TTGO Micro-32 is a Module for ESP32-PICO-D4 SiP

The ESP32-PICO-D4 is a new variant of the known ESP32 SoC released by Espressif Systems. The PICO variant module measures around 13x19mm and it is designed as a system-in-package unlike the SoC styled ESP32, and comes with an ESP32 dual-core processor, a 4MB SPI flash, a crystal oscillator and come other accompanying components.

The ESP32-PICO-D4 SIP is designed for applications that are space conscious and looking to have less external components as possible. Applications like wearables, IoT devices, sensors, and battery operated devices will highly benefit from using this ESP32 variant, and it comes with the general functionality of the ESPP32 with network connectivity like WiFi and Bluetooth present.

Ever since the ESP32-PICO-D4 SIP was launched about a year ago, there has been little or no availability of a compact size module for use. The TTGO Micro-32 is a module based around the ESP32-PICO-D4 SIP with the hope of bringing more limelight to the ESP32 package.

The TTGO Module is a very compact module that can be used at the core of most ESP32 embedded applications, and it measures just about 19.2 x 13.3 mm which is about 45% smaller than the ESP32-WROOM-32 module.

Below are some of the TTGO Micro-32 module specifications:

  • SiP – Espressif Systems ESP32-PICO-D4 based on the ESP32 dual-core processor
  • Memory – 4MB SPI Flash
  • Connectivity –
    • Bluetooth 4.2 LE
    • 802.11 b/g/n WiFi up to 150 Mbps with chip antenna and u.FL (IPEX) connector
  • Power Voltage – 3.3DC Volts
  • Dimensions – 19.2 x 13.3 mm

The module is expected to be software compatible with the ESP-WROOM-32, and it doesn’t have any specific software attached to it. The TTGO Micro32 module is available for purchase on Banggood at a price of about $7. A similar TTGO Micro-32 module is available on Aliexpress for a lesser price of about $4.7.

Tiny Machine-Code Monitor

This project is a machine-code monitor that you program from a hexadecimal keypad using a simplified instruction set. by David Johnson-Davies

It’s a good project for learning about the fundamentals of machine code, and will also appeal to people who like programming challenges. The simplified machine code, called MINIL, is designed to be easy to learn and understand. It’s similar to the Little Minion Computer [1] used in some universities to teach students about machine code. The same method could be used to emulate other simple processors, such as the SC/MP, 6800, 8080, or 6502.

Tiny Machine-Code Monitor – [Link]

Virtual Helium Atom with Virtual Breadboard Infinity-Shield

How to connect the Helium Arduino stack with the Google IoT Core Channel using the Infinity-Shield mixed reality hardware emulator for VBB. by James Caska:

I have been developing Virtual Breadboard since 1999. It’s a fun way to learn about microcontrollers in a virtual sandbox and since I added the Arduino it’s been quite popular.

For several years now I have been working on ‘breaking out’ of the sandbox to mix virtual and real components together. These days there is a word for this – mixed reality.

Mixed reality addresses important limitations of the Virtual Breadboard sandbox and at the same time opens amazing up new possibilities of it’s own.

Virtual Helium Atom with Virtual Breadboard Infinity-Shield – [Link]

VIA Snapdragon 820 Based SOM now compatible with Linux

VIA Technologies known for its array of embedded boards and solutions has announced the release of a Linux Board Support Package (BSP) based on the Yocto 2.0.3 for the VIA SOM-9×20 module.

The VIA SOM 9×20 module was custom designed and meant for the Android platform and so migrating to a Linux framework was something that was inevitable and less tedious to achieve as compared to migrating to a different framework.

According to the Richard Brown, the Vice-president of International Marketing at VIA, he says that –

The release of the Linux BSP gives our customers an additional option for the development of Edge AI systems and devices powered by the Qualcomm® Snapdragon™ 820E Embedded Platform

The Linux BSP is expected to provide features like:

  • Supports UFS boot
  • Supports HDMI display
  • Supports AUO MIPI capacitive touch panels through the USB interface
  • AUO 10.1” B101UAN01.7 (1920×1200)
  • Supports COM as debug port
  • Supports two Gigabit Ethernet
  • Supports Mic-in and stereo 2W speaker
  • Supports built-in Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac, Bluetooth 4.1, and GPS
  • Supports MIPI CSI camera OV13850

The VIA SOM 9×20 module is one of those modules you can’t afford to pass you by. At the heart of the module is the powerful Qualcomm Snapdragon 820E embedded platform, the high performance embedded platform designed to power the next generation of mobile devices and applications with low power consumption, and an array of possible connectivity.

 

The SOM 9×20 module measures at about 82 x 45mm in a SODIMM styled form factor. It features four Cortex-A72-like cores Kryo cores: two at 2.2GHz and two at 1.6GHz. The SoC is boosted with an integrated Adreno 530 GPU at 624MHz, Hexagon 680 DSP, and 14-bit Spectra ISP. The module ships with an inbuilt 64GB eMMC Flash memory, 4GB LPDDR4 in a POP package, rich I/O and display expansion options through its MXM 3.0 314-pin connector.

It supports USB 3.0, USB 2.0, HDMI 2.0, SDIO, PCIe, MIPI CSI, MIPI DSI, and multi-function pins for UART, I2C, SPI, and GPIO through the MXM connector. Other possibilities include interfaces for  MIPI-CSI and LCD touchscreen, dual speakers, and a mini-PCIe slot.

VIA also announced a $569 price for the evaluation kit package, which combines the Snapdragon 820 based module with its SOMDB2 Carrier Board. In order to simplify the design, testing, and deployment of intelligent Edge AI applications, VIA is making the SOM 9X20 module to be available as part of its Edge AI Developer Kit, which features a SOMDB2 Carrier Board and optional 13MP camera module that is optimized for intelligent real-time video capture, processing, and edge analysis.

The kit is available in two configurations from the VIA Embedded online store at:

  • VIA SOM-9X20 SOM Module and SOMDB2 Carrier Board with 13MP CMOS Camera Module (COB 1/3.06” 4224×3136 pixels): US$629 plus shipping
  • VIA SOM-9X20 SOM Module and SOMDB2 Carrier Board: US$569 plus shipping
  • Optional 10.1” MIPI LCD touch panel: US$179 plus shipping.

The Linux BSP for the VIA SOM 9X20 module is available now, and also an upgraded android 8.0 is available as well. More information about the product is available on the product page.

How to select the right thyristor (SCR) for your application

SCR fundamentals discussed in this app note from STMicroelectronics. For an Introduction to Thyristors check here.

This document provides some guidelines about how to select the right thyristor, also referred to as “SCR”, according to the different applications. Some very specific cases could require a higher level of expertise to ensure reliable and efficient operation.

How to select the right thyristor (SCR) for your application – [Link]

Make Smart WiFi Router Using Raspberry Pi 3

Here’s how to make a smart WiFi router using the Raspberry Pi 3. by Mehedi Shakeel:

In this video, I will show you how to make a smart WiFi router using the Raspberry Pi 3. This tutorial provides a step by step guide on how to set up the Raspberry Pi as a hotspot and make it function as a smart WiFi router. Now you’ll be able to use your Raspberry Pi 3 like any router for WiFi connection.

Make Smart WiFi Router Using Raspberry Pi 3 – [Link]

Michigan Micro Mote – The World’s Smallest Computer

The battle of the world smallest computer is something the researchers at the University of Michigan don’t attempt to give up anytime soon with the introduction of the Michigan Micro Mote, a computer smaller than a grain of rice.

The Michigan Micro Mote has helped researchers at the University of Michigan remain top in the competition of the creation of the world’s smallest computer. IBM took the title in March 2018 with the release of their 1mm x 1mm computer that measured smaller than a grain of fancy salt at its Think 2018 conference; however, the Michigan Micro Mote has put the University of Michigan back at the top.

One major talk about the new computer built and even the previous one by IBM is if the so-called computer can be called a Computer. Reason being, it is hard to decide if the micro mote is a computer or not since they don’t satisfy some computer requirements like the ability to keep data when power runs out.

According to David Blaauw, a professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Michigan,

We are not sure if they should be called computers or not. It’s more of a matter of opinion whether they have the minimum functionality required.

Be low are the features and capabilities of the Micro Mote:

  • It cannot retain programming and data once there is a power loss
  • This super tiny computer uses photovoltaics: a way of converting light to electricity to enable an exchange of data.
  • It has a base station which provides light for power and programming. It also receives data. Light from the base station and the transmission LED (Light Emitting Diode) creates currents in the tiny circuits.
  • There are wireless transmitters for transmitting data with visible light.
  • Presence of precision sensor to convert temperature into time intervals that come with electronic pulses.
  • The Michigan Micro Mote has a LED, system memory and a processor.
  • Dimensions of the computer are 0.3 by 0.3 by 0.3mm. It is shorter than a grain of rice.
  • Can measure temperature in super tiny regions such as a cluster of cells, with an accuracy of 0.1 degree Celsius.

Despite the very tiny size, the Micro mote might find applications in the following areas:

  • It can be used for advanced cancer studies.
  • Useful during pressure sensing inside the eye for glaucoma diagnosis.
  • Can be used for oil reservoir monitoring.
  • Biochemical process monitoring.
  • It comes in handy when studying tiny snails.
  • Can be used for Audio and visual surveillance.

David Blaauw, Dennis Sylvester created the Michigan Micro Mote; both are professors of Electronics and Communication Engineering (ECE) at the University, and Jamie Phillips, an Arthur F. Thurnau professors of ECE. A study on the microcomputer was presented at the 2018 Symposia on VLSI Technology and Circuits on June 21.

LTM4678 – Dual 25 A or Single 50 A μModule® Regulator with Digital Power System Management

LTM4678  – Dual 25A or Single 50A µModule Regulator with Digital Power System Management from www.analog.com

  • Dual, digitally adjustable analog loops with digital interface for control and monitoring
  • Wide input voltage range: 4.5 V to 16 V
  • Output voltage range: 0.5 V to 3.3 V
  • ±0.5% maximum dc output error over temperature
  • ±5% current readback accuracy

LTM4678  – Dual 25 A or Single 50 A μModule® Regulator with Digital Power System Management – [Link]

I2C – Everything you need to know

I2C – Everything you need to know article from www.mikroe.com

There is no need for a wordy introduction to I2C protocol. We all know it’s main parts – 2 wires, multiple slaves, sometimes multiple masters, up to 5MHz of speed. Often so have we all implemented an I2C connection. Still, every now and then, there’s that module that just won’t work. This time, we will do an in-depth research about the I2C protocol, and try to cover as much ground as possible.

I2C – Everything you need to know – [Link]

Dual Channel SiC MOSFET Gate Driver Reference Design

This reference design is an automotive qualified isolated gate driver solution for driving Silicon Carbide (SiC) MOSFETs in half bridge configuration. The design includes two push pull bias supplies for the dual channel isolated gate driver respectively and each supply provides +15V and -4V output voltage and 1W output power. The gate driver is capable of delivering 4A source and 6A sink peak current. It implements reinforced isolation and can withstand 8kV Peak and 5.7kV RMS isolation voltage and >100V/ns common mode transient immunity (CMTI). The reference design contains the two-level turn-off circuit which protects the MOSFET from voltage overshoot during the short circuit scenario. The DESAT detection threshold and the delay time for second stage turn-off are configurable. The ISO7721-Q1 digital isolator is implemented for interfacing the signals of fault and reset. All designed on a two layer PCB board with a compact form factor of 40mm × 40mm.

[source: http://www.ti.com]