Mcu category

Tinusaur, $3 ATtiny85 Microcontroller Board And Assembly Kit

Tinusaur is an Atmel ATtiny85 microcontroller board that comes in parts, as a kit, so you can solder it yourself and then program it. This small microcontroller board can run Arduino and its goal is to have a simple, cheap and quick-start platform for everyone interested in learning and creating things.

Tinusaur comes as an assembly kit, in parts, all in a small plastic bag, so you have to solder it yourself. In order to program this microcontroller board you will need a programmer like AVR ISP programmer, you can also use an Arduino to program the ATtiny microcontroller.

These are the components of Tinusaur standard kit:

  • PCB: Tinusaur PCB
  • MCU, Attiny85: Atmel AVR ATtiny85 microcontroller
  • Socket, DIP-8: DIP-8 socket for MCU
  • H1, Header: Header 2×4, Female
  • H2, Header: Header 2×5, Female
  • ISP, Header: Header 2×5, Male, for ISP
  • RESET, Button: Tactile push button, for RESET
  • Power, Header: Header 1×2, Male, for external power
  • Battery, Header: Header 1×2, Male, for battery power on/off
  • Battery, Jumper: Jumper, 2-pin, for battery power on/off
  • C1, Capacitor: Capacitor 100uF, Low profile 5×5 mm
  • C2, Capacitor: Capacitor 100nF, Small
  • R1, Resistor: Resistor 10K, Small, 1/8W
  • Battery holder: Battery holder for CR2032
  • Battery 3V: Battery 3V, CR2032

There is also the Tinusaur Starter – another kit that has everything included in the Tinusaur Board plus a USBasp programmer, plus few other useful things.

Tinusaur was launched 3 years ago and it is now used  in schools and universities to educate young people in both hardware and software. The team behind Tinusaur had launched an Indiegogo campaign to produce more of Tinusaur boards and bring the cost down to $3 per basic board and allow more people to be able to get them. A recent crowdfunding campaign was held by the team, it didn’t meet its goal plus it had the price multiplied by 3!

With just $3 you can get now the Lite edition of Tinusaur, the same components as the standard kit excluding the battery and its holder. You can get the Standard one for $4 and the Starter one for $6.

This Tinusaur is open source, both the hardware and the software, and you can check out the source files right here https://bitbucket.org/tinusaur. 3 days are left to end this crowdfunding campaign, so if you are interested in getting your own Tinusaur with that amazing price you should hurry up! More details can be found at the official product page, getting started page and tutorials.

Virtualette V1, A Tiny Powerful Microcomputer

Designed by SRKH Designs, Virtualette V1 is a small dual stack microcomputer that can run Android and Linux operating systems, for network-wide IoT and mobile edge computing solutions and electronics DIY projects.

Virtualette V1 is designed based on the dual-core Cortex-A7 Allwinner A20 SoC, with 1GB DDR3L base memory, 8GB onboard NAND flash, and a 32GB microSD card. It also includes a real time clock, onboard battery and wakeup function, and 80 IO pins.

The microcomputer is consist of dual connected PCBs with 7.6cm x 3.7cm x 1.8cm size including mounting feet. It has an Ethernet jack, a USB port to connect mouse or keyboard, microSD card slot, SATA port, and mini USB ports.

Virtualette V1 is a low energy device with a typical 2.4W of energy draw with three power options; 9-48V PoE (Powered over Ethernet), 5V USB OTG, and a lithium battery.

You can run any of linux-based operating system on the V1, in addition to the optimized linux distribution that will be shipped with it. Users can change the OS by swapping over the micro SD card and they have the option of booting from an external microSD card or from the onboard NAND 8GB flash.

Additional storage can be added by inserting a USB2 drive or external hard drive (SATA compatible). V1 can be optionally booted by USB or a dedicated SPI ROM port.

Virtualette V1 Playing DVD via SATA

Examples of V1’s potential capabilities are:

  • As an individual desktop device or controller for a drone or robot.
  • As a liquid-cooled computer inside a 40mm PVC pipe.
  • As M2M nodes in a distributed intelligent security system.
  • Deployed as a peer-to-peer, machine-to-machine network in applications such as display information systems in airports or train stations.

With the launch of their Kickstarter campaign, SRKH Designs aims to raise funding of US$22.5k, offering backers Virtualette V1 devices from the first production run as their reward.

Post campaign, a roadmap of hardware products for the Virtualette range is planned. This includes future quad-core and octa-core versions, an add-on FPGA-based development board, a desktop platform, popular video adaptor interfaces and an ‘All in One’ peripheral board designed to embed V1 inside a slimline display case.

Puck.js - A JavaScript powered button

Puck.js – The Ground-Breaking Bluetooth Low Energy Beacon

Puck.js is a low energy smart device which can be programmed and debugged wirelessly with JavaScript. It is both multi-functional and easy to use.  This beacon uses a custom circuit board with the latest Nordic chip, Bluetooth LE, Infrared transmitter, NFC, magnetometer, temperature sensor, RGB LEDs, and much more. Unlike other beacons, Puck.js comes with the open source JavaScript interpreter Espruino pre-installed, which makes it incredibly easy to use. Anyone without any prior programming experience can get started in seconds.

Puck.js Has a Very Small Form Factor
Puck.js Has a Very Small Form Factor

Specifications:

  • Espruino JavaScript interpreter pre-installed
  • nRF52832 SoC – Cortex M4, 64kB RAM, 512kB Flash
  • 8 × 0.1″ GPIO (capable of PWM, SPI, I2C, UART, Analog Input)
  • 9 × SMD GPIO (capable of PWM, SPI, I2C, UART)
  • Compatible with Bluetooth 5.0 – giving Quadruple the range, and double the speed of Bluetooth 4.2
  • Built-in Near Field Communications (NFC)
  • 12 bit ADC, timers, SPI, I2C, and Serial
  • MAG3110 Magnetometer
  • IR Transmitter
  • Red, Green and Blue LEDs
  • Pin capable of capacitive sensing
  • Built-in temperature sensor, light sensor, and battery level sensor
  • ABS plastic rear case and silicone cover with tactile button
  • CR2032 210mAh battery

Features:

Puck.js has various sensors for different purposes and various kinds of output components. It can measure light, temperature, magnetic fields, and capacitance. This beacon also can control Infrared remote devices, produce any color light using RGB LED, and has a tactile switch that turns the Puck into one big button.

The Magnetometer on Puck.js is a digital compass. You can measure its orientation about the earth’s magnetic field in 3 dimensions. It can also detect a magnet nearby and measures the magnetic field.

Detailed View of Puck.js Bluetooth Beacon
Detailed View of Puck.js Bluetooth Beacon

Puck also has the Web Bluetooth feature that enables controlling it from a web page wirelessly. The website simply sends the JavaScript code directly to the Puck, and it’ll be executed. Another excellent feature of Puck.js is internet accessibility. Espruino contains TCP/IP and HTTP client and servers (including WebSockets). With a suitable Bluetooth LE to the Internet Gateway, you’ll be able to put your Puck on the web!

The story doesn’t end here. Compared to other smart beacons, Puck.js has much more features that make it unbeatable. Open Source hardware and software is one of them. Go here to get a complete list of all features.

Conclusion:

Puck is an outstanding product. It has tons of booming features in a small package, yet easy to program. Anyone can get started with this amazing device within seconds. You can get it at £28 from this Kickstarter link. Also watch this video from Kickstarter campaign or the below video by Adafruit.com for a better understanding.

ATtiny Dev Board / Tinyduino

This is an ATtiny Dev Board. Designed for the ATtiny line of microcontollers from atmel. Its made to be small, simple to build and easy to use.

ATtiny Dev Board / Tinyduino – [Link]

Basics of most common communication protocols

circuitbasics.com has published a series of tutorials on the most popular communication protocols, like UART, I2C, SPI etc. Check them on the links below.

LED Based Strobe For Entertainment, Events & Warning Signals

Strobe provides regular flashes of light. Usually Strobes are designed using Xenon Tubes. Here is LED based simple solution that can be used as strobe for entertainment and events and also as warning signals. Project is based on PIC16F1825 micro-controller with two digit frequency display.

Project provides TTL output signal, frequency 1Hz-25Hz, Tact switches provided to set the frequency.

This project works along with DC Output Solid State Relay

Features

  • Supply 4.5 to 5V DC
  • Frequency 1Hz To 25Hz
  • Easy Interface with Relay Board
  • Easy Interface with Solid State Relay
  • On Board Power LED
  • On Board Output LED
  • Onboard Switch to set the frequency
  • 2X7 Segment 0.5 Inch Display

LED Based Strobe For Entertainment, Events & Warning Signals – [Link]

HIGH RESOLUTION AND ACCURACY CHRONOGRAPH

This is a project is for chronograph that was purposely build for a good friend of mine to be used for accurate measuring of high speed processes.

I am using two timers and the chronograph has three inputs, as depicted on the principal flow chart, which mean that Input1 trigger the start for timer1 and Input2 triggers the stop for timer1. In the same time Input2 will start timer2 and finally Input3 will stop timer2.
Based on the preselected distance and the detected time by the timer, the MCU will calculate and visualize the speed of the process and if you used three sensors then you can calculate the acceleration based on both speeds.

HIGH RESOLUTION AND ACCURACY CHRONOGRAPH – [Link]

Tiny CW Capacitive Touch Paddle

Edgar implemented capacitive touch sensing using an ATTiny4 to create a touch paddle for Morse code:

Like many no-code operators, after being on the air for a while, I developed an interest and appreciation for Morse Code [..] I purchased a cheap paddle, but I found the clicking noise a little bit annoying.

Tiny CW Capacitive Touch Paddle – [Link]

A Mass Programming Bench for ATMega32u4 MCUs

“limpkin” @ limpkin.fr wanted to program some thousand of MCUs so he decided to build his own programming bench. He writes:

As you may know I started the Mooltipass offline password keeper project more than 2 years ago. Together with a team of volunteers from all over the globe I created two Mooltipass devices which were successfully crowdfunded through Indiegogo and Kickstarter, raising a total of around $290k.
Through a secure mechanism it is possible to upgrade the firmware running on the Mooltipass units. On our latest device, the Mooltipass Mini, we implemented signed firmware updates, which involved storing inside the microcontrollers’ memory some cryptographic keys.

A Mass Programming Bench for ATMega32u4 MCUs – [Link]

Tibbo – New Tutorial List

Tibbo has a new list of tutorials on their website. Check them out:

  1. Quick jump to start NodeJS development on LTPS boards http://tibbo.com/linux/nodejs/before-you-begin.html
  2. LED Control From the Web Browser http://tibbo.com/linux/nodejs/led-control-from-browser.html
  3. Two-way Control with Web and Button http://tibbo.com/linux/nodejs/two-way-control-web-button.html
  4. Simple Card-based Access Control http://tibbo.com/linux/nodejs/simple-card-based-access-control.html
  5. GPIO: Displaying currency exchange rate on 7-segment indicators http://tibbo.com/linux/nodejs/gpio-seven-segment-indicators.html
  6. Tracking Environmental Data with TPS and Keen.IO http://tibbo.com/linux/nodejs/tracking-environmental-data.html
  7. Complex Build: Redis for LTPS http://tibbo.com/linux/native-c/building-redis.html