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29 Apr 2015

Jeremy Lang wanted to test some fuel injectors for a car he is restoring so he build a tester based on Arduino Pro Mini. Watch the video above to see the tester working and you can find the design files and code on Dropbox.

Arduino Fuel Injector Tester – [Link]

29 Apr 2015

IMG_20150116_154725

by mygeekblog.net:

As any beginner electronics hobbyist I have recently came to conclusion that using Arduino (or even Mega328) for small projects is neither cost-effective or educational (I’ll explain why later).

Another reason for writing this article is that I came across few ATTiny13A-SSU chips @ less than $0.90 each, which is even lower the official retail price, so I just had to buy 5 of them, although I didn’t know at the time whattahellamigointodowithit what is it really capable of.

Starting with ATTiny13 – [Link]

28 Apr 2015

FP2NND9I8PQYTCR.MEDIUM

by Ole_L @ instructables.com:

If you wanna build a fancy led matrix display with only a few pixels, this is exactly what YOU need!

You need:
-An Arduino
-WS2812(B) LED strip
-A piece wood
-7 jumper wires
-7 female pin headers
-some capacitors
-some wires

10×5 RGB LED Matrix with only 5 IO pins – [Link]

24 Apr 2015

FTAIXO8H3NN9MP6.MEDIUM

by amandaghassaei instructables.com:

Monitor your road speed using the Arduino. This project uses a magnetic switch (also called a reed switch) to measure the speed of one of the bike’s wheels. The Arduino calculates the mph, and send this information out to the LCD screen on the handlebars as you ride. It is compatible with any kind of bike/wheel, simply enter the radius of the wheel in the firmware to calibrate the device for your setup.

Arduino Bike Speedometer – [Link]


23 Apr 2015

UDOO_NEO

Wireless, Credit-Card sized, Android + Linux + Arduino™, Embedded Sensors, starting from $49. What else?

UDOO Neo embodies a new concept: a single board computer suitable for the Post-PC era:

  • Like a Raspberry Pi, you can program it in any language and run a full Linux environment with graphic interfaces.
  • You get all the simplicity of an Arduino-compatible board, thanks to the Cortex-M4 and the Arduino UNO pinout layout, with the possibility of adding most Arduino™ shields, actuators and sensors, both analog and digital.
  • An incredible, smoothly-running Android 4.4.3, it gives you the possibility to build new Android-based smart devices.
  • You get a wireless module: Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n + BT 4.0 (Classic Bluetooth and Bluetooth Low Energy), because we hate cables.
  • 9-axis motion sensors are embedded, to build your perfect drone/robot/3D printers/whatever or create new kinds of interactions with the real world.
  • Open-source hardware: because we love to let you hack things or create new devices from scratch!
  • Starting from $49!

UDOO Neo = Raspberry Pi + Arduino + Wi-Fi + BT 4.0 + Sensors – [Link]

20 Apr 2015

P1090837a

by berryjam.eu:

I used specialized triple half bridge IC L6234 (~ 8$). You can make the same spending less money (but more time) with MOSFET transistors or other IC.

L6234 datasheet is surprisingly useless. Go straight to Application Note AN1088 instead.

I added current limiting resistors (1kΩ) to all INputs and ENable pins, a bunch of capacitors recommended in application note and current sensing shunt resistor 0.6Ω (big blue one).

Spining BLDC motors at super Slow speeds with Arduino and L6234 – [Link]

14 Apr 2015

Boards-600x383

Peter Scargill writes:

If you’ve read my early blogs you’ll know I do a lot of work with a pal of mine, Aidan Ruff. We had an R&D company for years and one of our products was a home control system which was plastered all over the UK tech press at the time and loads of people loved it but it involved spouse-unfriendly WIRES – bad mistake. Well, this DOESN’T.

The two of us have been working on home control for several years and regular readers will know that in the past few months, the ESP8266 boards have turned everything around. I’ve scrapped various radio designs and gone “hell for leather” into using these boards, this original plan was with an Arduino Mega as a “master controller”. That too went out of the window when the Raspberry Pi 2 came out, dirt cheap but with more than enough power to control a house. Armed with a WIFI USB dongle, the basics of a completely wireless home control setup are now in place. Personally it could not be better timed as we’re moving house shortly and so this is an ideal opportunity to do the job properly before inflicting this on other people.

Home Control 2015 – [Link]

9 Apr 2015

2

by jojo @ circuitstoday.com

Recently we have learned how to interface GSM Module with Arduino and send/receive SMS using GSM module. Interfacing any device with a micro controller is the first step to building a useful system or project with that particular device. In this tutorial, we are going to build a very interesting project – a Fire Alarm System which will send SMS to a set of Mobile Numbers when fire occurs in a particular location. We have seen many typical Fire Alarm projects which will alert with a siren or an automatic shutdown mechanism. This fire alarm project make use of modern communication technologies to deal with emergencies.

GSM based SMS Alert Fire Alarm System using Arduino – [Link]

8 Apr 2015

tv-out

by Juan J. Martínez:

This is my first serious attempt to learn electronics. DAN64 is my first project and it has been a discovery process during 3 months of my free time. I had to learn a lot of things I didn’t know much about, from basic electronics to the details of the AVRs -and specifically the ATmega328-, and a whole world of things in between such as signalling, protocols, interfaces, modulation and demodulation, SDKs, EDA software, prototyping, PCB fabrication, etc.

I’m certain that in this project I’m doing many stupid things and I’m sure my approach to solving some of the problems is not the best, but in my discharge I can only say: it works! (to some extent at least).

I got lots of gotcha! moments, ups and downs where I though I couldn’t finish the project because perhaps what I was trying to achieve was just impossible.

So this is not about perfection but about good enough for me and about the learning process and having fun.

DAN64 – an AVR based 8-bit microcomputer – [Link]

6 Apr 2015

IMG_20150403_134859

by grav-corp.com:

So we’re always cooking up hot new hardware in the Grav Corp labs. Recently, we’ve been working on a project using a 128×64 OLED screen with the SSD1306 controller. Adafruit is a good source of these displays, with an excellent library written by Limor Fried. The Adafruit_SSD1306 library makes it simple to use these displays with a variety of Arduinos, using either software or hardware SPI. However, we wanted a speed boost, and the Due looked like it could deliver, with its DMA (Direct Memory Access) capability.

SSD1306 OLEDs – DMA Library for Arduino Due – [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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