PICTIL – Remake of the TIL311 hex LED display

Yann Guidon @ hackaday.io rebuild the TIL311 hexadecimal display using a pic microcontroller. He writes:

The TIL311 is a nice but expensive, obsolete, power-hungry hexadecimal display. It would be cool to make a tiny module with similar functionality which solves its shortcomings. A 20-pins PIC is a solution but other decoding chips could work too. The PIC16F527 is one of the cheapest 20-pins PICs (sub-dollar), but it can’t implement the latch pin as fast as the original TIL311.

PICTIL – Remake of the TIL311 hex LED display – [Link]

RX/TX sequencer

Lukas Fässler has designed and built an RX/TX sequencer based on a PIC16F18325,  that is available on github:

Much like the beacon keyer presented here earlier, this RX/TX sequencer is a simple but useful little device. Its typical use is in ham radio applications when a separate power amplifier (PA) and/or a sensitive low-noise pre-amplifier (LNA) is used. Care has then to be take to safely transition between RX and TX states – and that’s where this sequencer comes in.

RX/TX sequencer – [Link]

SystemView PRO – Analyze your Firmware Behavior Like a PRO

Segger Microcontroller is known for J-Links device about debugging and programming lots of architectures: ARM, Microchip PIC32 and Renesas RX. Segger provides a lot of other software and hardware tools for debugging and programming purposes; SystemView is one of these tools.

SystemView gives a complete insight of what is going inside the MCU graphically and in real time. All recorded data is fetched using J-link adapter with no extra hardware or extra pins. SystemView app requires small software module (< 2 KB) to be included in the device.

SystemView app GUI

The SystemView module collects the data and passes it to Real Time Transfer (RTT). The RTT module stores the data in the device buffer, which enables continuous recording. SystemView has the ability of analyzing which interrupts, tasks and software timers executed, how many times and when.

Segger announced a new PRO version for SystemView; with unlimited recording and creating custom filters for event, SystemView PRO extends the normal version. However, the free version “SystemView” is limited up to 1 million event recording and analyzing. Last but not least, buying the PRO version costs about 1,200 USD. Another option, is that you can purchase a J-Link and it will be shipped with a SEGGER SystemView PRO license (seems more economical option) .

Source: electropages

SHA2017 Badge — A Hackable Conference Badge with E-paper Display

The hackable electronic conference badges are more and more being adapted in technical conferences and especially those for hackers and makers. These badges can be reprogrammed easily and could be used later as a development board.

It’s not the first time to hear about a hackable badge; for example, Parallax has an open source one with lots of features like: exchanging contact information over infrared, accelerometer, A/V jack and more. The badge can be programmed via USB using Propeller’s Spin (Propeller Tool or Propeller IDE) or C (Simple IDE) languages.

Parallax’s Hackable Electronic Badge — Image Courtesy of Parallax

New designs for badges show up from time to time. The team behind SHA2017 (a non profit outdoor Hacker camp taking place in The Netherlands in 2017 on August 4th to 8th) had developed their own badge.

SHA2017’s Badge — Image Courtesy of SHA2017

The new badge’s features:

  • E-ink9″ display.
  • Espressif ESP32 Wroom WiFi Module.
  • MPR121 Touch Sensor and GPIO expander.
  • TP4056 battery charger.
  • SD Card.
  • USB-UART bridge (converter).
  • ×6 RGB LEDs.

The team’s goal behind SHA2017 consists of two parts: “augment the event”, like reading the lecture subtitles live around your neck; and ”be a development platform” where you can find all the needed parts to write your own application using MicroPython.

EAGLE files and firmware can be found on Github.

Source: CNXSoft

MCUXpresso IDE: Blinky the NXP LPC800-DIP Board

Erich Styger @ mcuoneclipse.com has a series of tutorials using the new NXP MCUXpresso IDE. He writes:

During Embedded World 2017 in Nürnberg I was lucky to get a handful LPC800-DIP boards. To get all students who were lucky to get one, here is a tutorial to make that very exciting ‘blinky’ application on that board:

MCUXpresso IDE: Blinky the NXP LPC800-DIP Board – [Link]

Self-learning neuromorphic chip composes music

Peter Clarke @  eedesignnewseurope.com reporting:

Research institute IMEC has created a neuromorphic chip based on metal-oxide ReRAM technology that has the ability to self-learn. That self-learning has been applied to music making.

Self-learning neuromorphic chip composes music – [Link]

ABC: Basic Connections – The Essential Book for Makers

A collection of neat circuit diagrams that shows you how to properly connect almost anything to your Arduino compatible board. Live on kickstarter.

A DC Motor Controller with Control Leds

Boris Landoni writes about a new open source project a DC motor controller with control LEDs:

The circuit board we are presenting this time is based on the dual-bridge driver L298N, in a traditionally mounted version in a Multiwatt container with 15 staggered pins; it has two terminal blocks for attaching to DC motors or the coils of a bipolar stepper motor and a terminal block for powering logics and motors. Each of the two output channels of the circuit can provide a maximum current of 2 A, which is enough to drive two 2 A direct current motors or a bipolar stepper motor absorbing 2 A per phase.

A DC Motor Controller with Control Leds – [Link]

Adjustable constant current source

Dilshan Jayakody has published a new build:

The current source introduced in this article is capable to handle current up to 6A with maximum input voltage of 50V. This is an operational amplifier based adjustable current source and it uses LM358 in a general voltage follower configuration. To handle large currents we use four 0.1Ω 20W resistors as “load resistor”, and those load resistors are drive through pair of 55N06 N-channel MOSFET transistors.
The power supply unit of this project is build around 9V x 2 (2A) step-down transformer and it is design to get regulated 12V DC voltage. In our design this 12V power source is used to drive LM358 Op-Amp and 12V cooling fan.

Adjustable constant current source – [Link]