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31 Mar 2014

SerialMonitor

ARPix has posted this instructable on constructing an external serial monitor device using the Atmega328 MCU and a graphic LCD. It allows a user interface to set the serial baud rate and start/stop functions using tact switches.

Sometimes I needed an external serial monitor like the Serial Monitor in the Arduino Editor, to see what is going on. So I made one. For the ESM I used an Atmel Atmega328 because it have an internal SRAM with 2KBytes. It’s necessary for the big data processing. So you need more than 1KByte SRAM.

[via]

Constructing an external serial monitor - [Link]

17 Mar 2014

rtc_3

luca @ lucadentella.it build a nice app that let you configure an RTC chip using a PC GUI and your Arduino board. The system is composed by two elements, the PC GUI written in C# and a sketch running on Arduino. The RTC is connected on the Arduino using I2C interface and Arduino is connected to PC using a simple serial protocol.

I chose to use the Adafruit’s RTClib library to talk with the DS1307 chip, that is for sure one of the most used RTC in the hobbistic world. The connection between the IC and Arduino is established using the I2C bus.

RTCSetup – configure an RTC chip using your PC - [Link]

7 Oct 2013

noloop-serial-front-small

Bertho shared his NoLoop galvanic isolator:

I had a problem some time ago with a nasty ground-loop and that cost me the USB port on my old laptop. It took me a while to realize what had happened and it was a generic problem we all run into more often than we think. Time to solve this particular problem once and for all and make generic isolation for Serial and SPI ports.

[via]

NoLoop galvanic isolator - [Link]

6 Aug 2013

usb-2-serial-ftdi

Another low component count USB to serial converter module is based on the FT230XS from FTDI Chip. The FT230XS is outfitted in SSOP-16 packaging. The first incarnation of FT230X chips got a nasty bug when the chip inadvertently goes into suspend mode triggered by certain byte sequences. The FT230X releases A, B and C were affected, see FTDI Chip TN_139 Technical Note. The resistor R1 connected to CBUS3 pin is providing workaround, keeping the chip awake. The Eagle projects files are here.

USB to Serial Breakout Board for FTDI FT230X - [Link]


24 Feb 2013

usb-2-serial

asidorenk @ obddiag.net pointed us to this great little USB to Serial board:

This USB to serial (TTL) converter project is easy to build, it is simple and inexpensive. It is based on the PL2303SA USB to USART bridge from Prolific. The PL2303SA chip is not required an external crystal as the internal clock oscillator is continuously tuning up to USB bus frequency. Having chip in SO-8 packaging does not require special soldering skills to assemble the project. Please note: the TX and RX signal levels are 3.3 Volts.

USB to Serial Breakout Board for Prolific PL2303SA - [Link]

22 Oct 2012

dangerousprototypes.com writes:

Ray reports he’s just finished working on a new open source wearable electronics controller board called SquareWear. It’s small (1.6″x1.6″) and has built-in USB port (used for programming the microcontroller, USB serial communication, and charging battery). It also has 4 on-board MOSFETs for switching high-current load (up to 500mA). The board is based on Microchip’s PIC18F14k50, and includes a SquareWear library to make it as easy to use as Arduino. Check out RaysHobby website for the source code and programming guide.

SquareWear open source controller board - [Link]

 

20 Sep 2012

This table provides top-level characteristics for serial interface standards by which two or more digital devices can be connected for communication. Design engineers can use the table to compare interface options for their application based on the design constraints like number of signal lines, network size, speed, distance, noise immunity, fault tolerance and reliability.

Serial Data Communication Protocols Comparizon - [Link]

7 Sep 2012

The wireless modem you’ve been waiting for. Works with Arduino & other micros. Open source mesh networking base. FCC Certified. Cheap. Eric Gnoske writes:

So who’s behind RadioBlocks? A group of engineers who have worked on many aspects of low-power radio devices. A group of engineers who time & time again saw customers coming to us with similar requests, but with no way for us to easily fill them. So we created RadioBlocks to allow people to easily drop a radio link into their project, hence “RadioBlocks” – A simple to use radio building block.

Sure there are lots of radio boards out there. Most have two modes: super-simple serial-port replacement mode, and complex full network mode. Neither of those are useful – most people want to send some data between some devices. They need more than serial-port replacement, but the full network mode is too much hassle. Then many of those radio devices are just too expensive – are you really going to drop $30 or $40 on a single radio node, then buy extra hardware so you can attach sensors? Good luck with that!

RadioBlock: Simple Radio for Arduino or any Embedded System - [Link]

27 Jun 2012

This article focuses on how to listen for signals from an Arduino through the Serial Port (Linux, Mac) or COM Port for Windows using the SerialPort2 Node.JS module and serve signal data to the web in real time using Socket.IO. [via]

Arduino and the Web using NodeJS and SerialPort2 - [Link]

20 Jun 2012

Open source application for charting data sent via RS-232 port in real time.

SerialChart – Analyse and chart serial data from RS-232 COM ports - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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