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22 Dec 2014

FRSUU6DI3THEUNX.MEDIUM

by physicsenthusiast:

In this tutorial, you will learn how to build a device that lets you feel radiation in your vicinity on your fingertips, and, if tuned well, feel cosmic rays passing through your hands. You will build it starting only with Geiger Muller tubes, fairly standard electronics components, and RFDuinos. The basic steps are to create a high voltage supply in which to suspend your tubes, process pulses from your tubes and feed them into an RFduino, and then use RFduino’s GZL library to radio events to a glove with vibrating motors attached to the fingertips. (RFDuino also makes it very easy to read data into an iPhone app, if you feel like going further).

Networked Cosmic Ray Detector: Feel Radiation on your Fingertips - [Link]

17 Dec 2014

mg_1131-600

Lukas of Soldernerd built a DIY Arduino-based inductance meter:

I’ve just finished a little Arduino project. It’s a shield for the Arduino Uno that lets you measure inductance. This is a functionality that I found missing in just about any digital multi meter. Yes, there are specialized LCR meters that let you measure inductance but they typically won’t measure voltages or currents. So I had to build my inductance meter myself.

[via]

Arduino-based inductance meter - [Link]

11 Dec 2014

F9LPZFTI3GX8NDS.MEDIUM

by jazzycamel:

I work as a software developer for a biology lab where my day job consists of creating applications to deal with big data visualisation. Recently however one of my colleagues had the need to take regular temperature measurements form a range of jars of liquids over quite an extended period. The commercial available solutions to achieve this are expensive and surprisingly lacking in features. So, as a dedicated hacker and maker, I immediately stepped in an said we could make something better ourselves. So we did. And this is how.

Quick & Easy Temperature Loggers - [Link]

11 Dec 2014

ScanaLogicEduTitle1

here is a new review of embedded-lab.com about a simple logic analyzer.

A logic analyzer is an excellent tool for capturing many digital signals at once and displaying their timing relationships. It is particularly useful in verifying and debugging digital circuits. This tutorial is intended to provide a quick overview of a logic analyzer tool and its uses in analyzing and decoding data flowing on multiple signal lines or bus in a digital system. The logic analyzer tool is extremely helpful in troubleshooting problems arising from timing violations and transients on buses. In this article, I am going to use the SCANALOGIC-2 educational kit from IKALOGIC to illustrate very basic features of a logic analyzer.

A basic Logic Analyzer – SCANALOGIC-2 EDU KIT - [Link]


9 Dec 2014

zener

by Vladimir Oleynik @ edn.com:

To measure a zener diode’s breakdown voltage, you need a dc voltage source whose voltage exceeds that of the zener voltage. In Figure 1, resistor RSER provides voltage drop between VIN and VZEN. In any case, VIN should exceed VZEN. Resistor RSER must provide current, IZEN, that can keep the zener diode in reverse breakdown. That is, the current must be more than IZEN-IZENMIN and less than IZEN-IZENMAX. You also need to consider the current that flows through the load. Otherwise, VZEN will be unregulated and less than the nominal breakdown voltage. Also, the power that the zener diode dissipates should not exceed the manufacturer’s specifications. Except for the value of IZEN-IZENMIN, all necessary data appears in zener-diode data sheets.

Circuit lets you measure zener voltages and test LEDs - [Link]

2 Dec 2014

LCM3(2)_th

by Hristo:

After finishing my last project – “Simple LC meter“, there were some discussions in the forum I am a member of, that ability to measure electrolytic capacitors would be very useful in this type of device.

I searched the Web and found a very cute project named LCM3 on this Hungarian site: hobbielektronika.hu . I love Hungarian rock since my school days, but I don’t know a word in Hungarian :( . So, I searched the Web again, this time for this specific project and found a Russian forum where the project was discussed in details and I got more useful information about parts, settings and so on.

Advanced LC meter - [Link]

2 Dec 2014

RSA306 Fig1

by Kenneth Wyatt @ edn.com:

The spectrum analyzer has always been a vital tool for the EMC engineer. Until the last few years, these instruments have been rather large and heavy desktop instruments, weighing up to 60 pounds, or more. With the breakthroughs in components used for wireless technology, the size and weight of these instruments has decreased dramatically. This is good news for product designers whose workbenches may already be cluttered with other test instruments or for those like myself who work a lot in the field or travel a lot.

Tektronix RSA306 spectrum analyzer Review - [Link]

28 Nov 2014

LCmeter_7_th

Here is another piece of laboratory equipment – LC meter. This type of meter, especially L meter is hard to find in cheap commercial multimeters.

Schematic of this one came from this web page: https://sites.google.com/site/vk3bhr/home/index2-html

It uses PIC microcontroller 16F628A, and because I recently acquired a PIC programmer, I decided to test it with this project. Following the above link you will find the original schematic, PCB, source and HEX files for programing the microcontroller and detailed description.

Simple PIC LC meter - [Link]

22 Nov 2014

In this tutorial Dave describes what AC trigger coupling is on an oscilloscope and why it can be useful. Not only on old analog CRT oscilloscopes, but modern digital scopes as well.
How and why is it different to AC channel input coupling?
Also, use of the 50% trigger control, and how the venerable DS1052E is still more usable than the new DS1054Z.

EEVblog #685 – What Is Oscilloscope AC Trigger Coupling? - [Link]

15 Nov 2014

by EEVblog @ youtube.com

Dave investigates two very serious issues with jitter on the Rigol DS1000Z series oscilloscopes, including the DS1104Z and new DS1054Z
Some sort of modulated sampling/trigger jitter problem at 5 microsecond intervals (the “5us jitter problem”). And severe jitter with the AC coupled trigger mode, a problem which is also present on the DS2000 series scopes as well.

EEVblog #683 – Rigol DS1000Z & DS2000 Oscilloscope Jitter Problems - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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