Tag Archives: Arduino

Burning the Bootloader on ATMega328 using USBasp Programmer

ATmega328 Arduino bootloader

by openelectronicsproject.blogspot.com:

In this tutorial you’ll learn how to burn arduino bootloader on new ATmega328 using USBasp ISP programmer.Please be noted that every Arduino Board comes with a microcontroller ATmega328 pre-program with arduino bootloader firmware. Therefore, there is no need to burn the bootloader firmware again.But if you want to make your own DIY arduino board than you need to burn arduino bootloader into ATmega328. So here i’ll show you how to load arduino bootloader into atmega328 step by step.

Burning the Bootloader on ATMega328 using USBasp Programmer – [Link]

DIY USB Line Power Meter Stick

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a new project is published on electro-labs.com, check it out:

Another DIY project designed with FabStream’s SoloPCB tool is ready to be shared with Electro-Labs community. This is an USB stick which measures the supply voltage of the USB port and current drawn by the device connected to the port over the stick. Then it calculates the power consumption of the device and displays the whole information with the help of the small OLED display on the board. The stick itself is also powered from the USB port.

The board is built around an Atmel ATMEGA328 microcontroller. To make the circuit as small as possible, the MCU is used in minimal configuration. Internal 8MHz oscillator is used. The voltage and the current are measured by the internal 10 bit ADC. To make the measurements more accurate, an external 2.5V voltage reference IC, Microchip MCP1525 is included. The current is converted to voltage on a 0.01R sense resistor and precisely amplified by LT6106 before read. The stick can measure up to 2.5A. Since the OLED display requires 3.3V supply voltage, L78L33ACUTR linear voltage regulator is used.

DIY USB Line Power Meter Stick – [Link]

iHome – Intelligent Thermostat Project

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by jwozniak @ jwdevs.com :

The world of IoT for “Smart Home” is growing very fast. There are various areas of interests from security to automated animal care depicted for instance on this page.

I’ve tried to look at the things from the practical point of view. What would be interesting enough to be build as a project and at the same time have a real, quantitive value? It happens that I was always interested in limiting the energy consumption at home. One evening when talking to my wife and trying to get her opinion on my adventures into electronics she said that it would be great to have a heating already on before she gets home (and a cosy, warm place ready exactly when she enters). I guess she said it as a kind of a joke. To her surprise I got attracted by the idea. Hey, why not? With the current state of technology it is actually feasible. Maybe a bit challenging at first sight but still. So this is how it has started. Let’s build a intelligent thermostat that would be off when we are not at home and turning on when we come back! Great! Let’s see, maybe it will even improve the energy consumption…

iHome – Intelligent Thermostat Project – [Link]

How to control LM2596 buck-converter with microcontroller

by hugatry @ hackvlog.com:

Every now and then someone asks on different forums if there is an way to control cheap LM2596 modules with an Arduino or another microcontroller. I decided to demonstrate one solution that might be basic electronics for some, but still many don’t know about.

Those buck converters will change the output voltage to make the feedback pin, connected to the output via a voltage divider, become 1.25V or so. If feedback is higher, output gets lower and vice versa. If one changes the ratio of resistors in voltage divider, output voltage will change. This is usually done by turning a trimmer resistor with a screwdriver. That is good enough for many applications where voltage will be set only once, but sometimes there is a need to adjust the output voltage more frequently.

How to control LM2596 buck-converter with microcontroller – [Link]

DIY Digital Compass

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by DaAwesomeP @ instructables.com:

I’m astounded that some cars don’t have a digital compass always visible. You either have to launch the navigation app each time which may even disappear when you adjust the radio. In this project, you’ll create a digital compass that can be powered by by the cigarette lighter or another source (batteries make it handheld). You could buy one, but where’s the fun in that?

DIY Digital Compass – [Link]

Arduino playing the melody with the Sd card

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by sezgingul @ instructables.com:

This project is in SD card loaded stolen melody is provided by command sent from the serial monitor.
If you want to add the application var.siz 6-melody melody melody file must be the same as the name of the specified code name.

The components are used:

Arduino UNO, SD card reader, speakerphone

Arduino playing the melody with the Sd card – [Link]

Arduino Radar Tutorial: Fading an LED With My Breath

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by build-electronic-circuits.com:

I built this Arduino radar project, where I control the brightness of an LED with my breath. In this tutorial, I will show you exactly how to do it.

It was an experiment to get the XeThru radar to work with Arduino. I plan to expand on this later, and build more useful applications.

And I will share with you how to connect the hardware, and how to create the Arduino code.

Arduino Radar Tutorial: Fading an LED With My Breath – [Link]

Arduino dust sensor

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Shadowandy’s Arduino-based Dust Sensor project:

Put together a dust sensor using Arduino Mega 2560, Shinyei PPD42NS dust sensor and LCD shield.

The codes and wiring instructions for Arduino Mega 2560 and Shinyei PPD42NS is as follow. However, I did include Serial output so you can view the sampling results using Arduino IDE’s Serial Monitor (9600 bauds).

Arduino dust sensor – [Link]

Arduino-based “Analog” slow cooker controller

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Dan Ternes blogged about his Arduino-based controller for analog slow cookers:

With the AC power control figured out, I considered the User Interface. I opted for something simple. The Adafruit RGB LCD Shield would work well as it had both a display and buttons built in. Sure, I could have beat this project about the head and neck with “IoT”-this and “ESP8266″-that, but I was feeling lazy and just wanted a simple timer control. Of course, there’s nothing that says I won’t add some kind of wireless connectivity, but for now, local control is fine.

Arduino-based “Analog” slow cooker controller – [Link]