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17 Sep 2013

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Electric Imp Solar Powered Temperature Logger

The first hack I did with the imp was a solar powered temperature logger using a TMP36 sensor and send the data to ThingSpeak

Electric Imp Solar Powered Temperature Logger - [Link]

13 Sep 2013

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Scott Harden writes:

In an effort to resume previous work [A, B, C, D] on developing a crystal oven for radio frequency transmitter / receiver stabilization purposes, the first step for me was to create a device to accurately measure and log temperature.  I did this with common, cheap components, and the output is saved to the computer (over 1,000 readings a second). Briefly, I use a LM335 precision temperature sensor ($0.70 on mouser) which outputs voltage with respect to temperature.

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Precision temperature measurement - [Link]

5 Sep 2013

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Make a WiFi Weather Station With Arduino and Adafruit’s CC3000 breakout.

As open-source hardware users and makers, we love playing with new chips, boards and tools. And there is one chip which is quite popular these days: the CC3000 WiFi chip from TI. This chip comes with many promises: cheap (around $10), easy to use, low-power … It was featured in many articles around the web, but somehow it was quite hard to use with Arduino as there was no breakout board or library available. Luckily, Adafruit solved that for us with a nice breakout board and a working library for Arduino. In this article, I will show you how to use this chip for home automation purposes. Remember that weather station project? We are going to do the same: measure the temperature and the humidity. But this time we won’t display the information on an LCD screen. Instead, we will transmit the data wirelessly via WiFi to your computer and display it there. Excited ? Let’s get started!

Make a WiFi Weather Station With Arduino and Adafruit’s CC3000 breakout - [Link]

2 Sep 2013

Maxim’s Collection of temperature sensor and thermostat ICs

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These temperature sensors offer good accuracy (±1.5°C) over the range of -25°C to +125°C and feature a 2-wire digital output with bus lockup protection and external reset.

30f4437aebdf7022dec58c474596e4d2This is a 5-channel temperature monitor IC. It contains it’s own local temperature sensor plus has the ability to monitor 4 additional remote temperature sensors.

6f1b2223ef4c1c350f1c70c1f317eb7eVery accurate temperature measurements over the range of -40°C to +105°C. Provides an I2C digital interface and an overtemperature alarm.

cae5b1b29bdcde1c4d9de4b5b375c9c9Accuracy of ±0.5°C from 0 to 70°C, this temperature sensor provides non-volatile thermostat thresholds. Output is digital via a 2-wire or 3-wire serial bus.

 


19 Aug 2013

LM35

Tushar @ embedds.com writes:

In this new tutorial, we will be interfacing a LM35 based temperature sensor with ATMEGA32. The 3 main types are thermometers, resistance temperature detectors, and thermocouples. All three of these sensors measure a physical property (i.e. volume of a liquid, current through a wire), which changes as a function of temperature. In addition to the 3 main types of temperature sensors, there are numerous other temperature sensors available for use.

Interfacing LM35 to ATMEGA32 - [Link]

11 Aug 2013

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Digital Temperature Sensor in TO-92 Package Ideal for Measuring Ambient Temperature.

The MAX31820 ambient temperature sensor provides 9-bit to 12-bit Celsius temperature measurements with ±0.5°C accuracy over a +10°C to +45°C temperature range. Over its entire -55°C to +125°C operating range, the device has ±2.0°C accuracy.

MAX31820 – 1-Wire Ambient Temperature Sensor - [Link]

27 Jul 2013

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Gina Roos writes:

One of the biggest challenges faced by solid-state lighting designers is reliability. Electrical and thermal conditions are two major factors affecting device life and lighting output and, while long life is a key benefit of LEDs compared to incandescent and fluorescent light sources, all bets are off if the LEDs exceed their temperature ratings.

Thermal management continues to vex LED lighting designers, particularly for high brightness LEDs that continue to escalate in forward current while decreasing in package size. Couple this with potentially high-temperature applications such as streetlights and high-bay lighting in warehouses, and it becomes apparent that there is a major hurdle to overcome.

With an estimated 20 percent of global energy used for lighting, LED driver suppliers are more than aware of these challenges and are starting to integrate thermal foldback control into some of their designs to protect LEDs from failure and reduced lifetime due to high-temperature environments. Thermal foldback limits the LED temperature to protect against failure by reducing the LED current as the ambient temperature increases; this arrangement continues to decrease the current until the LED junction temperature returns to a safe operating temperature. The result is higher reliability, longer operating life, and, in some cases, increased safety.

How Thermal Foldback Improves the Reliability of LED Lighting Fixtures - [Link]

23 Jul 2013

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tvdl @ instructables.com writes:

This is a small project to get you started with the electric imp and a Thermistor so you can see how you can get temperature readings updating live on a web site. This instructable will address both the hardware and the web site along with all the parts in between. I’ve tried to keep it as simple as possible which means there are plenty of ways you can expand on it.

The first part will address the electric imp and how we connect a resistor and Thermistor to create a very simple circuit called a voltage divider and use the imp’s built in analog to digital converter to take a reading and calculate what the temperature is. I’ll also go into some detail on how the circuit and it’s components work.

Simple wireless temperature sensor updating web site with Electric Imp and Thermistor - [Link]

22 Jul 2013

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Ktulu_1 @ instructables.com writes:

The temperature in my office at work varies quite a bit depending on the time of day, season, and the whims of the other people I share the floor with. When I’m sitting at my desk shaking uncontrollably or sweating profusely it would be nice to know if it’s due to the temperature or just work related stress. A simple $5.00 thermometer would suffice, but where’s the fun in that? Making my own thermometer might cost ten times as much, but I might learn something in the process and it would be way cooler than any cheap store bought thing? I’d rather make something myself even if I have to pay a “maker’s premium.”

Tempduino – Arduino Based Temp and Humidity Display - [Link]

6 Mar 2013

I2CBoard3

This tiny little breakout board has Microchip’s 24LC512 EEPROM and MCP9802 temperature sensor devices, both of which support I2C protocol. This board can be used for both sensing the ambient temperature and storing it. The MCP9802 is a digital temperature sensor with an user-selectable resolution from 9 to 12 bit. It can measure temperature ranging from -55°C to +125°C and notifies the host microcontroller when the ambient temperature exceeds a user programmed set point through its ALERT output pin. This board allows you to store up to 32000 temperature samples when you use the sensor in high resolution mode (12-bit, 0.0625°C) with each sample stored as two bytes. Raj (from embedded-lab.com) is selling this board for $9.00 on Tindie.

I2C EEPROM plus Temperature Sensor breakout board - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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