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22 Jan 2014

This article describes how to use infra-red (IR) sensor with Arduino or with a simple OPAMP comparator. Lee Zhi Xian writes:

What is infra-red (IR)? Infra-red is an electromagnetic wave who wavelength is between 0.75 microns to 1000 microns (1 micron = 1µm). Since infra-red is out of visible light range, we can’t really see IR with naked eye. However, there is a method to “see” IR which will be shown later on. Some of the infra-red applications includes night vision, hyperspectral imaging, and communications. We also use IR daily in our TV remote or any device remote.

IR transmitter and receiver can be obtained at low price. Their shape is looks exactly the same as LED. To distinguish between transmitter and receiver, the transmitter always come in clear LED while receiver is black in colour. Other than that, there is also receiver that is used to pick up specific frequency IR, 38kHz. For your information, 38kHz frequency IR is commonly used in remote control.

How to use infra-red (IR) sensor with Arduino - [Link]

14 Jan 2014

NavSpark is an arduino-compatible board with GPS for less then $20:

NavSpark is a small, powerful, breadboard-friendly, 32bit development board that is Arduino compatible, with a world class GPS receiver as on-board peripheral, and under $15.

There is also NavSpark-BD, a variant model having world-class GPS/Beidou receiver as on-board peripheral, that enables you to adopt new GPS/Beidou satellite navigation technology when Broadcom Qualcomm just recently came out with solution supporting Beidou to their tier-1 smartphone customers like Apple and Samsung.

NavSpark puts leading edge satellite navigation technology in the hands of the makers.

NavSpark: Arduino Compatible with GPS GNSS Receiver - [Link]

18 Dec 2013

FBCTV8JH7UR801K.LARGE

ricardouvina @ instructables.com writes:

Hello guys! In this instructable I’ll teach you how to make a very simple proximity sensor using infrared LEDs and Arduino.

Simple IR proximity sensor with Arduino - [Link]

18 Dec 2013

ads1110

John Boxall over at Tronixstuff has a series of Arduino tutorials. This chapter fifty-three of a series will show you how to use the TI ADS1110 16-bit ADC with Arduino:

Moving on from the last chapter where we explained an 8-bit ADC, in this instalment we have the Texas Instruments ADS1110 – an incredibly tiny but useful 16-bit analogue-to-digital converter IC. It can operate between 2.7 and 5.5 V so it’s also fine for Arduino Due and other lower-voltage development boards. This is a quick guide to get you going with the ADS1110 ready for further applications.

[via]

Tutorial – Arduino and the TI ADS1110 16-bit ADC - [Link]


6 Dec 2013

86Duino_ZERO-45D

DM&P has been producing low-power, x86-based Vortex processors for the embedded market for over ten years. Now in a nod to the Arduino market they have released the 86Duino Zero, a low-cost Arduino Leonardo sized board powered by their latest 300 MHz SoC Vortex86EX Processor.

This is a fully static 32-bit x86 processor board compatible with Windows OS, Linux and most other popular 32-bit RTOS. It integrates a PCIE bus, DDR3, ROM controller, xISA, I2C, SPI, IPC (Internal Peripheral Controllers with DMA and interrupt timer/counter included). The 86Duino Zero’s ports include USB 2.0 host and device coastline ports, a 10/100 Ethernet port and a microSD slot on the bottom of the board. The Zero’s baseboard also provides a 7-12V power jack, a reset button and a PCIe expansion connector.

The Zero supplies 14 digital I/O pins, half of which can provide 32-bit resolution PWM outputs and six 11-bit analog input pins. Each standard I/O pin supplies 16 mA while the 3.3 V pins can supply up to 400 mA. Like the Intel Galileo development board announced several weeks ago the 86Duino Zero marries Intel architecture to the Arduino platform. Its $39 price tag makes it an attractive proposition. [via]

The 86Duino Zero Runs Linux on x86 - [Link]

29 Nov 2013

gertduino2

Gert van Loo, the Broadcom employee responsible for the RPi alpha build has now come up with the Gertduino. He also gave us the GertBoard GPIO Expansion board some time ago which provides general purpose I/Os, LEDs and motor driver capabilities for the Rpi. Gert’s latest creation, the Gertduino board, plugs onto the RPi and connects it to virtually any existing Arduino Shield. The board itself basically offers the same functionality as the Arduino-Uno but with some added features thrown in.

As well as an ATmega328 and ATmega48 (both of which can be programmed from the Raspberry Pi using the Arduino GUI or the GCC Atmel compiler), the Gertduino packs a real time clock, 16MHz oscillator, IRDA interface, RS232 level converter and a battery back-up power supply for the ATmega48.

Gertduino: The Raspberry Pi /Arduino Missing Link - [Link]

27 Nov 2013

Cortado connects your physical things to the digital world.  Itʼs an Arduino that youʼll never plug in, and it works on all your favorite platforms including mobile (Mac, Windows, iOS, Android).  It connects via Bluetooth Low Energy, an efficient protocol meant for supporting low-power sensors.  If there ever was a building block for the Internet of Things, this is it.

It’s so easy to interact with Cortado, we think it will inspire an entirely new interaction flow.  To illustrate this, the pre-ordered units will be turned on before they ship. If you download our app, you will get a BLE notification on your iPhone when your Cortado is nearby. Youʼll even be able to program it while it’s still in the box!

For the next month we will be holding a pre-order campaign featuring our new product. This campaign includes a special pre-order discounted price for all backers. It will launch at $18 and will increase every day as the month goes on reaching a maximum of $24, which is discounted 20% from the retail price ($30).

Cortado – Zero wires. Infinite uses - [Link]

27 Nov 2013

squarewear2_annotation-600x338

SquareWear 2.0, an open source wearable Arduino by Rayshobby:

This is SquareWear 2.0, an open-source, wearable Arduino microcontroller board. This version measures 1.7″x1.7″ in size, and has built-in LIR2032 rechargeable Lithium coin battery. It also has a number of integrated components (see below). It is designed to be sewable: you can stich conductive threads through the large pin pads, solder a wire directly onto the pads, or solder snaps onto the pads to allow quick attachment or detacthment from textfile and fabric. Best of all, it’s based on Arduino, so you can make use of numerous available Arduino libraries to help build your project! SqureWear 2.0 is perfect for wearable electronic projects as well as general-purpose microcontroller projects. It’s also a great little board for learning Arduino programming.

[via]

SquareWear 2.0 — an open source wearable Arduino - [Link]

22 Nov 2013

self-balancing-bot-1-600x400

Bajdi documented his Arduino self balancing bot build:

For the electronics I used one of my own PCB creations, a Bajduino of course It’s just a small (50x50mm) break out board for an ATmega328. I’m running the ATmega @ 16MHz and 3.3V. It’s out of spec according to the datasheet but it works… I also needed an IMU of course. I found a MP6050 sensor in my parts box. The MPU6050 combines a 3 DOF gyro and 3 DOF accelerometer in a small package, ideal for a self balancing bot.

[via]

Building a self balancing bot - [Link]

21 Nov 2013

handmade_pcb

BO.Duino is an Arduino compatible board based on ATmega328 ATMEL’s mcu. This board features many peripherals usually externally connected on a breadboard or prototyping board such as sensors, SD card etc. Peripherals included are:

– A real-time clock
– AT24 series external memory chip
– MicroSD card adaptor (SPI)
– RGB LED
– A potentiometer on analog input
– Connector for DS18b20 or DHt11 series sensors

BO.Duino – ATmega328 Arduino Compatible board - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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