Home Blog  





17 Dec 2014

by Afrotechmods @ youtube.com

A beginner’s guide to different battery chemistries and how to choose the right battery for your project.

How to choose a battery: A battery chemistry tutorial - [Link]

12 Dec 2014

Front2009

by Jim @ jimlaurwilliams.org:

I got a couple of cheap ($1.29) 1A USB LiPo chargers since I’m doing more and more LiPo/LiIon powered stuff. I mostly discharged a recycled 18650 cell for a test load and it looks like it does charge at nearly 1A. Two LEDs – red charging, green (mine is blue) fully charged. Seems like a pretty ideal cheap device.

Cheap USB LiPo charger notes - [Link]

28 Nov 2014

MCP1631HV

A battery charger is a device used to energize a rechargeable battery by driving an electric current through it. The charging protocol depends on the size and type of the battery being charged. Some battery types have high tolerance for overcharging and can be recharged by connection to a constant voltage source or a constant current source; simple chargers of this type require manual disconnection at the end of the charge cycle, or may have a timer to cut off charging current at a fixed time.

The MCP1631HV multi-chemistry reference design board is used to charge one, two, three or four NiMH batteries or one or two cell Li-Ion batteries. The board uses the MCP1631HV high speed analog PWM and PIC16F883 to generate the charge algorithm for NiMH, NiCd or Li-Ion batteries. It is used to evaluate Microchip’s MCP1631HV in a SEPIC power converter application. As provided, it is user programmable using on board pushes buttons. The board can charge NiMH, NiCd or Li-Ion batteries. It provides a constant current charge (Ni based chemistry) and constant current / constant voltage (Li-Ion) with preconditioning, cell temperature monitoring (Ni based) and battery pack fault monitoring. Also, the charger provides a status or fault indication. It automatically detects the insertion or removal of a battery pack.

The MCP1631 multi-chemistry battery charger reference design is a complete stand-alone constant current battery charger for NiMH, NiCd or Li-Ion battery packs. When charging NiMH or NiCd batteries the reference design is capable of charging one, two, three or four batteries connected in series. If Li-Ion chemistry is selected, the board is capable of charging one or two series batteries. This board utilizes Microchip’s MCP1631HV (high-speed PIC® MCU PWM TSSOP-20). The input voltage range for the demo board is 5.3V to 16V.

Multi-Chemistry Battery Charger from Microchip - [Link]

26 Nov 2014

Comparison_v_penny_smallx600

Steve Taranovich @ edn.com:

Panasonic Corporation has developed a pin-shaped Lithium Ion battery (CG-320, nominal capacity 13mAh) with a diameter of 3.5mm and a weight of 0.6g.

This offering will give designers an added choice to their power sources for new designs among paper and thin film batteries but is not an earth-shattering battery breakthrough. EaglePicher has had small LiIon batteries for implantables for a while and Quallion has a 2.6mm diameter by 10.9mm height in their QL0002l device for implantables and sensors—BUT—it has only 1.5 mAh capacity.

Tiny pin-shaped Lithium Ion battery - [Link]


15 Nov 2014

4121

by linear.com:

The LTC®4121 is a 400mA constant-current/constantvoltage (CC/CV) synchronous step-down battery charger. In addition to CC/CV operation, the LTC4121 regulates its input voltage to a programmable percentage of the input open-circuit voltage. This technique enables maximum power operation with high impedance input sources such as solar panels.

An external resistor programs the charge current up to 400mA. The LTC4121-4.2 is suitable for charging Li-Ion/ Polymer batteries, while the programmable float voltage of the LTC4121 is suitable for several battery chemistries.

LTC4121/LTC4121- 4.2 – 40V 400mA Synchronous Step-Down Battery Charger - [Link]

13 Nov 2014

intrologo-lithium-battery-charger

by electro-labs.com:

In this project, we are building a programmable single/multi cell lithium battery charger shield for Arduino. The shield provides LCD and button interface which let the user set the battery cut-off voltage from 2V to 10V and charge current from 50mA to 1.1A. The charger also provides the ability to monitor the battery status before and during charge.

The charger is based on LT1510 Constant Current/Constant Voltage Battery charger IC and controlled by Arduino UNO. The display on the shield is Nokia 5110 LCD which is very simple to use and still available on the market. There are two different battery connectors available on the shield, a two contact screw terminal block and a right angle 2mm JST-PH connector.

DIY Lithium Battery Charger Shield for Arduino - [Link]

31 Oct 2014

BQ25100

by ti.com:

The bq2510x series of devices are highly integrated Li-Ion and Li-Pol linear chargers targeted at space-limited portable applications. The high input voltage range with input overvoltage protection supports low-cost unregulated adapters.

The bq2510x has a single power output that charges the battery. A system load can be placed in parallel with the battery as long as the average system load does not keep the battery from charging fully during the 10 hour safety timer.

BQ25100 – 250-mA Single Cell Li-Ion Battery Charger - [Link]

17 Oct 2014

Li_IonCell

by elektor.com:

Recent advances of Li-Ion battery technology could be the kick start the faltering electric vehicle market needs for it to go main stream. As well as the fast charge time the new battery can be cycled more than 10,000 times and has a lifespan of 20 years.

The work carried out at NTU Singapore replaces the traditional graphite anode with one made from titanium dioxide, an abundant, cheap and safe material found in soil. It is commonly used as a food additive and in sunscreen lotions. Before the material can be used it is converted into fine nanotubes which allows faster chemical reactions in the cell giving it super fast recharge times.

Li-Ion battery recharges to 70% in 2 mins - [Link]

15 Oct 2014

smart-battery

by Darren Quick @ gizmag.com:

There have been numerous cases of lithium-ion batteries catching fire in everything from mobile phones and laptops to cars and airplanes. While the odds of this occurring are low, the fact that hundreds of millions of lithium-ion batteries are produced and sold every year means the risk is still very real. Researchers at Stanford University have now developed a “smart” lithium-ion battery that would provide users with a warning if it is overheating and likely to burst into flames.

“Smart” lithium-ion battery would warn users if it is going to ignite - [Link]

22 Sep 2014

FEVAXRZHX1WIMWV.MEDIUM

by pinomelean @ instructables.com:

Lithium based batteries are a versatile way of storing energy; they have one of the highest energy density and specific energy(360 to 900 kJ/kg) among rechargeable batteries.

The downside is that, unlike capacitors or other kinds of batteries, they can not be charged by a regular power supply. They need to be charged up to a specific voltage and with limited current, otherwise they turn into potential incendiary bombs.

And that’s no joke, storing such a high amount of energy in a small and normally tight packaged device can be really dangerous.

Li-ion battery charging guide - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

Search Site | Advertising | Contact Us
Elektrotekno.com | Free Schematics Search Engine | Electronic Kits