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4 May 2014

1-thermoelectr

(Phys.org) —

A group of Korean researchers have turned their focus on supplying a reliable, efficient power source for wearables. Professor Byung Jin Cho of the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) and his team, recognizing that supplying power that is stable and reliable is critical to the successful commercialization of wearables, have come up with a wearable power band that made technology news this week. The team noted that a flexible thermoelectric (TE) power generator would be the way to go to realize a wearable self-powered mobile device. They developed a wearable band-shaped item that produces electricity from the heat of the human body, The device size is 10 cm x 10 cm. Wearable electronics must be light, flexible, and equipped with a power source, which could be a portable, long-lasting battery or no battery at all but a generator, according to a KAIST release on Thursday, providing details about their work.

Power arm band for wearables harvests body heat - [Link]

3 May 2014

13904018080_6d2b97282f

Ioannis Kedros writes:

Another quick project for today! How all started? A few hours ago I took a delivery box with few high resolution LCD’s on it. The box was made of foam material and was covered with dirty (from the delivery across two continents) yellowish tape.

To begin with, in order to open the box I had to remove half of this tape and by “playing” with the box I manage to remove everything without to damage it! Yes, the tape was strong enough to tear apart everything! The result is the one below

Rescuing a foam box - [Link]

3 May 2014

rcjNano_3Dprinter_IBM_NanoFrazor_SwissLitho_AFM

A microscopic 3D printer enables chip designers to quickly prototype new semiconductors structures as well as create light guides for photonics and quantum computers. [via]

IBM Debuts Microscopic 3D Printer - [Link]

3 May 2014

voltmeter-using-arduinoby praveen:

This article is about a simple 3 digit voltmeter using arduino. The circuit can measure anything between 0 to 5V at an accuracy of 50mV. The circuit uses minimum number of external components and can be easily modified for different voltage ranges. The display device is a common anode multiplexed seven segment LED display module (Type No:E1-3056ASR1). Let’s have a look at the display device first.

Voltmeter using arduino - [Link]


3 May 2014

Doug Ford, former head designer from Rode Microphones continues with Part 2 of the microphone technology series by explaining the construction of noise cancelling Figure 8, cardioid, and hyper cardioid microphones. Also, how the polar patterns and responses relate to the physical construction, and how the frequency response is affected.
Proximity boost effect,
Microphone calibration is also discussed using a home made artificial voice speaker box.
And practical considerations about foldback wedges used in stage performances and how to avoid feedback using proper microphone technique.

EEVblog #605 – Fig.8 & Cardioid Microphone Patterns - [Link]

3 May 2014

by w2aew:

An introduction to why and when terminations are needed for transmission lines in both high speed digital applications and RF applications. 50 ohm termination examples are given, but the principles apply for other line impedances as well. The basic operating principles of signal propagation down a transmission line and the effects of reflections coming from improperly terminated are covered. Examples for digital-like signals as well as RF signals are given. A description and examples of what is meant by Standing Waves is also given. As a bonus, the properties of quarter wavelength transmission lines in RF applications is also presented.

Transmission Line Terminations for Digital and RF signals - [Link]

3 May 2014

by bajdi.com:

I’ve been looking for ways to control my Service droid robot, my Service droid robot has an ATmega2560 (with Arduino bootloader) and a Raspberry Pi. My goal is to control it over wifi. But I wanted to start with some more simpler things first. I’ve recently found some python code on letsmakerobots.com that lets me sent data over I2C from a Raspberry Pi to a micro controller.

Before getting this to work you need to configure I2C on the Raspberry Pi. Adafruit has written a nice guide how to do this. I also installed the python-SMBus package: sudo apt-get install python-smbus.

Controlling an Arduino through a Rapsberry Pi webserver - [Link]

3 May 2014

pro-mini-undershield-2-600x400

Bajdi blogged about his Arduino pro mini undershield:

I’ve designed another PCB :) This time it’s a simple undershield for the Arduino pro mini. I received the PCB’s from Electrodragon (12$ for 10PCB’s) last week. The PCB has a schottky diode and a 5V linear regulator, I’m using an LM2940 5V regulator. For the rest there are just 2 rows of female headers to plug the pro mini in and 3 rows of male pins on each side.
The reason I’ve had this PCB made is that pro mini’s are dirt cheap these days, you can find them on Ebay or Chinese shops for mess then 4$. That makes them the cheapest Arduino on the internet. It’s cheaper and easier to buy a pro mini and integrate it in to your own project then to design your own PCB with an ATmega328.

[via]

Arduino pro mini undershield - [Link]

2 May 2014

TakeItApart_com

TakeItApart.com is a new website where you post your photos of disassembly guides. See how to take apart everyday things, and find things to do once inside. So simple, check it out!

TakeItApart.com – Your source for disassembly information - [Link]

2 May 2014

Untitled-1

By European Editors:

Military and aerospace, where rugged operation and reliable performance in a confined, hostile environment are paramount, have long been the most dominant markets for thermoelectric energy harvesting. Typically, thermoelectric devices exploit heat from engines and motors and use it to power sensors and wireless sensor networks for condition monitoring applications. Recent innovations are generating growth in this sector, as well as in allied sectors.

This article will review some of the major avionics and aerospace applications that use thermoelectric devices. For example, commercial and military aircraft incorporate sensors and sensor networks powered by thermoelectric generators to monitor the aircraft skin for damage that can cause stresses and structural weakness. In the aerospace sector, the Mars Rover, Curiosity, Galileo satellites, New Horizons space probes, and Cassini spacecraft are all TEG users.

Typical devices that will be considered include the CP range of TEGs from CUI, and the eTEC modules from Laird Technologies. Further consideration will be given to the management of energy generated by TEGs, with reference to the LTC3108 DC/DC converter from Linear Technology.

Thermoelectric Energy Generation Takes Flight for Aircraft and Spacecraft Monitoring - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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