Tag Archives: Arduino

Arduino Easy Module Shield Tutorial – Is this the best Arduino Shield

Our friends on educ8s.tv uploaded a new Arduino tutorial. Let’s check it out.

Dear friends welcome to another Arduino Tutorial! Today we are going to take a first look at this very promising new shield for Arduino, the Arduino Easy Module Shield! Also we are going to build a couple of projects with it. Let’s get started!

Arduino Easy Module Shield Tutorial – Is this the best Arduino Shield – [Link]

LoRa IOT Home Environment Monitoring System

RodNewHampshire @ instructables.com writes:

The LoRa IOT Home Environmental Monitoring System consists of an Arduino Mega based IOT-to-Internet gateway and Arduino Feather based remote stations with environmental sensors. The remote stations communicate wirelessly with the gateway using LoRa radios.

LoRa IOT Home Environment Monitoring System – [Link]

Arduino Primo With Bluetooth, NFC, Wi-Fi, and Infrared

Thanks to a partnership with Nordic Semiconductor – the world’s most successful open-source ecosystem for education, Maker, and Internet of Things (IoT) markets -, Arduino announced its new board, Arduino Primo, including native Bluetooth Low Energy wireless connectivity and NFC touch-to-pair using Nordic nRF52832 SoCs.

The Arduino Primo combines the processing power from the Nordic nRF52 processor, an Espressif ESP8266 for WiFi, as well as several on-board sensors and a battery charger.  The nRF52 includes NFC (Near Field Communication) and Bluetooth Smart.  The sensors include an on-board button, LED and infrared receiver and transmitter.

There are three onboard microcontrollers:

  • nRF52832, the main Arduino microcontroller with integrated BLE and NFC
  • STM32f103, a service microcontroller used for advanced debugging and programming of the other microcontrollers
  • ESP8266, for Wi-Fi and related internet connectivity functions.

The board has:

  • 14 digital input/output pins (of which 12 can be used as PWM outputs)
  • 6 analog inputs
  • 64 MHz ceramic resonator
  • micro-USB connector
  • ICSP header
  • battery charger
  • Infrared receiver and transmitter
  • NFC antenna
  • BLE interface
  • Buzzer
  • two service buttons
  • LEDs
  • reset buttons (to reset the various microcontrollers).

Arduino Primo can be connected to a computer using a micro-USB cable, or it can be powered using a battery, connected via a 2-pin JST-PH connector. Having both Bluetooth and Wi-Fi connectivity on board makes it easy to get started in the IoT world.

“Our passion at Arduino is to provide the tools to encourage passionate people to build out their ideas and bring them into the world. Adding wireless connectivity from our partnership with Nordic provides even more options,” says Federico Musto, CEO & President of Arduino S.r.L. “Ease-of-use is one of our core strengths, and this makes the Nordic chip a perfect match for the Arduino Primo,” adds Musto.

More details about Arduino are available at the official page at Arduino.org

Paperino, The ePaper Display Shield

ePaper displays  (EPDs) are becoming a trend in application, just like the display used in Amazon Kindle,  for their low power consumption due to the  to the underlying ‘bistable’ display technology. These displays can continue to show information without any power at all. It is only required while updating the display with new information, otherwise there won’t be any power consumption.

Providing such revolutionary displays to your applications will be a professional approach. For this, a new crowdfunding campaign is providing Paperino, an easy-to-use, micro ePaper shield for the Particle & Arduino community. Paperino simplifies driving ePaper displays with clean, simple, and short script examples.

Thanks to the plug-and-play shield for particle family, Paperino can be used with the following boards: Photon, Electron, or Bluz without manual wiring. It can also be wired easily to be connected with Arduino and other compatible boards.

Paperino Features

Glass-free Display

Paperino is lightweight and thinner than other ePaper products because it uses a glass-free ePaper display from Plastic Logic. It weighs 1.2 grams and is only 0.5 mm thick.

Supports Four Gray Levels

Unlike many other ePaper products out there, Paperino can support four gray levels instead of two (black and white).

Fast, Partial Updates

You don’t have to wait for slow, full screen updates to load. With Paperino, you can quickly update only parts of the screen.

Accelerometer

The integrated accelerometer lets you interact with your Paperino in all sorts of ways, including tap sensing. Tap sensing capability can trigger screen updates or wake up your microcontroller.

Paperino Specifications

The Paperino breakout board can be used for manually wiring your favourite, Arduino-compatible microcontroller with 3.3 V and >4kb of free RAM.

  • Resolution: 148 x 70 px
  • Pixel density: 150 ppi
  • Grey levels: 4
  • Weight: 1.2 g
  • Thickness: 500 µm
  • Power consumption: 4.5 mA (mean current for typical image update)
  • Operating conditions: 0°C .. 40°C
  • Storage conditions: -25°C .. 50°C

You can pre-order your own Paperino for $20 and with a driver board for $30. The crowdfunding campaign still has 16 days to go, and you can learn more details by checking it out.

20×4 I2C Character LCD display with Arduino Uno

Our friends on educ8s.tv published a new video! Check it out.

Hello guys, I am Nick and welcome to educ8s.tv a channel that is all about DIY electronics projects with Arduino, Raspberry Pi, ESP8266 and other popular boards. Subscribe to the channel now if you don’t want to miss any future videos. In this video we are going learn how to use this inexpensive character LCD display with Arduino. After we learn how to use the display we are going to build something useful. A simple real time clock. Let’s start.

20×4 I2C Character LCD display with Arduino Uno [Link]

Explore magnetoresistive sensing with Arduino

Graham Prophet@ eedesignnewseurope.com discuss about precision-measurement motion sensing using Arduino compatible kit.

From distributor RS Components, this kit enables development of precision-measurement motion control systems using Sensitec’s magnetoresistive sensor technology, applied to linear and angular measurement.

Explore magnetoresistive sensing with Arduino – [Link]

Master Your Arduino Skills With Arduino Playground Book

Are you an experienced maker who are looking for more advanced Arduino skills to get?

Warren Andrews, an experienced engineer and journalist, wrote a new book that walks makers through building 10 outside-the-box projects, helping them advance their engineering and electronics know-how. With this book, makers will delve more deeply into hardware design, electronics, and programming.

The “Arduino Playground: Geeky Projects for the Curious Maker” book is published by the Geek book publisher, No Starch Press. Projects inside the book provide a way to build new things that vary between practical and fun.

Content of the book

The book has 11 chapters, the first one is a warm up, it contains a quick guide to get the Arduino ready, prepare the IDE and try some sketches, making DIY PCBs, and using SOICs. Each chapter of the other 10 chapters is a project chapter that starts with listing the required tools, components, and software, followed by detailed instructions of the build containing all sketches and board templates. There are also author’s design notes, which are sure to provide inspiration for your own inventions.

  • Chapter 0: Setting Up and Useful Skills
  • Chapter 1: The Reaction-Time Machine
    A reaction-time game that leverages the Arduino’s real-time capabilities
  • Chapter 2: An Automated Agitator for PCB Etching
    A tool for etching your own printed circuit boards
  • Chapter 3: The Regulated Power Supply
    A regulated, variable-voltage power supply
  • Chapter 4: A Watch Winder
    A kinetic wristwatch winder decked out with LEDs
  • Chapter 5: The Garage Sentry Parking Assistant
    A garage parking assistant that blinks when your vehicle is perfectly parked
  • Chapter 6: The Battery Saver
    A battery saver that prevents accidental discharge
  • Chapter 7: A Custom pH Meter
  • A practical and colorful pH meter
  • Chapter 8: Two Ballistic Chronographs
    A ballistic chronograph that can measure the muzzle velocity of BB, Airsoft, and pellet guns
  • Chapter 9: The Square-Wave Generator
    A square-wave generator
  • Chapter 10: The Chromatic Thermometer
    A thermometer that tells the temperature using a sequence of colored LEDs

Reviews

“Arduino Playground is not for the faint of heart. Unless the faint of heart person plans to build a pacemaker with Arduino!” —ScienceBlogs

“This is a book designed for Arduino enthusiasts who’ve mastered the basics, conquered the soldering iron, and programmed a robot or two. Warren Andrews shows you how to keep your hardware hands busy.” —I Programmer

The book is available for $30 on No Starch Press and Amazon. You can view the detailed table of contents and the index, and also you can download Chapter 4: A Watch Winder, and the sketches, templates, and PCB files used in this book.

MightyWatt: 70W Electronic Load for Arduino

Jakub designed and built a programmable electronic load for Arduino, the MightyWatt R3:

MightyWatt R3 is a programmable electronic load. That means you can use it for testing batteries, power supplies, fuel cells, solar cells and other sources of electrical power. You can also make a programmable power supply from a fixed-voltage power supply and MightyWatt R3 and use it for example as an intelligent battery charger.

MightyWatt: 70W Electronic Load for Arduino – [Link]

Using I2C SSD1306 OLED Display With Arduino

Sometimes it may be necessary to use a display when making a hardware project, but one confusing thing is the size of the display and the required pins to control it. This tutorial will show you how to use a small I2C OLED display with Arduino using only two wires.

The display used in this tutorial has a very small (2.7 x 2.8cm) OLED screen, that is similar to Arduino Pro Mini size, with 128 x 64 screen resolution. The OLED Driver IC is SSD1306, a single-chip CMOS OLED/PLED driver with controller for organic / polymer light emitting diode dot-matrix graphic display system. The module has only 4 pins, two of them are the supply pins, while the others are SCL and SDA, I2C protocol pins, which will be used to control the display.

Using I2C SSD1306 OLED Display With Arduino – [Link]

Arduino RFID Keycard Access

Use the PN532 NFC available on the anduinoWiFi shield to create an RFID keycard building access system. by Brian Carbonette @ hackster.io

Arduino RFID Keycard Access – [Link]