Mcu category

PICKit 3 Mini

Reviahh has published a new project, the PICKit 3 Mini:

Previously, I made a Pickit 3 clone – (see previous blog post). It works well, but I have often wondered just how little of its circuitry was needed to program and debug the boards I make. For instance – I primarily use the newer 3.3V PIC32 processors, so I really don’t need the ability to alter the voltage like the standard Pickit 3 can. I also have no real need for programming on the go, or even to provide power to the target MCU to program. Knowing this – I decided to see what I could do to remove the circuitry I didn’t need, yet still have a functioning programmer/debugger.

PICKit 3 Mini – [Link]

DSETA board with an AT89C51ED2

Jesus Echavarria tipped us with his latest DSETA board with an AT89C51ED2.

Some months ago I review the DSETA board due the obsolescence of the microcontroller. I use this board in some projects succesfully. But when I try to manufacture a batch of this boards, I found that the microcontroller (AT89C51RE2) was obsolete. So, the board needs an update to change the microcontroller and maintain most of the features that it has. Now that Microchip buys Atmel, obsolescence and samples will not be a problem.

To replace the RE2 microcontroller, I choose one very similar, the AT89C51ED2 microcontroller. Mainly because it shares most of features with the old one and footprint and pinout is almost the same, so replacement is relatively easy to do.

DSETA board with an AT89C51ED2 – [Link]

20 PIN PIC Development Board

Small size multipurpose 20 Pin PIC Micro-Controller development board, includes onboard 5V regulator, prototyping area and ICSP programing port. The board provided with few more components which includes 4 optocoupler, 2 LEDs connected to RA5, RC7 with series resistors, 2 tactile switches and 2 Trimmer Potentiometers.  These components help to implement Microchip’s AN1660 single phase AC Motor driver. Just need 3 Phase Inverter IPM module to complete the Motor driver, Code and documents can be obtained from Microchip website.  However these components can be used to implement other application or can be left unsoldered.

Features

  • Supply 7-12V DC
  • 20 PIN SO20 PIC16F1509 Micro-controller
  • On Board 5V Regulator
  • Connector for Microchip AN1660
  • CN5 5V Isolated supply required if Microchip AN1660 Used
  • On Board PIC programing ICSP port
  • Two Connected LED on RC7, RA5 port Pin

20 PIN PIC Development Board – [Link]

MaxProLogic: Ultra Low Cost FPGA Development Board

The MaxProLogic is the perfect FPGA project board for the student and hobbyist.

The MaxProLogic is an FPGA development board that is designed to be user friendly and a great introduction into digital design for anyone. The core of the MaxProLogic is the Altera MAX10 FPGA. This powerful chip has 4,000 Logic Elements and 200Kbits of Memory. The MAX10 is easily scalable from the entry level college student to the most advanced projects like an audio sound meter with FFT. Upon the many great features of the MaxProLogic is the MAX10 chip has a built in Flash for configuration and incorporates 8 channels of Analog to Digital Conversion. These two features alone create a far superior FPGA chip than any competitor on the market. It allows the user to create more diverse projects.

MaxProLogic: Ultra Low Cost FPGA Development Board – [Link]

LoFive – Tiny RISC-V Microcontroller Board

Small breadboard friendly development board using the SiFive FE310 RISC-V Microcontroller.

  • MCU – SiFive Freedom E310 (FE310) 32-bit RV32IMAC processor @ up to 320+ MHz (1.61 DMIPS/MHz)
  • Storage – 128-Mbit SPI flash (ISSI IS25LP128)
  • Expansion – 2x 14-pin headers with JTAG, GPIO, PWM, SPI, UART, 5V, 3.3V and GND
  • Misc – 1x reset button, 16 MHz crystal
  • Power Supply – 5V via pin 1 on header; Operating Voltage: 3.3 V and 1.8 V
  • Dimensions – 38 x 18 mm (estimated)
  • License – CERN Open Hardware Licence v1.2

LoFive – Tiny RISC-V Microcontroller Board – [Link]

Alzheimer’s Wearable Assistant

A smartwatch with fall and location detection, reminders and more, designed to help you or your loved one with Alzheimer’s!

When I saw Infineon’s Sensor Hub Nano, it appeared to be a good candidate in such a project, because of its very small size and BLE capabilities. With the accurate pressure sensing, it could be used to detect if the patient has fallen and also tell where exactly the patient is in the house.

Alzheimer’s Wearable Assistant – [Link]

ESP32 NTP OLED clock

@ blog.danman.eu build a OLED display NTP clock and document his process on his blog:

As a first project with my new ESP32 module with OLED display I chose to build OLED clock. I thought I’ll just find some existing code, upload it and it’s done. There are a few such projects for ESP8266 in NodeMCU. So I started with NodeMCU upload.

ESP32 NTP OLED clock – [Link]

4chord MIDI Plays All the Hits

4chord MIDI – the USB MIDI keyboard to play every major hit pop song with four little buttons. by Sven Gregori:

4chord MIDI – the USB MIDI keyboard dedicated to play all the four chord songs, from Adele via Green Day and Red Hot Chilli Peppers to U2 and Weezer. Thanks to MIDI, you can be any instrument – and all of them at once. Yay!

4chord MIDI Plays All the Hits – [Link]

1Bitsy ARM Cortex-M4F Dev Board

Open-Source Miniature Breadboard Friendly ARM Cortex-M4F Dev Board with 1MB Flash, 196kB RAM, 168MHz, floating point and more.

1Bitsy is a debuggable open source STM32F415 development board. Designed for beginners as well as advanced users that want more control over their embedded software by exposing the JTAG/SWD debug interface that is compatible with the Black Magic Probe JTAG/SWD debugger with built in GDB server.

1Bitsy ARM Cortex-M4F Dev Board – [Link]

ME Labs Advanced D-Stick (PIC18F47K40)

melabs.com released a new development board based on PIC18F47K40 PIC microcontroller. The board includes everything you need to start with your project. Documentation here: http://melabs.com/dstick/

The ME Labs Advanced D-Stick provides all the functionality of Microchip’s 40-pin PIC18F47K40 in a hardware module that includes a USB on-board programmer and virtual COM port. The D-Stick is a compact, simple and easy to use alternative to connecting a serial port, programmer, power supply, etc. to a solderless breadboard for project development. After development, simply replace the D-Stick with the pinout-compatible, production-ready PIC18F47K40.

ME Labs Advanced D-Stick (PIC18F47K40) – [Link]