Home Blog  





13 Feb 2015

TPS62360

By Chris Glaser @ ti.com:

Especially for switch-mode power supplies (SMPSs), the printed circuit board (PCB) layout is a critical but often under appreciated step in achieving proper performance and reliability. Errors in the PCB layout cause a variety of misbehaviors including poor output voltage regulation, switching jitter, and even device failure. Issues like these should be avoided at all costs, since fixing them usually requires a PCB design modification. However, these pitfalls are easily circumvented if time and thought are spent during the PCB layout process before the first PCBs are ever ordered. This article presents five simple steps to ensure that your next step-down converter’s PCB layout is robust and ready for prototyping.

Five steps to a great PCB layout for a step-down converter - [Link]

15 Jan 2015

edison_breakout

by Stephen Edward:

A Simple Breakout board for the edison. Does nothing special except breaks out the 70pin connector to 2.54mm Pins so you can start experimenting with the Edison.

Has an experimenters area so you can solder on things like a regulator or Level shifter.

It also has the bottom side through connectors so that you can daisy change multiple boards or other Edison shields

Custom DIY Intel Edison Breakout Board - [Link]

22 Dec 2014

ESP82663

Raj from Embedded Lab has designed this breadboard friendly adapter for rapid prototyping with the ESP8266 serial-to-wifi module. It receives a ESP-01 model ESP8266 transceiver through a 2×4 female header and provides easy access to those pins through two single row headers that are breadboard friendly.

ESP8266 adapter for easy breadboarding - [Link]

8 Dec 2014

f5

Andrew Sarangan @ edn.com:

Why make your own printed circuit boards when you can get them commercially made for low cost? For one, it can take one to four weeks to receive the boards. For prototyping, this can be a major hurdle. Each design iteration will then take a month or more, and a project may need many months to get done. The DIYer can fab the board and assemble everything in one evening. That advantage is really hard to beat.

Besides time, there are other reasons to make your own board. Commercial services charge by board size, not complexity. Larger boards will cost more even if they are completely blank. I once had to make an oversized PCB because the parts had to be spaced far apart. It was a very sparse board, but getting it made from even the cheapest commercial source would have been expensive.

Make high-quality double-sided PCBs – at home - [Link]


4 Dec 2014

pcb1f4

by Michael Dunn @ edn.com:

The first batch of test PCBs has arrived from Maker Studio, and overall, I like what I see.

Maker Studio’s basic board fab service supplies 10 PCBs for $9.99, with a basic international shipping cost of around $7. Interestingly, you get to choose shipping from several countries, including China, Singapore, and Sweden! Does this mean there are several fab sites? IIRC, I chose Sweden for my order.

Quick-Turn PCB shop review project: Maker Studio - [Link]

5 Nov 2014

CS

by Michael Dunn @ edn.com:

Well, the “Test PCB” project is finally underway. In case you don’t remember my original blog, the idea is to send a PCB design out to a half-dozen or so low-cost PCB prototype shops, then review their service and quality.

I’ve created a 6 × 6cm double-sided design for this project. I would have made it larger, but at least one fab’s prices (I’m looking at you, OSH Park) rise steeply with board size, and I wanted to keep within budget.

Quick-Turn PCB shop review project: Step 1, the PCB - [Link]

31 Oct 2014

In this tutorial Dave explains what a PCB spark gap is and how it can be a useful zero cost addition to your PCB layout to help prevent ESD damage.
He shows how to easily design them into your board and calculate the approximate voltage rating.
And of course has some fun applying 5kV to some gaps to show how them at work.

EEVblog #678 – What is a PCB Spark Gap? - [Link]

24 Oct 2014

Introducing PCBWeb Designer, our new desktop schematic capture and layout tool that’s free and easy to use.  Create multi-sheet schematics, use the parts toolbar that includes the Digi-Key parts catalog, in a browsable and searchable database.  The PCB view is always in sync with your schematic, and includes all the tools you need to create a design with up to 12 layers.  Then you can keep your gerber files locally or send them off to one of our manufacturing partners for production from within the tool.  Download at www.pcbweb.com

Introducing PCBWeb Designer - [Link]

13 Oct 2014

FBS5OK4HZN0SSTG.MEDIUM

by mlerman @ instructables.com:

This is the second version of my E260 modification. It uses an ATtiny13 MCU to control the timing of the printer and make it possible to print double sided PCBs at home.

As an electronic hobbyist and inventor I often need to make printed circuit boards (PCBs) in single or small quantities. Usually these are relatively simple circuits, an MCU, some input conditioning circuitry, some output circuitry, and usually they are single sided or perhaps double sided, with just a few vias. And usually I want them right now!

Toner Transfer (TT) has become the method of choice for most hobbyists. A laser printer is used to print an image of the PCB on special “transfer paper” which is then placed on the bare copperclad board and either ironed on or run through a modified laminator to transfer the image to the copper. When the PCB is etched, the toner acts as a resist, preserving the copper below it while the rest of the copper surface is etched away.

Modification of the Lexmark E260 for Direct Laser Printing of Printed Circuit Boards - [Link]

3 Sep 2014

FWFD78NHZB3KLEC.MEDIUM

by synthdood @ instructables.com:

I have been an avid electronics DIY guy for many years now, and I have spent a lot of that time struggling to learn how to make my own PCBs. I have tried every technique that I have come across on the internet, from iron-on print outs to dry photosensitive blue sheets. Sometimes I was successful in my efforts to make a passable PCB, but when it was time to reproduce those results, something would go wrong.

After a lot of attempts and frustration, I was determined to find a solution that didn’t result in me sending my files off to a PCB fab house. I use a fab house after I have tested a design on a homemade PCB. I finally found a solution where I can reproduce aesthetically pleasing PCBs by using liquid negative photo-sensitive paint. In this Instructable, I will share with you a technique that I have developed to do this.

DIY PCB using Liquid Photoresist - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

Search Site | Advertising | Contact Us
Elektrotekno.com | Free Schematics Search Engine | Electronic Kits