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4 Nov 2014

avrmontagewhitein1

Use a $4 microcontroller to launch web pages with the push of a button over serial I/O.. by Elliot Williams @ makezine.com:

A microcontroller is a self-contained, but very limited computer — halfway between a computer and a component.

The top reasons to integrate a microcontroller into your projects are connectivity and interactivity, and one easy way to get your microcontroller talking with the outside world is standard asynchronous serial I/O. Many devices can communicate this way, from wi-fi routers to GPS units to your desktop or laptop computer. Getting comfortable with serial I/O makes debugging your AVR programs much easier because the AVR can finally talk to you, opening up a huge opportunity for awesome.

Beyond the Arduino IDE: AVR USART Serial - [Link]

4 Nov 2014

8_Channel_Relay_Pic_th

8 Channel Relay Board is a simple and convenient way to interface 8 relays for switching application in your project. Input voltage level support TTL as well as CMOS. Easy interface with Microcontrollers based projects and analog circuits.

8 Channel Relay Board - [Link]

3 Nov 2014

vVSgaP5

by fobit.blogspot.com:

Hey all, this is my first post on this blog, so I’d like to say hello! I’m Ian M, a high school student who likes breaking(/fixing(/breaking again)) electronic stuff. I was just sitting around, and I wanted to see how cheap I could make a usb avr isp programmer. I based the design off of http://www.simpleavr.com/avr/vusbtiny, which is based off of the original UsbTinyIsp. For the firmware, I just took their firmware and re-compiled it. The source is available at http://www.simpleavr.com/avr/vusbtiny/vusbtiny.tgz?attredirects=0. Their post uses 3 resistors, 2 diodes, 1 capacitor, and an MCU. I thought I could do better. Turns out you don’t need two of the resistors, or the diode. My schematics are released into the public domain, and the original code stays under its original licence (which I don’t exactly know what it is, but I bet it’s in the readme).

Tiny, Tiny, AVR Programmer - [Link]

31 Oct 2014

tinyloadr-600x653

by Jeff Murchison @ murchlabs.com:

I finally finished the next version of my TinyLoadr AVR programming Shield – and it’s not a shield. It’s a standalone USB programmer, so you no longer have to have an extra Arduino laying around. The best part? It’s the same price as the shield was!

[via]

TinyLoadr AVR Programmer - [Link]


28 Oct 2014

DI5460f1

by Benabadji Noureddine @ edn.com:

Several previously published Design Ideas and appnotes [1-4] show how to use many pushbuttons with a minimum number of inputs. They require an RC circuit where the timing can be measured to identify which pushbutton has been pressed, or an ADC input, with resistors forming a divider for each pushbutton pressed.

The following Design Idea shows another simple way to use up to 15 pushbuttons with only one I/O. The microcontroller chosen must contain an internal comparator with selectable values for the internal voltage reference VREF.

Monitor 15 contacts with one PIC input - [Link]

24 Oct 2014

5

by staringlizard.com:

This project was made in the memory of my old computer that I played around with as a young boy. I have a lot to thank this machine for, among other things it made me understand what I wanted to do with my life. So in this project I created software and hardware to make it possible to play those wonderful games yet again.

Hardware is really fun! I enjoy doing PCB designs for projects like these. This is why I decided to create a board for this project to see if I could produce something that would suffice to run the emulation good enough. The SID chip was the crown jewel for this board, no doubt about it :)

The pich for the HW chip was sometimes below 0.5 which made soldering a bitch to be honest. But with some patience, sweat and alot of flux it was indeed possible.

Memwa – a C64 Emulated on a STM32 - [Link]

17 Oct 2014

ATTiny2313-development-board-600x450

Baoshi of DigitalMe wrote an article detailing his minimalism ATTiny2313 development board build:

The AVR chip I’m talking about is Atmel ATTiny2313, in SOIC-20 package. To make the development board, I bought some 28 pin SOIC/SSOP to DIP adapters. These adaptors usually come in double sided design. Corresponding pins on both sides are connected via the plated through holes at edges.
I made a 2×3 AVR programming header by pulling off pins (longer ones) from a double-row right angle pin header and reinsert them into the plastic base. A needle nose pliers is very handy for this purpose.

[via]

Minimalism AVR development board - [Link]

10 Oct 2014

DK_MCU_Oct_Fig1A_WM

by Warren Miller @ digikey.com:

MCUs offer a very wide range of Ethernet connectivity choices. With most applications demanding Internet connectivity, it’s more likely than not that your next MCU-based design will need some type of network connection. Whether your next design is a sensor that needs to consolidate and communicate data over an Ethernet link, a network-connected security camera that needs to have periodic code updates sent via the network connection, or an industrial controller that needs to use a robust industrial Ethernet connection, your choice of Ethernet-enabled MCU will be critical in delivering the capabilities required for a successful design.

Understanding and Using Ethernet-enabled MCUs for Your Next Application – [Link]

9 Oct 2014

15-SMD28

embedded-lab.com writes:

TI’s MSP430 family of MCUs are low-power and RISC-based powerful mixed-signal processors that require a Flash Emulator Tool (FET) for in-system programming. The official MSP430 FET from TI costs about $100. Vincete describes a way to construct a MSP430 FET using TI’s popular and in-expensive Launchpad board.

MSP430 FET using TI Launchpad - [Link]

7 Oct 2014

DSC04607-1024x768

by jechavarria.com:

I’m continuing working with Juan Brito and Danny Macancela from the blog Desafio Ecuador, developing new boards to bring near the technology and programming languages. Our last work is a board to use with the Raspberry Pi and focused to learn Python. The board has the basic elements to start with this language. Also, with the develop of the PCB we remove the wiring, avoiding troubles with connections, inversion polarity…So with this board you only focused in the software develop, because the hardware side will work!

RPi Board, a board to learn Python with the Raspberry Pi - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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