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6 Mar 2015

100_4174

by retrotext.blogspot.co.uk:

I have just recently had solar pv installed, mainly to future proof my energy costs, I do not expect it to be like drilling for oil in my back garden, however the return looks to be encouraging.

The install gives you another single unit meter, from this you will see the total amount the panels produce, but that is about it.

I wanted to know how much the production was as it was happening, I discovered the light blinks on the front of the meter will flash 1000 times for each kWh of electricity which passes through. The rate of the flashing of the LED tells you how much power is currently passing through the meter.

A basic Arduino Solar PV Monitor - [Link]

3 Mar 2015

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The Qduino Mini is the first tiny Arduino compatible that has a built-in battery charger & fuel gauge.

The Qduino Mini is perfect to embed in your electronics projects, it’s super small, inexpensive, has a battery connector & charger built-in, & a fuel gauge that can tell you when to charge the battery!

The Qduino Mini is Arduino-compatible & 100% open source, hardware and software meaning that making and programming your first circuit is a breeze. Hardware is hard, so we decided to make it a little bit easier. The day that the first Qduino Mini ships, all of the design files, including EAGLE board files, schematic, and code will be released under an open source license. Here’s what it includes:

Qduino Mini: Arduino Compatible + Battery Charger & Monitor - [Link]

2 Mar 2015

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by dkschottt @ instructables.com:

Being new to Arduino I was a bit overwhelmed by the different ways to do things. So this is what I came up with!

I am using an Arduino UNO R3 clone but the connections I believe are the same for most Arduino’s or can be easily modified for your particular model. This project is the beginning of a UROV that I am building from the ground up and this is my first attempt to work with Arduino. I do not want to turn my UNO into a webserver if I can avoid it because of the shortage of memory and this project is just a few of the sensors that I want to use for my project. I am going to start out by using the premise that my project will eventually use RS485 to communicate serially from my UNO to the PC via a tether.

Getting Arduino data to a web Page - [Link]

28 Feb 2015

In this video we are going to build an Arduino Uno clone in a breadboard using only 5 parts.

Arduino Uno (ATMEGA328P) on a breadboard - [Link]


25 Feb 2015

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by Francesco Truzzi :

Some time ago I came across a new chip from TI, the HDC1000. It’s a temperature and humidity sensor with I2C interface and requires little to no additional components. It comes in an 8BGA package: we can all agree it’s pretty small.
Some of the peculiar characteristics of this chip are that it has a DRDYn pin which goes low any time there is a new reading from the chip (so you can precisely time your requests) and that the sensor is located on the bottom of the IC, so that it’s not exposed to dust and other agents that may false the readings. Also, it has an integrated heater that can remove humidity from the sensor.

So I developed a very small breakout board for this chip as well as an Arduino library (yay, my first one! raspberryPi and nodemcu might come next).

[via]

HDC1000 temperature and humidity sensor breakout, with Arduino library! - [Link]

24 Feb 2015

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Impress your friend with the ultimate geek’s Birthday Cake! A hand-made open source electronic cake with candles you can blow out!

  • Features 9 LED candles that you can blow on, to make them flicker and go out, like you do with a real birthday cake! Each candle blinks with random period and phase that depends on the intensity of the air flow
  • Piezo sensor and a special air trap to detect air flow with astounding sensitivity using resonance effect
  • Atmel ATTiny44 microcontroller on board with 4 kilobytes of flash memory and 256 bytes RAM
  • Open source hardware and firmware. Can be re-programmed with an ICSP programmer or Arduino board via Arduino IDE
  • Size 42 x 42 x 18 mm, weight 26g
  • Powered by a single AAAA/LR61 battery (included)
  • 3.3V step-up converter on board
  • Ultra low shutdown current (less than 1 uA in deep shutdown)
  • Hand-soldered using lead-free solder

BitCake – Electronic Birthday Cake - [Link]

24 Feb 2015

frequency-meter-using-arduino

by praveen @ circuitstoday.com:

Many guys here were asking for a frequency counter and at last I got enough time to make one. This frequency counter using arduino is based on the UNO version and can count up to 40KHz. A 16×2 LCD display is used for displaying the frequency count. The circuit has minimum external components and directly counts the frequency. Any way the amplitude of the input frequency must not be greater than 5V. If you want to measure signals over than 5V, additional limiting circuits have to be added and i will show it some other time. Now just do it with 5V signals.

Frequency counter using arduino - [Link]

19 Feb 2015

FZN5VW2I697PP2V.MEDIUM

by JohnnieT @ instructables.com:

It’s a cnc using Arduino UNO R3 , GCode Sender and GRBL. The cnc is made of wood thanks to the help of my father. It has taken us many hours to do the mechanical part however the electronic part is faster to do, but is very gratifying. I based my project on these videos and I have received much support from the author of the first video.

The total cost of the project is about 450€.

Arduino CNC - [Link]

19 Feb 2015

IMG-20150218-WA0004-2-1024x979

by Francesco Truzzi @ b.truzzi.me:

I needed a small, fast and reliable multi-voltage level translator (mainly for connecting ESP8266 boards to the Arduino, got tired of resistor networks pretty quickly) so I built a breakout board for TI’s LSF0204(D).

Datasheet and info here.

The LSF0204 is a nice little chip. It can translate up to 4 signals to and from the following values:

1.0 V ↔ 1.8/2.5/3.3/5 V.
1.2 V ↔ 1.8/2.5/3.3/5 V.
1.8 V ↔ 2.5/3.3/5 V.
2.5 V ↔ 3.3/5 V.
3.3 V ↔ 5 V.

[via]

LSF0204 breakout board: a bidirectional, multi-voltage level converter - [Link]

18 Feb 2015

i7d_3121-600x400

Helge @ WeatherStation writes:

After some help from wolfmanjm and CosR1, I managed to get a separate Buydisplay based GSL1680 touch panel up’n running on an Arduino Mega (1280) with only minor modifications to wolfmanjms code.

The firmware is an integrated part of the sketch. Instead of using ram, it is put in the flash memory using PROGMEM. Some, to me, special memory magic is used to read the firmware from the sketch flash (Thanks to CosR1). There might be other ways, but I haven’t investigated further. From there it is easy to write the firmware to the GSL1680 though the I2C bus. Initialization of the GSL1680 is also a bit special. It needs some special sequence of operations. I’m not sure if the code is optimal in that regard, but it seems to be stable. Linux-sunxi.org has a wiki with some info. There is even some information on the internal firmware registers here (haven’t verified if this info is correct).
I’ve forked the original wolfmanjm/GSL1680 github repo to hellange/GSL1680 and checked in the modifications needed for Arduino MEGA.

[via]

5″ capacitive touch panel with GSL1680 up’n running with Arduino - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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