I’ve acquired a representative selection of bargain-priced boards, and will be reviewing each, not just on paper, but by actually creating projects with it.

FPGA boards under $100: Introduction - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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