Tag Archives: Arduino

Hack Your Car With Macchina M2

Car hacking applications have been growing during the last few years, making it faster and cheaper to get into automotive tinkering. A new device was launched recently on kickstarter called M2 by Macchina.

M2 is an open-source, versatile development platform which can be wired under the hood for a more permanent installation or plugged into the OBD2 port, enabling you to do virtually anything with your vehicle’s software.

It is a tiny device (56.4mm x 40.6mm x 15.7mm) that is compact, modular, wirelessly connectable, and based on the popular Arduino Due. It consists of a processor board with a SAM3X8E Cortex-M3 MCU, a USB port, some LEDs, an SD card slot, and built-in EEPROM, as well as an interface board with two channels of CAN, two channels of LIN/K-LINE, a J1850 VPW/PWM, and even a single-wire (GMLAN) interface.

M2 is universal as its libraries and protocols are compatible with any car that isn’t older than Google. Macchina also aims to make the M2 compatible with as many existing open source software packages as possible.It is already compatible with SavvyCAN, CanCAT, MetaSploit, and CANtact.

Working with M2 is easy for Arduino users. Here is a summary of the steps needed to duplicate our shift light project on a CANbus-equipped manual transmission car that also illustrates the basic workflow when car hacking with M2:

  • Step 1: Download the latest Arduino IDE and install the Macchina boards add-on; test everything is working by blinking an LED.
  • Step 2: Download and install one of several open source “Sniffer” applications to your computer and upload the corresponding “sketch” to M2.
  • Step 3: Use the “Sniffer” application to identify the piece of data you are looking to use. In this case, engine RPM
  • Step 4: Write a “Sketch” to watch for RPM data and light up some LEDs proportionally and flash when it is time to shift.

You can also check this video to see an example of simple car hacking:

Macchina has partnered with Arduino, Digi and Digi-Key to develop M2, and it believes that its highly-adaptable hardware will most benefit hot rodders, mechanics, students, security researchers, and entrepreneurs by providing them access to the inner workings of their rides.

As it is an open source project, you can get its 3D files, schematics, BOM, and source files on the github repository. M2 will be available for $79 and it may cost about $110 if you build it yourself. Visit Macchina’s Kickstarter page to learn more or pre-order yours today. You can also check out Hackaday’s review about M2.

Macchina M2 tutorial introduction:

Installing The Micronucleus Bootloader To An ATtiny Via Arduino

In order to be able to upload Arduino sketches directly to the ATtiny84 over USB without the need to use a programming device, Shawn Hymel, an electrical engineer at Sparkfun Electronics, had published a guide showing how to install the micronucleus bootloader, which supports virtual USB (V-USB), onto an ATtiny84 using Arduino.

The Atmel AVR ATtiny84 is a $3 tiny 8-bit processor with 8K of program space, 12 I/O lines, and 8-channel 10 bit ADC. It will run up to 20MHz with an external crystal and can be programmed in circuit.

To start following the tutorial, you will need these parts:

Micronucleus is a bootloader designed for AVR ATtiny microcontrollers with a minimal usb interface, cross platform libusb-based program upload tool, and a strong emphasis on bootloader compactness. It has a built in V-USB so that you can send compiled firmware over a virtual USB connection.

The process will use an Arduino as a programmer by loading an Arduino ISP to install the micronucleus bootloader on the ATtiny84. The next step is allowing USB programming on ATtiny84 by manually change fuses, then creating a board definition for ATtiny84 and installing any necessary USB drivers.

The hardware components should be connected as shown in the above circuit. At first you have to remove the capacitor and connect a FTDI breakout to the Arduino Pro Mini and upload the Arduino ISP firmware.

Before installing Micronucleus, a 10μF capacitor is added between the RESET and GND pins of the Arduino. It will prevent the Arduino from entering bootloader mode so that it will pass the compiled firmware to the connected ATtiny rather than trying to program itself.

AVRDUDE is used then to change the ATtiny fuses and set them as the following:

  • No clock divider
  • Brown-out detection at 2.7V (not necessary, but useful if running off battery)
  • Self-programming

This tutorial should also work with ATtiny85, ATtiny841, and ATtiny167. You can find the detailed steps with a blink example on the main tutorial page.

Build Your Next IoT Device With GOBLIN 2

Designed for industry, makers, and visionary students, Verse Technology presents GOBLIN 2, its new card with the best of Arduino technology.

GOBLIN 2 is an IoT development board that unlocks the potential of the Internet of Things. It has been built based on the high-performance 16MHz ATmega328P microcontroller with a built-in SIM5320A connectivity module, and high accuracy 16-channel GPS.

The board contains 10 digital I/O ports half of them work as PWM, and 6 analog pins. It also integrates connectivity for each RS-485 protocol and voltage outputs of 24V, 5V and 3.3V that are ideal for industrial sensors or sensors with analog/digital signal.

The SIM5320A incorporates a dual-band HSDPA/WCDMA and Quad-Band GSM/GPRS/EDGE which gives GOBLIN 2 the connectivity with web servers through any cellular web. It also includes inlets/outlets to connect peripherals like keyboards, microphones, speakers, and thus exploit better the cellular network.

GOBLIN 2 Introduction video:

Technical specifications of GOBLIN 2:

  • Dimensions: 65.5mm x 82.2mm
  • Microcontroller: ATmega328P
  • CPU Speed: 16 MHz
  • Memory: 1KB EEPROM, 32KB Flash, 2KB SRAM
  • External Power Input: Micro USB 2.0 5V, Solar Panel 5V up to 200mA, 3.7V battery charger.
  • Power Output: 3.3V 300mA, 5V 3A, 24V 500mA.
  • Ports:
    • 6 ADC input – 10 bits resolution
    • 10 digital in/out – 5 PWM
    • 1 Micro USB Up to 115.2k baud
  • Connectivity:
    • SIM5320A with Header USB 2.0 interface
    • Header to Keypad, microphone and speaker for SIM I/O
    • High accuracy 16 channel GPS
    • RS-485 protocol 10Mbps Up to 256 nodes on the bus

GOBLIN 2 is powered by Li-Po battery of 3.7V to 4.2V, which can be charged through a solar cell or a Micro-USB thanks to its built-in battery management module. With an integrated voltage converter, GOBLIN can offer three output voltages; 24V to industrial sensors, 5v to charges like servomotors or related sensors with that kind of supply voltage and 3.3v for communication devices such a RF, Wi-Fi, sensors and others.

The board’s microcontroller can be programmed with Arduino IDE or Atmel Studio via micro USB, which also can be used for direct communication with the SIM5320A from the PC for a SIMCOM “AT+” command interchange.

Some of GOBLIN 2 applications:
  • Monitoring of industrial sensors with an RS-485 protocol.
  • Telemetry.
  • Vehicle monitoring.
  • GPS systems.
  • Weather monitoring.
  • Alarm system.
  • Automation applications.
  • SMS Applications, calls.
  • Monitoring of medic variables.
  • Remotes controls.

GOBLIN 2 is now available for $134 on Verse Technology store. Their github repository and documentation page contains some example codes and projects. This video shows the GOBLIN 2 in action:

Weather Station with a BME280 sensor and an LCD screen with Arduino Mega

In this Arduino Project video educ8s.tv is going to build a simple weather station using a BME280 sensor and an LCD shield.

Hello guys, I am Nick and welcome to educ8s.tv a channel that is all about DIY electronics projects with Arduino, Raspberry Pi, ESP8266 and other popular boards. Today we are going to take a first look at the new BME280 sensor, a new very interesting sensor. We are going to build a simple but very accurate weather station project. I have built a similar project 2 years ago, using different sensors. Now that we have a new sensor available which makes things easier, it’s time to update the project. As you can see, on the LCD display we can see the temperature, the humidity and the barometric pressure. The readings are updated every two seconds. This is a very easy project to build so it is ideal for beginners! Let’s build it!

Weather Station with a BME280 sensor and an LCD screen with Arduino Mega [Link]

DIY Arduino-Based Desktop CNC Router

Inspired by machines like the Nomad 883 from Carbide3D, Carvey from Inventables and more, Thimo Voorwinden had come up with a new tutorial for building a desktop CNC router powered by Arduino.

This CNC budget is around €200 and you don’t need a workshop to build it up, basic tools will do. It is designed to be modular, Arduino powered, and with a tolerance of (±0,1 mm). It has Ø8 mm linear rods, M8 thread lead screw and uses NEMA 17 stepper motors and drv8825 drivers. Plus, 250 watt flexible shaft is needed to drive the spindle and it has a work area of 200 x 250 x 100 mm (x,y,z).

Here you are the Bill of Materials that Thimo made based on his research in German and Chinese web-shops:

The tools Thimo used to build this CNC are listed here:

  • Homemade router table
  • Old ‘cordless’ drill
  • Ø22 mm wood spade drill
  • A rusty collection of old metal drill bits
  • Hammer
  • Metal saw
  • File
  • Screw drivers
  • Clamps
  • Try square
  • A soldering iron

Thimo shared this experience as a 5 HD video tutorials on Youtube to explain all the steps he went through: setting X and Y axis, the frame, Z axis and spindle, electronics and a video where the CNC is in action while milling a jigsaw piece. He added two extra videos for foam milling and testing the plotting function. Check them out here:

“For about €200 I’m now capable to CNC machine wooden parts. Not at a high speed, or without any bumps along the way, but having this option is still great. I will definitely try to machine some gears, specific parts for projects and engrave signs with this in the future.”

For more information, a detailed guide, and some notes check the project’s page at Thimo website.

Make Your Own Laser Scanning Microscope

A laser scanning microscope (LSM) is an optical imaging technique for increasing optical resolution and contrast of micrographs. It permits a wide range of qualitative and quantitative measurements on difficult samples, including topography mapping, extended depth of focus, and 3D visualization.

A laser microscope works by shining a beam of light on a subject in an X-Y plane. The intensity of the reflected light is then detected by a photoresistor (LDR) and recorded. When the various points of light are combined, you get an image.

Venkes had built his own DIY laser scanning microscope with a DVD pick-up, an Arduino Uno, a laser, and a LDR. He had also published an A-Z tutorial about making a similar device.

The result image consists of 256×256 pixels with resolution of 200 nm, about 1300 time enlargement, and it will not cost you a lot because you may have most of the parts. However, the scanning process is a bit slow, it may need half an hour for one image, and it is not crispy sharp.

The parts needed for this DIT LSM are:

  • 2 lens/coil parts of a laser pick-up (DVD and/or CD)
  • a bit of PCB
  • a piece if UTP cable (approx 15cm)
  • An Arduino UNO
  • An LDR
  • 2 x 10uF capacitors
  • 1 x 220 Ohm resistor
  • 1 x 10k resistor
  • 1 x 10k pot
  • 1 x 200 Ohm trim potentiometer
  • 1 breadboard
  • 1 switch
  • 1 3,5 mm jack plug
  • 1 audio amplifier
  • 1 laser with a good collimating lens
  • 1 piece of glass, a quarter of a microscope object glass or so to act as a semipermeable mirror
  • The under part of a ballpoint casing to put the LDR in

For the software side, an Arduino sketch is used to steer the lens, to read the LDR values, and to send information to a Processing sketch which will receive the data and translate it into an image.

You can find more details of this project with the source files at the project’s Instructables page. This video shows the device in action:

Tinusaur, $3 ATtiny85 Microcontroller Board And Assembly Kit

Tinusaur is an Atmel ATtiny85 microcontroller board that comes in parts, as a kit, so you can solder it yourself and then program it. This small microcontroller board can run Arduino and its goal is to have a simple, cheap and quick-start platform for everyone interested in learning and creating things.

Tinusaur comes as an assembly kit, in parts, all in a small plastic bag, so you have to solder it yourself. In order to program this microcontroller board you will need a programmer like AVR ISP programmer, you can also use an Arduino to program the ATtiny microcontroller.

These are the components of Tinusaur standard kit:

  • PCB: Tinusaur PCB
  • MCU, Attiny85: Atmel AVR ATtiny85 microcontroller
  • Socket, DIP-8: DIP-8 socket for MCU
  • H1, Header: Header 2×4, Female
  • H2, Header: Header 2×5, Female
  • ISP, Header: Header 2×5, Male, for ISP
  • RESET, Button: Tactile push button, for RESET
  • Power, Header: Header 1×2, Male, for external power
  • Battery, Header: Header 1×2, Male, for battery power on/off
  • Battery, Jumper: Jumper, 2-pin, for battery power on/off
  • C1, Capacitor: Capacitor 100uF, Low profile 5×5 mm
  • C2, Capacitor: Capacitor 100nF, Small
  • R1, Resistor: Resistor 10K, Small, 1/8W
  • Battery holder: Battery holder for CR2032
  • Battery 3V: Battery 3V, CR2032

There is also the Tinusaur Starter – another kit that has everything included in the Tinusaur Board plus a USBasp programmer, plus few other useful things.

Tinusaur was launched 3 years ago and it is now used  in schools and universities to educate young people in both hardware and software. The team behind Tinusaur had launched an Indiegogo campaign to produce more of Tinusaur boards and bring the cost down to $3 per basic board and allow more people to be able to get them. A recent crowdfunding campaign was held by the team, it didn’t meet its goal plus it had the price multiplied by 3!

With just $3 you can get now the Lite edition of Tinusaur, the same components as the standard kit excluding the battery and its holder. You can get the Standard one for $4 and the Starter one for $6.

This Tinusaur is open source, both the hardware and the software, and you can check out the source files right here https://bitbucket.org/tinusaur. 3 days are left to end this crowdfunding campaign, so if you are interested in getting your own Tinusaur with that amazing price you should hurry up! More details can be found at the official product page, getting started page and tutorials.

Tic Tac Toe Game with a touch screen and an Arduino Uno

In this Arduino project video educ8s.tv is going to build an Arduino Game, a Tic Tac Toe game with a touchscreen.

In this video we are going to build an Arduino Tic Tac Toe game. As you can see, we are using a touch screen and we are playing against the computer. A simple game like Tic Tac Toe is is a great introduction to game programming and Artificial Intelligence. Even though we won’t be using any Artificial Intelligence Algorithms in this game, we will understand why Artificial Intelligence Algorithms are required in more complex games.

Tic Tac Toe Game with a touch screen and an Arduino Uno [Link]

WeMOS D1 ESP8266 vs Arduino Uno, Arduino Due and Teensy 3.2. Which one is the fastest board?

In this video educ8s.tv is going to compare the computational speed of the WeMOS D1 ESP8266 based Arduino compatible board with the computational speed of the most popular Arduino boards and the Teensy 3.2.

A few weeks ago, in a similar video we compared the performance of the Teensy with the most popular Arduino boards. Today, we are going to add another board to the comparison, the WeMOS D1 ESP8266 Arduino compatible board. I have prepared a detailed tutorial on that board so you can check it out before we start.

WeMOS D1 ESP8266 vs Arduino Uno, Arduino Due and Teensy 3.2. Which one is the fastest board? – [Link]

OpenScope, An Open Source Multi-function Board

In order to make learning and using electronics accessible to all, Digilent Inc., an electrical engineering products company, had created a new powerful and affordable tool for  beginners and enthusiasts. ‘OpenScope’ is an instrumentation device that empowers makers, hobbyists, engineers, and new learners to design and debug their most innovative products.

OpenScope is a portable multi-function programmable instrumentation module, that connects with computer through WiFi or USB to allow acquiring, analysing, visualising, and controlling signals from circuits, sensors, and other electronic devices. It can also be programmed to work as a standalone development board, like Arduino and Raspberry Pi, with high-speed precision analog and digital I/O.

WaveForms Live is a free, open-source, JavaScript-based software that runs in a browser. It comes with OpenScope and is used for configuring it to work as an oscilloscope, a function generator, a logic analyzer, a power supply, or a data logger.

OpenScope can be used to make real time monitoring and troubleshooting projects, to build long-term capturing and calculating IoT devices, and also to gain a deeper understanding of electronics through visualizing what’s happening inside of the circuit.

The core of OpenScope is the Microchip PIC32MZ Processor, a 32-bit MCU based on the MIPS processor, clocked at 200MHz with 2 MB flash memory and up to 512KB high-speed SRAM. It is placed on OpenScope’s top face with a WiFi module, MicroUSB port for power and programming, programming headers, 30 pins, two input channels, gain select multiplexers, with led and buttons.

 

OpenScope Features:

  • 2 12-bit scope channels at 2 MHz bandwidth and 6.25 MS/sec sampling rate.
  • 1 MHz function generator output with 10 MS/sec update rate.
  • 10 programmable digital I/O pins .
  • Up to 50 mA ±4 volts programmable power supply.
  • On-Board WiFi
  • Reprogrammable through Arduino IDE and Microchip MPLabX

$14,000 has been reached since launching the Kickstarter campaign yesterday. You can reserve your own OpenScope for $80 and also an optional 3D printed case is available for $25. According to the project timeline, early shipping will begins in April 2017.