Tag Archives: Arduino

Using a Hall Effect Sensor with Arduino

Hall Effect Sensor

Hi guys, welcome to today’s tutorial. Today we will look at how to use a hall effect sensor with Arduino.

A hall effect sensor is a sensor that varies its output based on the presence or absence of a magnetic field. This means that the output signal produced by a Hall effect sensor is a function of magnetic field density around it. When the magnetic flux density around it exceeds a certain pre-set threshold value, the sensor detects it and generates an output voltage sometimes called the hall voltage to indicate the presence of the magnetic field.

Hall sensors are becoming very popular due to their versatility and they are used in many different applications. One of the popular applications of hall effect sensors is in automotive systems where they are used to detect position, measure distance and speed. They are also used in modern devices like smartphones and computers and also used in different type of switches where the presence of a magnetic field is used to either activate or deactivate a circuit.

Using a Hall Effect Sensor with Arduino – [Link]

PID temperature control with Arduino

PID temperature control with Arduino UNO.

If you want to keep something at a certain temperature, say a block of aluminum, you’ll need a thermocouple and some sort of heating element. While you could turn a heater on and off abruptly in a sequence appropriately known as “bang-bang,” a more refined method can be used called PID, or proportional-integral-derivative control. This takes into account how much the temperature is outside of a threshold, and also how it’s changing over time. [via]

PID temperature control with Arduino – [Link]

Color Detector Using TCS230 Color sensor and Arduino

TCS230 Color Sensor

Hi guys, welcome to today’s tutorial. In this tutorial we will look at how to use the TCS230 color sensor with Arduino. To demonstrate the ability of the color sensor, we will build a color detector system capable of detecting the color in front of the sensor and displaying that color on a TFT Display.  For this project, we will use the TCS230 color sensor and the color will be displayed on the ST7735 1.8″ TFT Display.

The TCS230 is a programmable color light-to-frequency converter which combines configurable silicon photodiodes and a current-to-frequency converter on a single monolithic CMOS integrated circuit.

The color sensor module is made up of the color sensor itself and four Infrared LEDs which are used to illuminate any object placed in front of the sensor to ensure the readings are accurate and are not affected by the surrounding illumination. The sensor is made up of an array of photodiodes with color filters for red, blue, green and a clear filter on top.

Color Detector Using TCS230 Color sensor and Arduino – [Link]

Renesas Develops RJ45 Ethernet Socket With Entire Ethernet Controller Embedded Into It

Renesas Electronics Corporation, a significant supplier of advanced semiconductor solutions, announced its latest industrial Ethernet module solution, the I-RJ45. It combines a single- or dual-port RJ45 connector and simplifies integration for industrial Ethernet by supporting various industrial network applications including sensors and transmitters, gateways, operator terminals and remote I/O.

Renesas RJ45 Ethernet Module
Renesas RJ45 Ethernet Module

This new device is an intelligent RJ45 module that comes with specialized embedded software that supports multiple industrial Ethernet protocol stacks. The software package and sample codes provide system manufacturers with a complete set of tools and frameworks to build their application. This helps to prototype systems, reducing the time needed for industrial network protocol integration. The modules are 50 x 17.5 x 12mm (single) and 50 x 35 x 12mm (dual).

With a general Application Programmable Interface (API), the application can easily be connected to the protocol software. It offers a seamless integration path to other Renesas ASSP solutions. The single-port version of the RJ45 module is based on the RX64M microcontroller (MCU) Group and the dual-port module solution includes the R-IN32M3 industrial Ethernet communication chip.

Renesas also offers a solution kit version of the module that consists of a single or dual-port industrial Ethernet module attached to an adapter board for development. This adapter board enhances the module to connect with Arduino and Pmod interfaces, which enables it to connect to other Renesas MCU development boards including Renesas Synergy™ and RX. The Ethernet module solution kit also includes a quick start-up guide, a USB cable and a CD with software and documentation.

Samples of the I-RJ45 industrial Ethernet module solution are now available worldwide. The mass production is scheduled to begin in Q3, 2018. The industrial Ethernet module solution kit may be available in April 2018 and projected price of €299.00 per kit.

More information is available at the product page of Renesas.

Introduction to DigiSpark – A Smaller, Cheaper and Powerful Arduino board

The Digispark board is one of the smallest Arduino boards ever produced and is copyrighted by Digistump LLC. Although it is tiny, it is also very powerful and powered by an ATTINY85 chip clocked up to 16.5Mhz (about the same speed as Arduino Uno boards). So Digispark is simply a microcontroller board based on an ATTINY85 MCU that can be programmed using the Arduino IDE. The Digispark is similar to the Arduino line mostly in regarding the programming way, it is cheaper, smaller, and quite powerful.

DigiSpark Development Board
DigiSpark Board

Just as most Arduino boards come with a USB port for programming and sometimes as source of power, Digispark comes with an onboard USB connector that can be plugged directly into a computer for programming of the device. The board can be powered via the USB port which will feed 5V to the board or from an external source via its VIN pin that can accept ~7 to 35V which will be regulated down to 5V through an onboard 78M05 voltage regulator.

Digispark is measured at 25mm by 18mm and comes with 6 GPIO pins for input and output. Three of those pins are capable of PWM and 4 of them capable of ADC. It also comes with 2 LED indicators, 1 for indicating power while the other is connected to either pin 0 or pin 1 depending on the type of board purchased. It comes with 8k Flash Memory and about 6k left after the addition of the bootloader, this is relatively small as compared to the 32K on the Arduino UNO but it’s fine for small to medium-sized projects.

DigiSpark PinOuts

One of the great advantages of using the Arduino boards and platform is the ability to use the inbuilt Serial to print out messages to the Arduino Serial monitor, a tool that is very handy for debugging. Unfortunately, the ATTINY85 which is found on the DigiSpark board cannot support the Serial library used in Arduino, but can technically support SoftwareSerial using some hack around. Anyway, engineers at Digispark devised another user interface option which aids as a serial monitor.

Getting Started With DigiSpark

The Digispark runs the “micronucleus tiny85” bootloader version 1.02, an open source project. Of course, you don’t need to worry about burning the bootloader since the Digispark already comes with the bootloader pre-installed, but you will have to burn the bootloader yourself if you want to build your own Attiny85 digispark clone.

Furthermore, DigiSpark uses USB to communicate with the computer, so you should install the DigiSpark USB driver. To do this, you must download Arduino for Digispark which come with USB driver and extract the file (DigisparkArduino-Win32-1.0.4-March29.zip) to any folder, then execute DigisparkArduino– Win32\DigisparkWindowsDriver\InstallDriver.exe to start installing the USB driver.

Digispark is highly recommended to be used with the Arduino IDE 1.6.5+ and the Arduino 1.6.6 or 1.6.7 are not recommended. Make sure you have the Arduino IDE already installed. If you don’t have it already you can download it from the Arduino Website.

To start programming and working with Digispark, watch the full video below. If you are stuck or need some help, you can visit the tutorial page from Digispark here.

Digispark is a great way to jump into electronics, or perfect for when an Arduino is too big or too much. DigiSpark is available for purchase on the DigiStump website at a price of $7.95 and currently sold out and restocking will begin from May 2018. If you are like me that don’t like waiting that long, you can get a DigiSpark board for a relatively lesser price than the $7.95 from Aliexpress at about $1.7 or can be purchased on eBay as well.

4 Channel Relay Shield for Arduino UNO

4 Channel Relay Shield for Arduino UNO is a simple and convenient way to interface 4 relays for switching applications in your project. Very compact design that can fit on top of Arduino UNO. Project requires 12V DC supply, all 4 trigger inputs require TTL signal, Relay-1 to Relay-4 inputs connected to D8 To D11 of Arduino digital pins through solder jumpers J1 To J4. All trigger inputs can be connected to other I/O pins of Arduino using female header connectors and you will need to open solder jumpers J1-J4 in this case.  D1, D2, D3, D4 LEDs provided to indicate the Relay ON/OFF status. D5 is Power LED. Each relay has 3 pin screw terminals with normally open/normally closed switch to connect the load. Project is ideally used for low voltage applications and requires extra care in case of using high voltage AC switching.

Features

  • Input supply 12 VDC @ 170 mA ( Arduino DC Jack)
  • Output four SPDT relay
  • Relay specification 7A/24V DC-230V AC
  • Trigger level 2 ~ 5 VDC
  • Header Connector for connecting power and trigger voltage
  • Solder Jumpers J1, J2, J3, J4 Interface Arduino Pins D8, D9, D10, D11
  • LED on each channel indicates relay status
  • Power Battery Terminal (PBT) for easy relay output
  • PCB Dimensions 68.37MM x 51.91 MM

4 Channel Relay Shield for Arduino UNO – [Link]

MP3 player using Arduino and DFPlayer mini

Hi guys, welcome to this tutorial. Today, we will build an mp3 player using an Arduino and the DFPlayer mini MP3 module.

The DFplayer mini is a small, low-cost mp3 module with a simplified audio output that can be connected directly to a speaker or an earphone jack. The module can be used as a stand-alone module with attached battery, speaker, and push buttons or used in combination with a microcontroller or development board like the Arduino, enabled for RX/TX (Serial) communication, thus through simple serial commands we can play music and perform other functions like playing the next and previous song, shuffle, pause the song currently being played etc. The module comes with an SDcard slot and supports both FAT16, FAT32 file system.

MP3 player using Arduino and DFPlayer mini – [Link]

$6 Maker UNO: Simplifying Arduino for Education

Simplified Arduino board targets Education. The project is live at kickstarter and has 22 days to go.

Students can skip the hassle of constructing the basic electronic circuit which is boring and time consuming. Although it is equally important for them to learn about basic electronics, it can always come later after they have experienced how easy it is to create awesome project. Start with fun and excitement. Start coding right away and see your board lights up and plays melody with the press of a button.

With the conventional Arduino boards, students also face another common problem – difficulty in troubleshooting their circuit. This is because when it doesn’t work, we do not know whether the problem is due to wire connection or coding.

$6 Maker UNO: Simplifying Arduino for Education – [Link]

Using the ST7735 1.8″ Color TFT Display with Arduino

1.8″ Colored TFT Display

Hi guys, welcome to today’s tutorial. Today, we will look on how to use the 1.8″ ST7735  colored TFT display with Arduino. The past few tutorials have been focused on how to use the Nokia 5110 LCD display extensively but there will be a time when we will need to use a colored display or something bigger with additional features, that’s where the 1.8″ ST7735 TFT display comes in.

The ST7735 TFT display is a 1.8″ display with a resolution of 128×160 pixels and can display a wide range of colors ( full 18-bit color, 262,144 shades!). The display uses the SPI protocol for communication and has its own pixel-addressable frame buffer which means it can be used with all kinds of microcontroller and you only need 4 i/o pins. To complement the display, it also comes with an SD card slot on which colored bitmaps can be loaded and easily displayed on the screen.

Using the ST7735 1.8″ Color TFT Display with Arduino – [Link]

Program Pi, BeagleBone and Other Linux SBCs On The Arduino Create Platform

We have seen the massive ecosystem the Arduino has built and established over the last few years and this has made developing with Arduino quite leisurely. It is way easier to solve a programming issue or hardware issue with Arduino unlike other hardware boards mostly due to its community.  Arduino Create is an online platform by the Arduino Team that simplifies building a project as a whole, without having to switch between many different tools to manage the aspects of whatever you are making.

Arduino Create

Arduino Create is excellent especially for people already used to build stuff with Arduino boards, but what about the likes of Raspberry Pi, BeagleBones, and other makers board? The Arduino boards are great, especially the famous Arduino Uno, but this board still have it’s limitations too. The Raspberry Pi/BeagleBone on the other hand could take some task that the 16MHz Arduino Uno will never dream of doing, but this will also require makers and developers to begin learning new hardware (could be daunting for beginners). But this is changing now, as Massimo Banzi, CTO, and Arduino co-founder announced an expansion of Arduino Create to support Arm boards which will provide optimized support for the Raspberry Pi and BeagleBone boards.

Arduino Create now integrates Raspberry Pi, Beaglebone and other Linux based SBCs ─ all with IoT in mind. The introduction of ARM boards (Raspberry Pi, BeagleBone, AAEON® UP² board, and Custom ARM boards) follows the vision of the Arduino’s goal for the Create platform. A vision to build a full featured IoT development platform for developing IoT (Internet of Things) devices quicker, faster, and easier than ever before, intended for Makers, Engineers or Professional Developers. Arduino Creates brings the Arduino framework and libraries to all these SBCs, officially, changing the development game in a big way.

“With this release, Arduino extends its reach into edge computing, enabling anybody with Arduino programming experience to manage and develop complex multi-architecture IoT applications on gateways,” stated Massimo Banzi in a press release. “This is an important step forward in democratizing access to the professional Internet of Things.”

Raspberry Pi and other Linux based ARM boards can now leverage the community surrounding the Arduino Create Platform that offers support for step-by-step guides, examples, code, schematics and even projects. Although the SBC support is brand new, resources surrounding SBCs is sure to grow, in short time. Import from or sharing with the community is easy too.

Multiple Arduino programs can run simultaneously on a Linux-based board and interact and communicate with each other, leveraging the capabilities provided by the new Arduino Connector. Moreover, IoT devices can be managed and updated remotely, independently from where they are located.

Getting started with Arduino Create for the Linux SBCs is quite easy and straightforward. One merely connect the Raspberry Pi, or whatever SBC of choice to a computer and connect it to the cloud via Arduino Connect or via USB using the Arduino Plugin (This will make possible the communication between the USB ports on your PC and your Arm®-based Platform.). To start developing, upload sketches (programs) from the browser to the SBC. No need to install anything to get the code to compile, everything is up-to-date. This may become a standard way to develop on these platforms.

Arduino Create currently works with any board that runs Debian OS; a case for the Raspberry Rasbian, which is a Debian OS. To get started building with the Arduino Create for your ARM-based boards, visit the Arduino Create site, and click on the Getting Started while setting the board of your choice.