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16 Sep 2014

SCHEMA-ELETTRICO-500x478

By Christian Granvillano @ open-electronics.org:

Today we’ll explain how to exploit the potential of Arduino as a programmable logic controller, connecting it to appropriate interfaces for I/O.

The PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) has been and still is the basic component of the industrial automation world. The Industrial application made the PLC systems being very expensive, both to buy and repair, and also because of the highly specific skills requested to software designers to extract the maximum potentials from controllers. Arduino is a kind of universal programmable controller, although it is only the “core” and in any case it has been built for general applications; with a little of external hardware (essentially interfaces capable of transferring signals from sensors and to actuators, reducing the EMI which may damage the microcontroller) and an appropriate software may, however, become something very similar to a PLC.

Arduino as a programmable logic controller (PLC) - [Link]

15 Sep 2014

Javier from CookingHacks writes:

We made a step by step article about how to track vehicles using Arduino + GPRS / GPS. Then we integrated the information using the Google Maps API. All the code is available with open source license.

Realtime GPS+GPRS tracking of vehicles using Arduino - [Link]

13 Sep 2014

20140901_171702

by Jose Daniel Herrera:

Here I present another project based on a addressable LEDs strip, based on WS2812b leds.

It consists of an ‘electronic’ candle, which lets you select set colors, adjust the intensity, and have different effects like rainbow, fade and fire. The project arose from the purchase of an IKEA lantern model BORBY … the idea was to replace a candle of considerable size, for something more … modern.

Candle with remote control and Arduino Pro Mini - [Link]

13 Sep 2014

IMG_1187-Copy

Matt of SkyLabs has a nice build log about a temperature controlled reflow oven he built using an Arduino based PID controller and a standard toaster oven:

We have successfully managed to build a temperature controlled reflow oven using an Arduino based PID controller and a standard toaster oven from Robert Dyas! This is a must have accessory for any hobbyist who regularly uses surface mount components within their designs. Below we have a build log documenting the process of constructing the oven including:
Teardown of the original oven
Custom enclosure construction
Control Methods
Arduino Installation

So to start off I will outline a basic parts list of what I used:
Arduino Uno
Reflow Oven Shield
Solid State Relay
K-Type Thermocouple
230v AC to 5v DC Power Supply
Custom Laser Cut Enclosure

[via]

Temperature controlled reflow oven build - [Link]


13 Sep 2014

Charles Edward Pax has announced that the T400 temperature datalogger is now being offered on Kickstarter!

The Pax Instruments T400 datalogger is an open source four-channel thermocouple temperature datalogger based on the Arduino™ Leonardo platform. It is ready to use out of the box with the features you want most. Measurements can be logged to MicoSD card, printed to serial port, and graphed. The T400 is a great tool for anything from live thermal process monitoring in the lab to long-term environmental data collection in the field.

[via]

Data logger handles four thermocouples - [Link]

12 Sep 2014

conjunto_gps_big

raj @ embedded-lab.com writes:

Check out Cooking Hacks Arduino-based GPS tracker project for vehicles that could be extremely helpful to pinpoint the exact location of the vehicle in case it is stolen. The project uses a GPS+GPRS shield with an antenna to locate the coordinates of the vehicle. You need to call the device from your preset phone number, which will be verified by the SIM908 module on the tracker, and it will then send you an SMS with the GPS coordinates of its location.

Real-time GPS tracking device for vehicles - [Link]

12 Sep 2014

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by fileark @ electronhacks.com:

BMO from Comedy Central’s Adventure Time is adorable, if only someone would make one that can walk! Atleast we can make one with a personality. Here is a build using easy to get parts including Arduino Pro  Mini, Nokia 3310 LCD screen, audio playback, accelerometers, and distance sensors.

The parts added up to around $70.00

DIY Arduino Mini BMO - [Link]

11 Sep 2014

usbasp-600x406

JohnLittle writes:

I finally got round playing with my AVRASP v2.0 boards. The ones Sleepwalker3 mentioned. Thanks mate!
I bought three USBASP v2.0 on ebay for under £1.50 each. They each came with a short cable (5×2 sockets at each end). However, they do not come with the JP2 header soldered on. Solder it or you won’t be able to re-flash the on-board ATmega8 chip. JP3 on the other hand has been deprecated. It may still have some use in your own projects. You decide!

Then download some software (this is for Windows): To use the USBASP programmer with the Arduino IDE, you will need to download the driver, latest firmware and WinAVR-20100110-install.

Using a USBASP v2.0 as a cheap ATmega8 Arduino platform - [Link]

8 Sep 2014

SolarBatteryCharger

by embedded-lab.com:

This Arduino Nano controlled solar battery charger can charge a standard lead acid 12V battery and runs with 90% efficiency under 70ᵒC (158ᵒF). The circuit can take up to 24V input from the solar panels. The maximum power point tracking is implemented in the circuit by measuring the output voltage and current from the solar panel to get the maximum possible power from it.

Solar battery charge controller - [Link]

8 Sep 2014

NewImage39

Meter clock: keeping “current” time. Read more about the clock:

I’ve seen a few meter clocks in my travels of the web, and I love the idea. A few days ago, I decided that I must have one of my own. Such began the “How to do it” pondering cycle. I had seen builds where the face plate of the meter is replaced. This works, but I wanted to try and find a way to do it without modifying the meter, if possible. After some more ponderation, I came up with what I think is a serviceable idea.

I came across this style of milliamp meter on Amazon. They’re not quite 0-60 mA, but the 0-100 mA (a 0-20mA meter for the hours) is close enough. And they were cheap. So yay.

Part of my requirements were that the clock run off of an Arduino Pro Mini I had lying around, and with minimal additional parts. In order to drive the meters with some degree of precision, I would use the PWM pins to vary the effective voltage across a resistor in series with the meter. This would, by the grace of Ohm’s Law, induce a current that, based on the PWM duty cycle, would be scaled in such a way as to move the needle on the meter to the corresponding hour, minute, or second.

One minor issue came up in the form of the max current the GPIO pins on the ATMega328 chip can source/sink. The pins can source/sink a maximum of 40mA, a bit far from the 60mA needed for the minutes and seconds meters. Enter the transistor.

Using a simple NPN transistor switch circuit, I was able to provide the current for the minute and second meters from the 5V supply. The PWM signals switch the respective transistors on and off, effectively varying the voltage across the resistors in series with the meters.

The resistor between 5V and the meter is actually 2 1/4 watt 100 Ohm resistors in parallel for an effective resistance of 50 Ohms. The two in parallel was necessary as 5V x 0.06A = 0.3W (more than 0.25 that a single 1/4W resistor can handle safely).

[via]

Meter clock: keeping “current” time - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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