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11 Jul 2014

H

by elektor.com:

Trulife Optics together with the National Physics Laboratory has demonstrated a new type of transparent head-up display device. According to Simon Hall, lead scientist of Adaptive Optics at the NPL the new technology is unlike existing solutions: “Google’s solution is effectively a prism; it’s like a half-silvered mirror that you’re looking into and the Epson Moverio uses an embedded, slightly different refractive index component in a very thick lens which is reflecting light travelling through the rather thick waveguide”.

This new component is set to transform the development of wearable augmented reality and head-up display devices. Jonathan Lewis, CEO at Trulife optics commented that, “The development of wearable augmented reality devices has been curtailed by the lack of an optical component that allows for the overlay of high-definition, full colour images. But with the launch of our optic, we are providing that missing piece in the augmented reality jigsaw.”

Novel Wearable Optical Display - [Link]

11 Jul 2014

IMG_20140518_115041-600x337

Tom Cousins of DOAYEE made this DIY nixie tube clock:

Below is the schematic for the project, as you can see I’m using 6 IN12 nixie tubes, each with it’s own 74141 nixie tube driver. These drivers are great! They simply connect directly to the nixies and display whatever 4 bit binary number you give them (if you give them anything above 9 they blank the display – hence why I use the number 10 in my code to blank the nixies). Because they take in a simple 4 bit binary number, I can hook them directly up to some shift registers to drive them, in my case I used 3 74HC595 shift registers (available everywhere), because they can be “daisy chained” together, meaning in the code I only have to write one 24 bit binary number and it will display all 6 numbers on the nixies. Though in reality I split them up into pairs and write three 8 bit binary numbers.

[via]

Nixie tube clock - [Link]

10 Jul 2014

F2x600

by Steve Taranovich @ www.edn.com:

Freescale Semiconductor introduced the MM9Z1J638, AEC-Q100 qualified intelligent battery sensors with three measurement channels, a 16/32-bit MCU and a CAN protocol module in one 7 x 7 mm 48-pin QFN package.

The market this product serves is quite diversified with 12 V lead acid batteries, 14 V Li-Ion batteries, Lead acid multi-batteries, HV battery junction box, Energy Storage Systems (ESS), Uninterrupted Power Systems (UPS) and industrial automation.

Today’s trends in the battery market include complex battery algorithms, higher communication data rates with the CAN bus, better safety for Li-Ion batteries and increased mission-critical dependence on energy availability.

Start-stop requirements, together with others such as regenerative braking and intelligent alternator control, are driving demand for more precise sensing of the battery’s state to provide early failure warnings.

Intelligent battery sensor for automotive and industrial - [Link]

10 Jul 2014

obr1554_1

There´s only one original, even though with a fake, it´s possible to “gain” also something unwanted – hours of debugging and costs for exchange.

Copying of products and components is perhaps as old as an industrial production is. Logically – it´s easier to jump up to a “running train” (to copy a renowned product) than to develop something new. Everyone, who develops an electronic device probably can confirm, that it´s demanding and expensive. Similarly it´s also at development of chips. Well known and widely used chips for a USB interface . from company FTDI belong to the most popular on the market. No wonder, that it´s fakes appeared on the market, with the same appearance as an original (on the first sight). Despite the fact, that the price of the FT232RL chip is relatively very affordable, a vision of a cheaper purchase was certainly attractive though expensively paid at the end.

On the enclosed photo, there´s an original on the left side and the fake on the right side. It´s visible, that the original has a laser engraved marking, while the fake has it only printed. But that wouldn´t be a problem… Fake worked so-so well until the time, when FTDI upgraded drivers with a utility able to detect fake products. In case of fake, the USB communication fails (sends only zeroes).

On the enclosed photo, there´s an original on the left side and the fake on the right side. It´s visible, that the original has a laser engraved marking, while the fake has it only printed. But that wouldn´t be a problem… Fake worked so-so well until the time, when FTDI upgraded drivers with a utility able to detect fake products. In case of fake, the USB communication fails (sends only zeroes).

The result is clear in this case – exchange of non-working fakes from target devices (from customers! is significantly more expensive that a usage of an original would be. And how to be certain about the authenticity of the component? – by a purchase from an authorized distributor. SOS electronic is already for many years an authorized distributor of FTDI with a close cooperation and an above-standard technical support.

Be aware of the FTDI chips fakes - [Link]


10 Jul 2014

20140604_234359-600x450

Chris Holden of NerdClub shares his tips on how he successfully program an ATMega128:

Finally got an ATMega128 chip coded and programmed successfully. The great news is it doesn’t require Arduino. The even better news is, we can use Oshonsoft to write the code! Yay.

[via]

Programming an ATMega128 - [Link]

9 Jul 2014

F9Z1SYQHX42QUO2.MEDIUM

Nikus @ instructables.com writes:

I will show you how to build a bike speedometer. It shows your speed, the average speed,the temperature, the trip time and the total distance. You can change it using the button. Additionally, the speed is shown on a tachometer. I built it because I like building new things, I have not found anything like this on the Internet so I want to show you how to build a good speedometer as the one on my bike is not as cool as I want :) . So let’s get started.

DIY bike tachometer - [Link]

9 Jul 2014

sand-lithium-ion-battery

By Darren Quick @ gizmag.com:

Conventional lithium-ion batteries rely on anodes made of graphite, but it is widely believed that the performance of this material has reached its zenith, prompting researchers to look at possible replacements. Much of the focus has been on nanoscale silicon, but it remains difficult to produce in large quantities and usually degrades quickly. Researchers at the University of California, Riverside have overcome these problems by developing a lithium-ion battery anode using sand.

Sand-based anode triples lithium-ion battery performance - [Link]

9 Jul 2014

oled_case

Jared Sanson @ jared.geek.nz writes:

So it’s been a while since I last posted about my OLED watch, and I’ve done a lot of work on it! (And also broke it multiple times)

It’s taken me a lot of work to get this far, and I developed EVERYTHING from the ground up. The electronics design, the PCB layout, the RTOS and firmware drivers, the graphics engine, the user-mode app code, and even USB communications apps. I’ve used C, C#, and Python extensively in this project, and Altium Designer for the schematic and PCB.

Overall it has been an awesome learning experience, and if I was to make another one I would do a lot of things differently!

OLED Watch Is Alive! - [Link]

9 Jul 2014

WallLight-DSO

by Daniel @ nupo-artworks.de :

I started this project 2 days before we went to France for a 2 week holiday but since this is a really quick project the lamp worked fine after 2 days. Now when we came back I gave it the last touches and finished some bugs in the software.

Initially this lamp should be a replacement for a lamp in our living room but I was way too greedy with the WS2812B LEDs. Eventually, the lamp wasn’t bright enough so I’m going to mount it now in the sleeping room as one of those morning, sun imitating lamps. As a controller I’m going to use a Raspberry PI with a node script that will also control some other devices in my house like my Wall Clock.

IKEA ceiling lamp LED modification - [Link]

9 Jul 2014

PWM_controller

Ondrej Karas of DoItWireless writes:

This is simple illustration how to build easy PWM LED control with IQRF TR module and a few other components.

This device is powered from 12V/6A DC power supply and can power up to 5m of LED strip. This device can be controlled via RF, buttons or potentiometer. RF controlling is compatible with remote control device RC-04 with low battery signalizing – fast 3 time LED blinking.

RF PWM LED control - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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